Bulldog Yeast Infection

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    What can I use to treat an irritation in my English Bulldog's facial folds?
    I have a 10mos. old English Bulldog and he has developed a moist skin irritation and/or minor yeast infection in the facial fold under one of his eyes. This problem is quite common among the breed. I wanted to find out if anyone knows what type of ointment or solution can temporarily be used to treat it until I take him to the vet next weekend? Thanks for your opinions.

    • ANSWER:
      Peace on Earth has already given you the correct answer:

      as a groomer this is the response I have been trained to give many owners with this same question,
      "English Bulldogs are prone to developing yeast infections within the folds of their face, for this reason owners should prevent the bacteria build-up by wiping out the folds via the use of a warm, damp cloth daily. When signs of an irritation or possible infection occur, continue to clean the folds out in the same manner so long as it does not cause the dog any obvious discomfort, and of course speak to your vet about these types of concerns as soon as they arrive to avoid any major skin irritation."

      You are a step above most of the owners I've already spoken to about this as you already are aware that this is a common problem and you know to take your dog to the vet for it. Many owners I've known will wait until the skin within the folds of their dog's face will be completely raw and infected, then the owner brings the dog to the groomer to be cleaned expecting that the smell from between the folds will magically vanish after a bath, of course by this point the groomer can only refer the owner to a vet because the skin irritation has become a major medical problem.

      Good on you for researching your dog's specific care requirements and loving him enough to seek proper medical care, you are a step above many others on this forum!

  2. QUESTION:
    Why does yogurt cure yeast infections in dogs??
    My vet has tried all sorts or drugs and lotions to get rid of my bulldogs yeast infections. A friend recomended I feed here some yogurt everyday. Sure enough the infection is gone. Anyone know why? Its truly amazing!!

    • ANSWER:
      It does it in humans too! Has to do with the live and active cultures in yogourt...

  3. QUESTION:
    My Bulldog has an infection in his wrinkle above his nose?
    I has caused hair loss, looks red, and leaves a yellowish funky discharge. I've read this could be a yeast infection? Are their any experienced Bulldog owners out there that have a home remedy?

    His vet appointment is next week.

    • ANSWER:
      Are you talking about the fold above the nose, if so yes this area is a breeding ground for bacteria to build up the area stays moist and if not cleaned daily will build bacteria and fungus can build up in the area.

      Clean the area you can use a damp cloth or baby wipes with aloe, Bulldogs are prone to wrinkle infections, after cleaning the area you can use diaper rash ointment in the fold, keeping the area clean and dry is best to prevent infections, the folds in the tail area are another problem for Bulldogs. You can also use Gold Bond powder to keep the area dry.

  4. QUESTION:
    What could be wrong with my dogs ears?
    My Bulldog had been scratching his ears a lot and yelping so I took him to the vet and said he had a yeast infection in his ears so they gave him some ear drops. We have been using these ear drops for over a month already and my dog is still doing it. Should I take my dog back? What would be the next thing they could do for him?

    • ANSWER:

  5. QUESTION:
    My Bulldog has a yeast infection in his wrinkles. What can I use to clean them?
    It's an awful smell and irritated (yeast!). What can I use to clean out the yeast?

    • ANSWER:
      Always cleaning it daily will keep it from occurring & using a mixture of half water/half apple cider vinegar will change the ph & is a natural antifungal & antibiotic. Adding a tiny amount to drinking water will also help body ph level back to normal so it can fight any yeast from coming back. The wrinkles need to stay clean & dry which cleaning daily will do.

  6. QUESTION:
    How to clean bulldog's between wrinkle on her nose and watery eye?
    I have 1.5 year old English female bulldog. She has a lot of wrinkles on her face which is good but it smells sometimes. I clean her wrinkle everyday with clean dry tissue. Some say mixture of water and vinegar is the best. Her left eye is always watery and tear comes up all the time. Doctor said her skin is very loose that's why it bugs her eye, recommended a skin-cut surgery.Does any body help me to solve this issue?

    • ANSWER:
      A lot of bulldogs do end up needing a "facelift" so that they stop getting chronic yeast infections. And if the skin fold is rubbing against her eye, then you really need to get that done - her eye will start to scar if the skin and fur keep rubbing on it.

      And if the "looseness" means that her eyelid is loose and baggy, then she does need an eyelift to help her eye - there isn't any more you can do.

      As for cleaning her skin, a dry tissue won't do anything. You want something slightly acidic, like a vinegar solution, to help keep yeast (that's what smells and makes red-brown stains inside the fold) from being able to grow. Your vet may sell a product called Malacetic Wipes - they are like baby wipes but they are formulated to help prevent yeast. They are perfect for smelly skin folds.

      If your vet doesn't have any other suggestions besides surgery for her eye, then you need to either do the surgery or take your bulldog to a veterinary ophthalmologist for a second opinion.

  7. QUESTION:
    How do you keep an English Bulldogs nose rolls clean?
    I clean them everyday with dry Q-Tips and there is still some kind of discharge on them. Should I put anything on the Q-Tips? Do you have an English Bulldog?

    • ANSWER:
      Check with your vet, often these dogs will get yeast infections in the skin folds. It happens a lot on the folds of the face and that fold they get at the tail. There are medicated wipes that do a great job of keeping the discharge and smell under control called Maleseb wipes.

  8. QUESTION:
    Anyone know of a natural ear infection remedy for dogs?
    My Basset Hound has had a couple ear infecions caused by yeast and she has another one now. In the past she has used prescription Mometamax. Is there a natural remedy that will treat and cure the infection? I want to avoid taking her to the vet again if at all possible.
    I dont need smart assed answers please, I know what my dog has, I know that Basset Hounds are susceptible to ear infections, I take care of her and Im a big believer in natural cures. If you cant answer my question with a logical, polite answer dont answer at all.
    THANKS in advance for your help!

    • ANSWER:
      My bulldog Bulldozer used to get sore ears and they smelled like cheese. So my vet said to try vinegar and rubbing alcohol. Fifty percent of each or half and half.
      The vinegar breaks down the gunk and the alcohol dries up water from say a bath. I used it after every bath and some times in between. Do not use it more than once a week. Too much drying can be painful. Also the smell of funky ears can draw flies that will bite and aggravate you puppy.

      Best to do this outside and only if your dog really trusts you. I had someone else pour in the medicine I would hold him still and hold his ear open. Then we would filler up. Flop his ears closed and massage the sides of his head and then let him go. This is the gross part he would shake his head and any thing loosened up would come out. Every thing would fly out. So we did this outside and in not our best clothes. With a floppy eared dog you will need to wipe away the excess after he shakes his head. Towel drying his head if he goes out in the rain or sprinkler etc is also a good idea. They don’t sweat but their skin and ears produces oil like ours.

      Do not use this solution if your dog has open sores the vinegar and the alcohol will sting.

      You could get bit or he may never let you touch his / her head again.

      Never never ever use hydrogen peroxide. The foaming action causes pressure and can damage their ears permanently.

  9. QUESTION:
    What can I give my dog for an ear infection?
    My american bulldog is miserable and i cant get ahold of his vet, what can i give him to help with the pain til i can get him to his vet??

    • ANSWER:
      are you sure it's an ear infection? maybe it's a yeast infection in the ear? if your not 100% sure what you give him may hurt more than help.

  10. QUESTION:
    Is having an english bulldog a high risk for constant vet trips?
    Ever since I was a young one I wanted a bull dog and now that im a grown man I can buy my own and not rely on someone else to buy it for me. My wife says she doesnt want one cause of the $$$ tied up in owning one. Any advise is taken and considerd.

    • ANSWER:
      We have a 3.5 year old English Bully. She does have allergies for about 3 months out of the year. You have to wipe their wrinkles on a regular basis or they will get a yeast infection inside of them. If you are concerned about vet bills you may want to reconsider the breed you are looking for. They are an expensive breed, but they are also wonderful. Ours has very few problems besides the allergies (knock on wood), but I have heard of flipped stomachs, cherry eye, palette problems, etc. If you decide to purchase one just understand that the dog didn't choose you, you chose that dog so if it costs money for health issues you need to take care of it. If you ever decide to breed then it is really expensive- there are many vet visits (expect about - visits) and expect to spend a lot of money (3,000-6,000 just to breed).

  11. QUESTION:
    How do you get rid of tear stain?
    I just bought a 2 year old maltese that was in really bad shape when i got her. She has the worse tear stain that i have ever seen. Does anybody have any low cost ideas on how to get rid of it? thanks!
    And i thought i'd let miss mandaree know that she can not have my dog....lol!! I love you and all but im sorry! =)

    • ANSWER:
      Tear Stain Removal

      Tear stain removal has become some what easier with various products, medication and home remedies. You may consult with groomers for commercial product recommendations. We have tested a few of the commercial products and have found results to be average at best. We have noticed they tend to lighten the stain color but don't really remove it, even after 8-12 weeks of use. There is some home remedies that show promise and some by rx.

      Tetracycline

      Consult your vet for this method as it requires a RX anyway. This method should only be used when all others have failed and should only be used for 1-2 courses of treatment and not relied on as a continued treatment. Some have found success in eliminating tear staining by putting a bulldog on a ten day course of low dose tetracycline. Occasionally this may need to be repeated. Do not use this in puppies that have not yet cut their adult teeth. Tetracycline has been shown to cause teeth which have not erupted to permanently stain yellow.

      TUMS

      If you need to change the pH of your dogs system to aid in preventing yeast or infection then Tums is primarily a source of Calcium, known as an antacid formulated as 500 mg Calcium Carbonate. Giving your Bulldog 1/2 of the Fruit flavored variety twice a day will help change the pH of the tears. This will change the tears' environment and can help make it hostile for the continued growth of yeast and bacteria.

      White Vinegar

      A teaspoon of white cider vinegar can be added to your dogs drinking water to control new tear stains. It may take a while for your dog to "decide" to drink this water so start with a little less and gradually increase the amount of vinegar. Vinegar works much like TUMS in that it can changes the pH of the drinking water. Changing the pH of your dog slightly will do wonders in the tear stain war and help eliminate bacteria and deep stain color and prevent yeast build up and is best used as a prevention once you have the tear stains removed or nearly removed. This will help for the future of the tear stains and make them a minimum occurrence.

      Milk of Magnesia, corn starch and peroxide

      Use equal volume of MOM (plain white) and peroxide, and then use the corn starch to make a good paste of this; put on and work well into the stained area and let dry 4 hours. Wash out, CONDITION WELL. Keep doing this for several days until tear staining is gone, although I would recommend skipping a day or two between applications if possible. Apply a thin coat of desitan diaper rash ointment after the area is washed out and dry. Try this every other day if possible and the choice way of doing it. If your dog has heavy stains then do this for 3 days in a row, then skip every other day.

      This MOM formula is my personal preference when I do need to remove tear stain color from the face of dogs. It works well but give it a few days to show results.

      Corn Flour, water and a drop of bleach

      Take a 2 teaspoon of corn flour, add a few drops of boiling hot water and mix to a paste. Add 1 single drop of plain bleach. mix again. Allow the mixture to cool down and apply to the tear stain area. Allow to dry (10 minutes), wait 1 hour and remove with warm water and clean cloth. Then wipe on a thin layer or peroxide and allow to air dry and leave alone. Repeat every other day for 2 weeks. DO NOT get any in the dogs eye.

      You should also make sure your dog don't have a tear duct obstruction (blockage) and have corrected the food and water issue first so he don't keep getting tear stains. After all if you treat the tear stains to remove them while at the same time you feed a food that causes tear stains you won't gain nothing. Try the least invasive of the above methods first, give them 2-4 weeks to work, then if your not satisfied go to another method of treatment. Do not use multiple treatments at the same time. Always have your vet give the dog a complete exam to rule out any serious eye condition first before trying anything else. The commercial products just don't work very well so it is best to just forget about them unless you have a very mild case of stain.

  12. QUESTION:
    how can i stop my chihuahuas eyes for watering and staining her face?
    I have a year and a half old chihuahua and her eyes water and i no its common for chihuahuas eyes to water but how can i stop it staining her face or stop her eyes from watering so much?

    • ANSWER:
      Tou can't stop them from watering but it does help if you clean them everyday here is how:

      Tear Stain Removal

      Tear stain removal has become some what easier with various products, medication and home remedies. You may consult with groomers for commercial product recommendations. We have tested a few of the commercial products and have found results to be average at best. We have noticed they tend to lighten the stain color but don't really remove it, even after 8-12 weeks of use. There is some home remedies that show promise and some by rx.

      Tetracycline Consult your vet for this method as it requires a RX anyway. This method should only be used when all others have failed and should only be used for 1-2 courses of treatment and not relied on as a continued treatment. Some have found success in eliminating tear staining by putting a bulldog on a ten day course of low dose tetracycline. Occasionally this may need to be repeated. Do not use this in puppies that have not yet cut their adult teeth. Tetracycline has been shown to cause teeth which have not erupted to permanently stain yellow.

      TUMS
      If you need to change the pH of your dogs system to aid in preventing yeast or infection then Tums is primarily a source of Calcium, known as an antacid formulated as 500 mg Calcium Carbonate. Giving your Bulldog 1/2 of the Fruit flavored variety twice a day will help change the pH of the tears. This will change the tears' environment and can help make it hostile for the continued growth of yeast and bacteria.

      White Vinegar
      A teaspoon of white cider vinegar can be added to your dogs drinking water to control new tear stains. It may take a while for your dog to "decide" to drink this water so start with a little less and gradually increase the amount of vinegar. Vinegar works much like TUMS in that it can changes the pH of the drinking water. Changing the pH of your dog slightly will do wonders in the tear stain war and help eliminate bacteria and deep stain color and prevent yeast build up and is best used as a prevention once you have the tear stains removed or nearly removed. This will help for the future of the tear stains and make them a minimum occurrence.

      Milk of Magnesia, corn starch and peroxide

      Use equal volume of MOM (plain white) and peroxide, and then use the corn starch to make a good paste of this; put on and work well into the stained area and let dry 4 hours. Wash out, CONDITION WELL. Keep doing this for several days until tear staining is gone, although I would recommend skipping a day or two between applications if possible. Apply a thin coat of desitan diaper rash ointment after the area is washed out and dry. Try this every other day if possible and the choice way of doing it. If your dog has heavy stains then do this for 3 days in a row, then skip every other day.

      This MOM formula is my personal preference when I do need to remove tear stain color from the face of dogs. It works well but give it a few days to show results.

      Corn Flour, water and a drop of bleach

      Take a 2 teaspoon of corn flour, add a few drops of boiling hot water and mix to a paste. Add 1 single drop of plain bleach. mix again. Allow the mixture to cool down and apply to the tear stain area. Allow to dry (10 minutes), wait 1 hour and remove with warm water and clean cloth. Then wipe on a thin layer or peroxide and allow to air dry and leave alone. Repeat every other day for 2 weeks. DO NOT get any in the dogs eye.

      You should also make sure your dog don't have a tear duct obstruction (blockage) and have corrected the food and water issue first so he don't keep getting tear stains. After all if you treat the tear stains to remove them while at the same time you feed a food that causes tear stains you won't gain nothing. Try the least invasive of the above methods first, give them 2-4 weeks to work, then if your not satisfied go to another method of treatment. Do not use multiple treatments at the same time. Always have your vet give the dog a complete exam to rule out any serious eye condition first before trying anything else. The commercial products just don't work very well so it is best to just forget about them unless you have a very mild case of stain

  13. QUESTION:
    How do I get my bulldog to stop scratching?

    • ANSWER:
      Bulldogs are infamous for having skin problems, like inhalant and food allergies. If you do not see any fleas, or flea dirt, and if he is that itchy, go to your vet. There are tons of medications that you can try for allergies. Bacterial and yeast infections on the skin can also cause itching. Get your dog checked, and see what you can do to help.

  14. QUESTION:
    Can a bulldog be allergic to beef?
    I have a client that believes his bulldog is allergic to beef and beef flavored dogfood. He thinks that the beef gives his dog a reaction that makes the dog's ears seep liquid causing discomfort and possible ear infection. I don't think this is because of the beef flavored food.

    • ANSWER:
      An animal could be allergic to anything, and believe it or not, beef is a common food allergen in dogs. 90%+ of allergies are not to food, though, but to environmental stimuli (weeds, pollen, mold, soaps, etc.). Beef, eggs, wheat, chicken, corn, soy, dairy products, and yeast are the most common of food allergies in dogs.

      Ear infection is a common sign of food allergy. Environmental allergies often produce symptoms of itchiness all over the body-food allergies often create ear problems and itchy paws. If the dogs ears are seeping liquid, an infection is much more than a possibility, it's nearly a certainty. Your client should either try an elimination diet or see a vet for allergy testing to determine exactly what the cause is, and to work out a treatment plan (immunotherapy is the best course).

  15. QUESTION:
    Anyone have any recent complaints about Large Breed Diamond Dogfood?
    I realize they had issues a few years back with the corn in their food, but the Large Breed does not contain any corn. The reason why I am asking this is because my bulldog is loosing his hair at an increasing pace and I can't get him to the vet until Monday and we are speculating if the food might be causing it since we just change to Diamond within the last few months. Any thoughts?

    • ANSWER:
      Diamond is a fairly low quality food. Here are the first 12 ingredients: Chicken, chicken meal, cracked pearled barley, whole grain brown rice, white rice, rice bran, beet pulp, chicken fat (preserved with mixed tocopherols), egg product, flaxseed, natural chicken flavor, brewers dried yeast.
      A good quality food should not contain, white rice, rice bran, beet pulp, egg product or flavorings
      Dogfoodanalysis.com only rates is as a 3 star food. Here's their review: The first two ingredients in the food are named meat products. The first is chicken - inclusive of its water content. Once this is removed, as it must be to make a dry food, the ingredient will weigh around 20% of its wet weight. It is thus unlikely that it is the true first ingredient in the food, and it is likely to be more accurately placed much further down the ingredient list. Since the second ingredient is a meat meal, however, this is of limited concern. Chicken meal is the sole meat meal ingredient in the food.

      The next 4 ingredients are all grains. These are primarily decent quality grains, but we note that three of these are forms of rice (the ingredient is "split") and it appears likely that the combined grain ingredients would outweigh the meat meal ingredient in this food. Consequently, our confidence that the food contains a decent amount of meat is low.

      Beet pulp is controversial filler. It is a by-product, being dried residue from sugar beets which has been cleaned and extracted in the process of manufacturing sugar. It is a controversial ingredient in dog food, claimed by some manufacturers to be a good source of fibre, and derided by others as an ingredient added to slow down the transition of rancid animal fats and causing stress to kidney and liver in the process. We note that beet pulp is an ingredient that commonly causes problems for dogs, including allergies and ear infections, and prefer not to see it used in dog food. There are less controversial products around if additional fibre is required.

      We would prefer to see the use of whole eggs rather than egg product in the food.

      Try Merrick, Innova, California Natural, Wellness, Blue Buffalo, Evo, Before Grain, Avoderm, etc.

  16. QUESTION:
    Why does my English Bulldog Pup always scratches her ears?
    like she doesnt have fleas and her skin doesnt seem to be dry but when she comes in she scratches her ears and tries to bite her butt or the back of her leg. She did that thing where dog rub there butt for the first time last night on the floor. What do you think this is ?

    • ANSWER:
      She might need her anal glands expressed if she is rubbing her butt on the floor. Call your vet and tell them she needs it checked, it's very routine and only takes a few minutes.

      Maybe she has some sort of skin allergy if she is biting her legs. Again, consult your vet.

      If she is scratching her ears she probably has ear mites. It's very easy to clear up but can do lots of damage is the problem is ignored and she keeps scratching. She could pop a blood vessel or do inner ear damage if the mites are driving her that crazy. She could also have a yeast infection if moisture got down into her ear canal and couldn't dry up (for example- after a bath if she wasn't dried all the way or if another dog licked her ear and got saliva down there). Either way, a vet visit is in order. Both problems are very easy to clear up but need prescription medication.

  17. QUESTION:
    my french bulldog is getting sores in his folds from his eyes running, this is a new problem, what can I do?
    he is a year old today, started with a small sore on his cheek last week, I've been keeping them clean, now there is a dry crusty sore on one side of his face and I can't seem to find any related info on how to prevent or help this heal for him!

    • ANSWER:
      It's yeast. I would see the vet because it sounds like it has reached the level of an infection. You just have to keep those folds of skin dry and clean.

  18. QUESTION:
    What kind of Medical Illnesses are common for an English Bulldog?

    • ANSWER:
      They can easily succumb to heat exhaustion, cataracts, hip dysplasia, elbow dysplasia, "cherry eye", acne, yeast infections, heart murmur, bloat, etc. English Bulldogs are great dogs, but they're not the healthiest of breeds. Google the illnesses that are common with the breed. There's quite a large list unfortunately. They have been bred to look appealing, but because of their short snout, their heavy yet short body, their wrinkles, etc. they are more susceptible to some things than other breeds.

  19. QUESTION:
    The topical part of my dogs nose is dry and pealing off.?
    Bits of her nose are pealing off (like little slabs). It seems to be superficial but it never fully heals and has been happening for about a year. I assumed it was because she is getting older. She is 9 years old.
    He is a pitbull/possibly a husky mix.

    • ANSWER:
      What kind of dog do you have? It could be a yeast infection... bulldogs are prone to them because of the rope about their nose. You can try putting cortisone cream, neosporin, or vaseline on it. And make sure to clean it daily with a baby wipe.

  20. QUESTION:
    My english bulldog has a yeast infection in his ears!!!?
    My english bulldog has a yeast infection in his ears...the vet gave me some solution to flush them every night but doesnt really help...on top of that he keeps dragging his butt on the floor!!! he doesnt have worms and its not his anal gland. any ideas???

    • ANSWER:
      Wow those other two people are weird!

      Anyways, if the solution isn't working I highly recommend calling your vet and letting him know the symptoms, and that the solution he gave you didn't work. He may just have you come in and pick up an antibiotic or different ear cleanser without even having to pay for an office visit.

      I had the same problem and this is what I did. The ears aren't something to mess around with, especially in dogs. Leaving an infection untreated properly can cause your dog to go deaf.

      For the butt scratching thing, I'd recommend going to the local pet store and buying a mild shampoo with oatmeal, or some type of skin conditioner. Make sure to wash that area well, as well as rinsing thoroughly. If this doesn't work, tell your vet about this. Your poor guy might have a skin allergy. This is one of the main seasons for dog allergies.

      Good Luck and I hope your dog feels better soon!

  21. QUESTION:
    what can you use to help a english bulldog that has a yeast growing on his skin?
    in the summer spring and fall we bath him twice a week with 2 coats of selsum blue and 2 coats of oatmeal shampoo the vet told us it would help it does but in the winter we cant bath him and he gives off a horrible odor is there any way we could stop the yeast & stink!!!!!!! doderant spray for dogs didnt help so if you have a way to get the yeast and stink off my dog please tell me asap thank you

    • ANSWER:
      Get some Dermacton it is manufactured in the UK and all natural. Here are some before and after photos of a Shih tzu with a fungal infection on its feet :

      http://twitpic.com/3uvpn9

      You can buy it directly from the manufacturer www.aromesse.com with a money back guarantee. The shampoo is awesome and will really help with the bad smell.

  22. QUESTION:
    Help why is my bulldogs head shaking it just started only apply if u know ty?

    • ANSWER:
      there are a lot of reasons he could be shaking his head. otitis is a general name for an ear infection...he could be in the beginning stages of otitis externa which could lead to otitis media then to otitis interna (outer, middle and inner ear infections) which can lead to full on head tilts. they are usually caused by yeast infections...its a smell you will never forget if you are lucky enough to smell it (jk)...anyway it could also be something like "swimmers ear" or something to that effect....you should prob take him to the vet so they can get a culture and clean it/ give antibiotics

  23. QUESTION:
    what is the best thing to use toclean my french bulldogs face wrinkles on a daily basis?

    • ANSWER:
      Un-scented baby wipes to clean the folds. Dry them well afterwards. If the folds "smell" or develop brown goo, she may have developed a yeast infection in the folds. Ask your vet for Malaseb Pledgetts--little pads that are wonderful for cleaning these folds.

  24. QUESTION:
    Why do English bulldogs tails get infected?
    I have a English bull dog and her tail is infected I heard some one said that they do but I don't now why

    • ANSWER:
      English bulldogs sometimes tend to be genetic nightmares. They tend to have problems in the folds of their face, between the toes, ears, and tail. The skin is "bunched" up on the tail, causing creases where its dark and moist and is great breeding ground for yeast. The same thing happens in the feet and on the face. The most of the time you will have yeast infections in these areas, and your vet can prescribe some cleanser that will help keep these areas clean. You can also clean out these folds with a damp washcloth daily and it can help.

  25. QUESTION:
    Are english bulldogs hard to take care of compared to other dogs?

    • ANSWER:
      you have to be diligent about washing out their folds. they are pretty prone to developing yeast infections in them. also make sure you research thier health problems before you purchase one. i think they're really cute but would probably never own one.

  26. QUESTION:
    My dog has an ear infection?
    My english bulldog has an yeast infection in both of his ears. I was just wondering if the vet could do a full ear flush/douche cleansing procedure like we can get done if we need to by a doctor. I am using medicine for his ears they gave me but I was thinking that this could help if they actually do it. Also if you know, what about the price range$$?

    • ANSWER:
      Yeast infections can be caused because the dog is allergic to grains. You may want to look into feeding a grainless dog food, especially if you see the dog itching. The ear flush was done under anesthesia with my Yorkie and didn't do any good. I don't know if anesthesia was necessary for the ear flush alone because we were doing another procedure at the same time. The ear infection would always return after the meds were finished. I switched her to a grainless food Taste of the Wild and starting using a product called Zymox with hydrocortisone. They sell it at www.amazon.com for less than .00 with shipping. Read the reviews. This is the only product used that the ear infection did not return, but I am sure she was also helped by the grainless diet. It's been over a year now and no ear infections. I think the ear flush was about .00 plus the anesthesia and bloodwork being another 0.00. Good luck I know how frustrating recurring ear infections can be.

      http://www.amazon.com/Zymox-Otic-1-0%25-Hydrocortisone-Bottle/dp/B000COE5D2/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1?ie=UTF8&s=home-garden&qid=1235425679&sr=8-1

  27. QUESTION:
    What is a good way to get rid of my dogs tearstains?

    • ANSWER:
      Tear stain causes and removal options

      Nature of Tear Stains

      Tear staining is most obvious on dogs with white and other light color coats or with heavy wrinkles. The stain is usually reddish-brown.

      Whenever hair rests around the eyes some amount of tear staining results from the hair wicking moisture from the eyes, both above and mainly below the eye. But there are many other sources of tear stains. Tear staining can be traced to health and diet, as well as genetics. Most veterinarians agree that face staining results from excessive tearing. In this case, the damp face hair is a breeding ground for bacterial and yeast growth. The most common is "Red Yeast" which is usually associated with reddish-brown facial stains, and which may emit a moderate to noticeably strong odor. Tear ducts may become infected and result in excess tearing and noticeable staining.

      Some owners have consulted veterinary eye specialists on the problem. The doctors advised them that the eye structure was the most probable source of the problem. If that is so, then genetics would likely play a role and explain why the problem is more pronounced in some pets of the same breed. If you are purchasing a puppy and you care concerned about the potential for tearing and staining, you should observe the mother and sire, and others in the direct lineage.

      Eye duct surgical procedures to increase their tear capacity may help some pets; ask your veterinarian.

      Haircoat stains also occur in areas other than the eyes. White and light color coats, wrinkled faces and short nosed breeds like our beloved bulldog can acquire water stains from pet drinking water, bacteria and red or pimple looking bumps may appear as well, try using a stainless steel bowl for food and water and clean at least 3 times weekly in a dishwasher to sterilize them. Minerals in the water may stain facial hair in the whisker, and mouth areas, as well as other areas on the chest and front legs when water regular drips. Purified waters/bottled water with low mineral content may be the answer.
      Some pet foods with certain additives will stain hair in the mouth area, HOWEVER BEET PULP WILL NOT CASE TEAR STAINS, that is mis-information to assume it will. Beet pulp used in dog foods and treats are "sugar" beets, they are white, not red and do not contribute to tear stains.

      Your first step is to determine the source of tear and face stains. As we have noted, it may be water and food sources and that can be corrected. Tear staining often involves more complex solutions requiring veterinary introspection to determine the source.

      If bacterial and yeast infections are involved you need to take steps to reduce and eliminate their presence. Veterinarians can prescribe medication to treat bacterial and yeast infections. Your veterinarian or eye specialist veterinarians can determine if excessive tearing is the source of stains, and describe alternatives available.

      Tear Stain Removal

      Tear stain removal has become some what easier with various products, medication and home remedies. You may consult with groomers for commercial product recommendations. We have tested a few of the commercial products and have found results to be average at best. We have noticed they tend to lighten the stain color but don't really remove it, even after 8-12 weeks of use. There is some home remedies that show promise and some by rx.

      Tetracycline
      Consult your vet for this method as it requires a RX anyway. This method should only be used when all others have failed and should only be used for 1-2 courses of treatment and not relied on as a continued treatment. Some have found success in eliminating tear staining by putting a bulldog on a ten day course of low dose tetracycline. Occasionally this may need to be repeated. Do not use this in puppies that have not yet cut their adult teeth. Tetracycline has been shown to cause teeth which have not erupted to permanently stain yellow.

      TUMS
      If you need to change the pH of your dogs system to aid in preventing yeast or infection then Tums is primarily a source of Calcium, known as an antacid formulated as 500 mg Calcium Carbonate. Giving your Bulldog 1/2 of the Fruit flavored variety twice a day will help change the pH of the tears. This will change the tears' environment and can help make it hostile for the continued growth of yeast and bacteria.

      White Vinegar
      A teaspoon of white cider vinegar can be added to your dogs drinking water to control new tear stains. It may take a while for your dog to "decide" to drink this water so start with a little less and gradually increase the amount of vinegar. Vinegar works much like TUMS in that it can changes the pH of the drinking water. Changing the pH of your dog slightly will do wonders in the tear stain war and help eliminate bacteria and deep stain color and prevent yeast build up and is best used as a prevention once you have the tear stains removed or nearly removed. This will help for the future of the tear stains and make them a minimum occurrence.

      Milk of Magnesia, corn starch and peroxide

      Use equal volume of MOM (plain white) and peroxide, and then use the corn starch to make a good paste of this; put on and work well into the stained area and let dry 4 hours. Wash out, CONDITION WELL. Keep doing this for several days until tear staining is gone, although I would recommend skipping a day or two between applications if possible. Apply a thin coat of desitan diaper rash ointment after the area is washed out and dry. Try this every other day if possible and the choice way of doing it. If your dog has heavy stains then do this for 3 days in a row, then skip every other day.

      This MOM formula is my personal preference when I do need to remove tear stain color from the face of dogs. It works well but give it a few days to show results.

      Corn Flour, water and a drop of bleach

      Take a 2 teaspoon of corn flour, add a few drops of boiling hot water and mix to a paste. Add 1 single drop of plain bleach. mix again. Allow the mixture to cool down and apply to the tear stain area. Allow to dry (10 minutes), wait 1 hour and remove with warm water and clean cloth. Then wipe on a thin layer or peroxide and allow to air dry and leave alone. Repeat every other day for 2 weeks. DO NOT get any in the dogs eye.

      You should also make sure your dog don't have a tear duct obstruction (blockage) and have corrected the food and water issue first so he don't keep getting tear stains. After all if you treat the tear stains to remove them while at the same time you feed a food that causes tear stains you won't gain nothing. Try the least invasive of the above methods first, give them 2-4 weeks to work, then if your not satisfied go to another method of treatment. Do not use multiple treatments at the same time. Always have your vet give the dog a complete exam to rule out any serious eye condition first before trying anything else. The commercial products just don't work very well so it is best to just forget about them unless you have a very mild case of stain.

  28. QUESTION:
    I have an English Bulldog and he stinks?
    he smells like dead ass i bathe him once a week i bleach everything in the rooms he is in cause the foul smell is everywhere .what can i do to rid of this smell ? it is his jaws and his behind i squeeze his anal glands everytime i bathe him the smell goes away for 1 day then he stinks everything up again it is a never ending cycle.

    • ANSWER:
      Unfortunately English Bulldog's have a tendency to smell! You can use special wipes for his face and jowls and the folds on his face. They tend to develop infections if not kept very clean.and dry. Yeast or another fungus will form and cause a horrible odor. And yeast and other fungi can spread throughout his whole body and skin. You may want to check with a vet to get special shampoo that will kill the yeast or fungus. The weekly bath may not take care of any fungus completely. You shouldn't have to express his anal glands weekly.

  29. QUESTION:
    Do your pups get eye boogers?
    I think mine might have allergies so I have a vet appointment, but every morning and throughout the day I have to clean the goobers out of their eyes!!! Does anyone else have this problem and how normal is it?

    • ANSWER:
      Well, normal depends on the amount and even the breed of dog that you have.

      "Eye Boogers" as you call them might be the natural release of protein that for example you and I have when we wake up in the morning.

      "Tearing" can also cause "eye boogers" and can be caused by a simple food allergy or other allergen such as pollen or even an allergy to something that you're wearing or a "contact allergy" from any number of inside or outside elements that the dog may come into contact with.

      If you find that your dog has excessive tearing and staining around the eye in addition to the "eye boogers" your dog may be dealing with an eye infection caused by bacteria or yeast which is very common among breed specific dogs such a poodles, long haired small breeds like a Shitzu, Maltese, Sheep dogs, Chows and the like. One of the most common yeast or bacterial infections is "Ptyrosporin" or "Red Yeast" which causes the deep reddish-brown stain that you normally see on poodles for example. Your vet can recommend topical eye ointments like Terramycin for bacterial infection which is commonly sold over the counter and running for about at stores like Petsmart.

      Terramycin combines a potent antibiotic called Oxytetracycline HCI with Polymixin B sulfate in a special petroleum base for a broad-spectrum defense against conjunctivitis, keratitis, corneal ulcer, and secondary bacterial complications of distemper all of which can cause the excessive "eye boogers" that you've been noticing on your dog.

      Disorders of the eye can be congenital, infectious, neoplastic, traumatic, immunologic, or idiopathic (of unknown cause). Some have no health implications, while others can cause blindness so naturally I would strongly advise that you contact your local vet.

      Breed specific dogs like a Chow which I had owned and had just passed away just over three weeks ago ( http://www.youtube.com/user/Kpup1511 ) are known for having eye problems that also cause excessive "eye boogers" and the tearing of the eye caused by what's called "Entropion" which is the inward rolling of the eyelid, most commonly the lower lid. This in turn irritates the surface of the eye (the cornea) and may ultimately cause visual impairment, ulcers, blindness and other assorted eye related problems.

      And to borrow from the University of Prince Edward Island animal studies program:

      Entropion is seen in the Akita, American Staffordshire terrier, Pekingese, bulldog, pomeranian, pug, Japanese chin, Shih tzu, Yorkshire terrier, Staffordshire bull terrier, dalmatian, old English sheepdog, rottweiler, Siberian husky, vizsla, weimaraner, toy and miniature poodle. It is also seen in hounds ( basset hound, bloodhound), spaniels ( Clumber spaniel, English and American cocker spaniel, English springer spaniel, English toy spaniel, Tibetan spaniel), and sporting breeds (Chesapeake Bay retriever, flat-coated retriever, golden retriever, Gordon setter, Irish setter, Labrador retriever).

      Entropion is common in giant breeds such as the Great Dane, Bernese mountain dog, mastiff, Saint Bernard, Newfoundland, and Great Pyrenees. In these breeds the central lower lid is often ectropic while the lid at the corners of the eye is entropic.

      What does entropion mean to your dog & you?

      The problem is usually evident before a year of age. Discomfort from entropion will cause increased tearing and squinting. Your dog may be sensitive to light and may rub at its eyes. Chronic irritation by the turned-in eyelid may cause corneal ulceration and scarring which is painful and, if not corrected, can impair vision.

      Dogs who have had surgical correction for a defect such as entropion may not be exhibited in the show ring.

      How is entropion diagnosed?

      The inrolling of the eyelid is readily apparent. Generally both eyes are affected. Depending on the degree of corneal irritation and the duration, there will be other signs such as those mentioned above. Your veterinarian will evaluate the degree of entropion and use flourescein dye to determine if there is any corneal ulceration.

      FOR THE VETERINARIAN: The use of topical ophthalmic anaesthetic to anaesthetize the cornea and conjunctiva will enable eliminatation of the spastic component of the entropion in order to better evaluate the anatomic component. This is important before surgery is performed.

      How is entropion treated?

      Entropion is corrected surgically. If possible it is best to delay surgery until the dog is an adult since the involved facial structures are still growing and changing.

      More than 1 operation may be required. It is better to correct the entropion conservatively and repeat the operation later if necessary, than to overcorrect causing ectropion. In breeds such as the chow chow that have particularly severe entropion related to heavy facial folds, several surgeries may be required.

      Now I can go on and on about various eye related item associated with dogs but perhaps it would be better if I pointed out a few links to you that would help to better explain to you the various issues that may cause excessive "eye boogers"

      The links will be posted below this message. I hope that this will at least help you to start to find a cause for your dogs condition.

      Good luck and I hope that it turns out to be something that can be treated easily.

      K-Pup

  30. QUESTION:
    My bulldog puppy has little red bumps on his belly, does anybody know what they are from?

    • ANSWER:
      2 of my puppies have this and they are either mosquitoes or biting flies. I have one pup with a thick/double coat and she doesn't have it. Mom had it on her back in the form of scabs. Benadryl has a spray and I use it and they seem to be unaffected with itching or noticing. I wouldn't run my pup in unless its debilitating. Look at the bumps if she/he will let you. Do they look like mosquito bites (not unlike our bites only smaller) same with flies? Flea bites will also make her/him itch everywhere. If your dog itches in only the spot affected they run the risk of getting a staph infection. If they are not just watch it, we have had such a wet spring/summer and lots of stuff is growing exponentially. I would also use brewer's yeast on her food for fleas and if you feed her some wet mix a little garlic or give a garlic tab (for fleas too). I have recently heard that if you are low on B, not sure which one, vitamin you get bit more by mosquitoes? I don't know if this is true but I give my dogs more food with B complex in it, I feed fresh and kibble. Good Morning America had someone on expelling these mysteries but for humans? Good luck

  31. QUESTION:
    My english bulldog has a lot of ear wax (not ear mites)?
    My english bulldog has a lot of ear wax (not ear mites) and I cleand them out eveynight and everyday the are dirty again I just can't keep them clean. does anyone know what it could be he goes to the vet this friday for his 12 week shot's and I will get them to check them then.

    • ANSWER:
      We had an english bulldog and she also had excessive earwax. If the earwax smells (gross but usually does) then it may be a bacterial infection. That's what it was on her (kind of a yeast inflection). The vet can give you a liquid solution that will not only clean out the excess was but make the ears sweet smelling also. Do have a culture done of the earwax, as another possiblility could be an allergy and only a vet will be able to tell you whether it's an infection or an allergy - and unfortunately bulldogs are prone to both.
      Good luck - they are the best dogs in the world!!!

  32. QUESTION:
    Which would you buy if you had no other choice?
    an English bulldog from a show breeder or a lab x standard poodle mix from healthy parents? Why?

    • ANSWER:
      This is a stupid question because there is never "no other choice." Even if you were looking at the last two dogs on this planet there is always the option to not get a dog at all.

      That aside, you couldn't pay me to take an English bulldog. As far as I'm concerned this is not a breed that is worth continuing as it is today. I'm all for to each his own, but when a breed is physically incapable of reproducing without intensive human assistance (ALL English bulldogs are born via C-section because their heads are too big and their hips too small for them to be able to give birth vaginally and MOST are impregnated through artificial insemination) then it's time for that breed to either undergo some very radical changes or to die out. My ethical issue with the whole reproductive thing aside, bulldogs are so prone to health problems, several of which can be severe, chronic, and expensive to treat. German shepherds, golden retrievers, labs, etc are "known" for their tendency towards hip dysplasia, but these "high risk" breeds don't even come close to the bulldog according to OFA dysplasia statistics. Only 19% of german shepherds, 20% of goldens, and 12% of labs tested by the OFA were found to be dysplastic compared to 73% of English bulldogs. Yet no one ever warns people who are thinking about getting a bulldog that this breed has one of the highest, if not THE highest, incidences of this disease. Lets not even get into the whole yeast infection/allergy/skin infection issue.

  33. QUESTION:
    my dog might possibly have an ear infection?
    i can't take him to the vet until tomorrow , anything i can do now ? to eirther lessen the pain or something i can't stand to see my dog like this

    btw his ear stinks and he screams a high pitch scream whenever you touch it

    • ANSWER:
      The smell coming form the ear is a sign of a pretty bad ear infection. Ear infections are common in "drop ear" breeds, or dogs with longer hair that prevents air circulation in the ear, or enables water to get trapped in it. Your vet will recommend an ear wash you can purchase. If you wanted to try to clean if tonight, to get the healing process started, you can mix water, distilled white vinegar, and rubbing alcohol together. You can put that mixture into the ear canal and massage at the base of the ear. Your dog will shake his head. You can then dry the area, do not push into the ear canal, with cotton balls. If the smell is similar to a yeast or a cheese type smell, then this is a yeast infection, and really better treated by a vet.

      Some dogs just get reoccurring ear infections, I have this problem with my bulldog. The best medicine here is prevention. When bathing, place cotton balls in the ears to avoid getting water trapped in there. Clean ears weekly and check them constantly, never use a q-tip instead use a cotton ball. Keep the ear canal free of hair, you can ask your vet or groomer to show you how to do this, its not difficult.

      To relieve your dog's pain, you can give him a small dose of aspirin, but do not give him any non-aspirin pain relievers they can be toxic to dogs, as can large doses of aspirin, so please be careful. I am including a website with a weight/mg chart in the source area.

  34. QUESTION:
    what do you do if your dog stinks all the time?
    my dog always stinks we have took him to the vet and 2 days later he stank and we have given him lots of bath'swhat do i do about it?
    we already got his anal glands released at the vet.

    • ANSWER:
      "Poor grooming of dogs with long, thick or corded hair can cause the haircoat to be a source of unpleasant odor. A coat that is not kept clean and groomed can trap dirt and other substances with unpleasant odors.
      Skin diseases can cause a dog to have increased or abnormal odor. Allergy can cause increased production of apocrine sweat, which imparts a musty odor. This condition, termed hyperhidrosis, can encourage yeast infection or bacterial skin infection and these micro-organisms produce odors as well. Dogs with seborrhea or keratinization defect, and dogs with deep skin folds(such as on the face of a bulldog), are very subject to secondary proliferation of bacteria or yeast on the skin surface, and these produce odors.
      Ear disease (otitis) can be a source of odor that varies from yeasty to one resembling sewage as either cerumen or pus accumulates in the diseased ear canal. Anal sac disease or excessive anal sac production can cause a very musty pungent odor. Anal sacs can become abscessed and infecting micro-organisms produce odor."

  35. QUESTION:
    Question for people with pugs?
    I am more than likely going to be getting a pug within the next year. I have seen pugs ranging from 0 - 00+ so I know what I will be spending on the actual dog...but what can I expect to have to pay for vet visits though, I've heard they have lots of health problems? I REALLY like this kind of dog though.

    • ANSWER:
      I have 2 pugs and several bulldogs..my pugs are the most awesome creatures in the world in my opinion. If you get good information ahead of time you will save a lot of money on vet bills.
      Eyes and ears and nose wrinkle are the main things that are hard to keep clean and can build up yeast infections.
      Some have problems with elongated soft pallatte so do your research and get a contract that protects you just in case of genetic inheritance. The other thing that is only inherited from the mother is a type of mange that can be a lifetime problem...Make sure you get this in a contract as well that if your dog ends up with this they give you your money back, it is only contracted through genetics.
      They can NOT take the heat so make sure you bring water and always carry lemon juice when you are walking them. if they start snorting too much this will loosen the phlem and help them breathe. These are the main things but they love to be with you and can't stand to be alone, make sure if you have a full time job that they have a companion, and a stuffed animal of their own! (in missouri you can get them for 0-500) AKC registered.

  36. QUESTION:
    English Bulldogs and wrinkle infections?
    My English Bulldogs wrinkle in his face is very red and looks sore. It also just looks nasty and it looks like it is sore. What could be the problem? and what do I need to do to help the poor guy!? :( I have been wiping it with baby wipes and then with a warm rag.

    • ANSWER:
      First, stop using baby wipes. They will make it even worse if it is sore and infected. Wrinkles need to be kept clean and dry-something that is sometimes tough with wrinkly dogs. Clean out with peroxide, dry thoroughly and apply a bit of neosporin to the area making sure your dog cannot lick the neosporin. If the irritated area smells yeasty and/or your dog seems to itch at it a bit you may want to try some mycelex or similar on it.
      Wrinkly dogs are prone to skin and yeast infections in tight wrinkles. Is this INSIDE a wrinkle or is it just along the eyes? Is there any kind of drainage from it?

  37. QUESTION:
    i have a american bulldog/mastiff who has recently been losing the black on her?
    nose and the fur is fading and becoming pink/red. is this a problem as am slightly concerned, it seems to be getting worse. also her gums are very pink ........

    • ANSWER:
      A dog's saliva contains enzymes that, due to a natural chemical reaction, can cause fur staining. (It's the same enzyme that causes tear stains in white dogs.)

      You may want to bring her to the vet. If she's frequently licking her nose, she may need to be treated for an allergy or yeast infection.

      In the meantime, make sure you keep the area clean, and make sure she always has a clean bowl of water. (If she tends to be a messy drinker, the saliva and debris in her water could be irritating her skin and reacting with her fur.)

  38. QUESTION:
    Dog licking other dogs ears?
    How can I get my Pekingese to stop licking my Bulldogs ears.
    It gives her ear aches and she gets yeast infection from the moistier.

    • ANSWER:
      Your Pekingese may actually be doing it to help the situation and probably senses the infection coming on. In the wild, dogs clean each others ears to avoid any problems. Your bulldog may just be prone to ear infections. There is a solution you can by at the vet or pet supply store to help clean out the ears. If you do this regularly, it should help.

  39. QUESTION:
    What rememdies could I use to treat a yeast infection of the tail?
    I have a 7 yr old English Bulldog who has been battling a yeast infection of his tail for several months now. As any typical bulldog owner knows, their tales usually cork-screw and point down. His tail curls up immitating that of a squirrel tail (hince his nickname as a puppy 'Squirrel'). With the tail rubbing against portion of his skin, it has created a bald spot and also a 'moisture pocket' where daily cleaning is needed. After his allergies flared a few months ago, the area became very infected and required antibiotic treatment. We've been on Pred, Cipro, Ketaconazole (anti-fungal) and topical ointments but nothing has cleared it up. The vet has suggested that if this does not clear up, a possible tail amputation may be in the near future. Any suggestions for other treatment options would be greatly appreciated!

    Aaron G.

    • ANSWER:
      my dog was just at the vet last weekend for what turned out to be a yeast infection ... the vet gave me a product called hibitane which i mixed with a bit of water, cleansed the area once a day and her yeast infection is gone ... you might want to google apple cider vinegar and see if that is something you might want to add to the dogs food ... i had my dog on apple cider vinegar for quite a while and she never had yeast infections and her ear infections became non-existent as well ... she is off apple cider vinegar currently and within a month the yeast infection happened ...

  40. QUESTION:
    French Bulldog constanly licking paws?
    My Frenchie keeps licking his paws. Is there anything I can do to stop this.

    • ANSWER:
      I have two frenchies and one of them has had lifelong problems with itchy feet and will chew them until they bleed. Their veterinarian (also their breeder) has suggested food changes as it may be allergies to the ingredients. That did not help, so we are nearly certain that it is pollen and other airborne allergens since it seems to be the worst in the spring time and fall. When she chews them, they stay wet and will sometimes get yeast infections or other fungi growing between her toes and this makes them itchier.

      We have managed to get on top of it with the following routine:

      - 25 mg Benadryl tablet twice a day (check with vet before administering ANY drugs)
      - Nizoral foot bath once a weeks to kill the fungus. Rub the shampoo in between her toes and let it stand for about 15min then rinse. Make sure they are fully dried with a towel.
      - Hibatane soap (low sudsing soap, available through your vet or drug store). I make sure to clean her feet at least every other day to keep dirt and other icky stuff out of her feet.
      - E-Collar: for when she is unsupervised, we usually put a cone collar on so she cannot chew at her feet. I would not suggest her wearing for extended periods, like when everybody is at work.

      Good luck!

  41. QUESTION:
    Allergies or Yeast infection in my English Bulldog?
    I rescue this english bulldog about a week ago she was in bad shape. The people had her had trade her to a pitt bull to this guy, and he keep her 4 days and then post her up to sale. I went and look at her and of course she look so bad i just couldn't leave her in the shape she was in, so i brought her and the price i gave for her i could of brought a new healthy pup , but i just couldn't leave her with those sad eyes saying help me. So i brought her home and right off she went to sliding her but across the floor and like humping things and scratching , she never stop the whole night so i got up at 300 am and gave her a really good bath , her tits was red and she had like a rash on her belly and between her tits you can see she has had several litter of pups so i guessing she was use just for a breed dog. i use to work for a vet when i was young while i was in nursing school so i knew a little that she had some type of infection so i took her to the vet and she gave her some yeast infection medical and said that is why she was biting at her paws and why her stomach was broke out. I went and brought her some 5 star dog food, she also gave her a shampoo that i was to bath her twice a week, and some ear medicine. and gave some medicated wipes for her folds. and advice me to give her 50 mg of bendryl a day. so i have done every thing i was told to do for her its been a week and i have not seen no change in her i call the vet today and she told me that it really hadn't had time to work. I so worried about her. anyone know anything else i might could do for her. any advice would be greatly appericate.

    • ANSWER:
      English bull dogs are a pretty unhealthy breed. Its not uncommon for them to have allergies but its more common for a poorly cared for bull to get a yeast infection. The shampoo they gave you is most likely an anti-fungal shampoo, usually when you bathe them you leave the lathered up shampoo on them for 5-10 minutes before rinsing off. This allows the pores (pours? I have no idea how to spell that lol) to open up and the anti-fungal medication in it to work on killing the yeast. This type of dog commonly gets skin fold infections if the folds are not cleaned on a regular basis. The baths work wonders on these guys so keep it up. I know its hard to not see a difference right away but you are greatly reducing the yeast on her body. The medicated wipes will help too because you cant get the shampoo that close to her eyes. Then benadryl is keeping her from scratching herself to death so keep that up too. Everything you are doing is great, you saved this poor dog. At her recheck appointment when things are looking better you can ask the vet about allergy diets, my vet recommends hypoallergenic diets for some dogs. I had my dog on california natural lamb and rice which is a high end allergy diet only to find out later that he's allergic to rice. We did an allergy test on him, Spectrum labs, I'll attach a link. I was so happy that i did this test when i got the results to because i found out that he's allergic to all the hypoallergenic foods like sweet potato, fish, rabbit, rice, and wheat. So I could have spent tons of time and money through trial and error with all these foods. So I would recommend this test if these problems come back after you get them fixed. A good way to tell is ears, most dogs get ear infections if they have food allergies. You and your vet are doing a great job, I cant think of anything else that we would do at my work. I hope this helps you feel better. Good luck

  42. QUESTION:
    Are French bulldogs a good breed generally?

    • ANSWER:
      Frenchies are a good breed in general, however they do have certain needs that some other breeds do not and have a lot more health concerns than most other breeds.
      French bulldogs are "brachiocephalic" so they have a short, scrunched face- this leads to some upper-airway issues(as well as overheating easliy), such as

      1)Hypoplastic trachea (small sized windpipe),

      2) redundant pharyngeal tissue (that is part of why they sometimes snore),

      3)Unusually long soft palates(that usually need surgical correction)

      other issues that arise are:

      Skin fold dermatitis: any breed with lots of skin and some wrinkles can get infections (yeast or bacterial) in their skin folds if they are not kept clean constantly.

      Bracheocephalic breeds are also prone to :

      Cherry Eye (bulging tear glands in their eye),

      Exopthalmus (eyes bulging out of their eye sockets more than usual predisposing them to proptose globe), and

      Medial Patellar Luxation (when the knee cap doesn't stay in the patellar grove of the knee, popping out and causing pain and trouble walking)

      Almost all of these can be counteracted slightly by getting a dog from a reputable breeder (which is expensive and long process) but if it saves you from spending the money to fix these above genetic problems after you buy the pup. We see very few of these dogs EVER without some of these issues- it is part of how they are put together.

      Pros are: frenchies are usually clean, happy, loving, and as sweet as can be- great pets if they are healthy.

  43. QUESTION:
    English bulldog's face fold -- black gunk? ?
    I recently adopted a 6-year old English Bulldog (around Christmas). When I got him, one of the folds on his face seemed to need attention, so I have been cleaning it daily with no luck. I started out with a q-tip and apple cider vinegar and applied it directly to the fold. That didn't seem to help, so I ordered something called "pledgets" by Malaseb. They're basically medicated pads that you can use for lots of purposes. They really aren't helping either, though.

    I've read about bulldogs being prone to yeast infections in their folds, but I'm not sure that a yeast infection is his problem. Every time I wipe the fold, I get crusty black gunk out. Is that typical of a yeast infection??

    I will take him to the vet if I can't get it to improve, but wanted to try to fix it myself first. It's a fairly deep fold and deeper than the one on the other side of his face. Any advice would be awesome.

    • ANSWER:
      Yep, Bulldogs are known for skin problems, especially in the skin folds. If I were you, I would take the dog to the Vet. Unless this is already a massive infection, he will probably prescribe Panalog ointment to put in the folds. Don't waste your money on the over the counter junk with this situation. It may cost you more in the long run than getting the proper treatment from the Vet.

  44. QUESTION:
    Ive always wanted a British Bulldog as a pet, but are there any issues making them difficult to look after?

    • ANSWER:
      British Bulldog?

      Do you mean a Bulldog? Like this: http://images.google.com/images?hl=en&q=bulldog+photos&um=1&ie=UTF-8&sa=X&oi=image_result_group&resnum=1&ct=title ?

      If so, then yes, they are one of the most expensive dogs to own due to their health problems.
      They tend to have severe allergies and skin problems like topical yeast infections.
      They can have severe breathing problems. This means that they cannot be in hot or cold weather. The cannot be overly exercised.
      Their joints can also be bad (hip dysplasia, elbow dysplasia), especially with bad breeding.
      They are highly prone to lymphatic problems, including lymphnode cancer.

      Their large heads make nearly every litter c-section. The short legs and stout body make artificial insemination the norm for breeding. Because of these expenses, puppies from responsible breeders generally start at about 00 and go up from there.

      I recommend taking some time to learn about the breed. http://www.thebca.org is the best place to start.

      GL!
      http://www.pbrc.net/breeding3.html to learn about good breeders.

  45. QUESTION:
    What do I use for my dog who has a yeast infection on her feet?
    My 2 year old Boxer has a yeast infection (Dx'ed) in both her back paws. I don't have money to pay for prescriptions. What is a very good, yet inexpensive home remedy?

    Here's some things I have heard...
    -plain yogurt
    -apple vinegar
    -Selson blue
    Home remedies do work. Most active ingredients that are in your expensive medicines are things you can find around your house. To Joanplus... go away.
    I used Nutragena T-Gel and it cleared it up. Thanks for all the help.

    • ANSWER:
      I have a 3 year old Bulldog, and he's had yeast infections in his ears, and on his paws. The vet told me it's pretty common for his breed, and sent me home with some acetic acid 5% solution for his ears (acetic acid, by the way, is vinegar), and some anti-fungal wipes for his feet. These two items cost a total of .00 at my vet, and they cleared up his infection over the course of about a month..

      While I agree with you that some home remedies do work, yeast is particularly hard to get rid of with out using harsh chemicals or medications. Yeasts are made up of roots and spores. It's the spores that can remain dormant on or in your dog and flare up, causing another infection after the first one is cleared up. It's nealy impossible to kill these spores without an anti-fungal mediction.
      While you are absolutely right that a lot of our expensive prescriptions come from natural items "around the house", medicine has found a way to take these natural items and take out their active compounds or chemicals, and concentate them into a cure. Good examples of these medicines would be morphine, penicillin, and Taxol (the cancer treatment). Taxol comes from the yew tree, and it a very effective treatment for cancer, but in order to get enough paclitaxel (the active compound) for one dose, a person would need to somehow ingest one entire tree. Penicillin may have been discovered on a moldy orange, but to get enough medicine for one dose, a person would have to eat literally pounds and pounds of moldy oranges. Do you see where I'm going with this?
      Cider vinegar may seem like a good remedy, especially since I mentioned that the ear medicine from the vet was, in essence, vinegar. You should know that a yeast infection leaves your dog's skin somewhat raw, and putting vinegar on it is going to sting and burn. It will also inflame the area and could potentially hurt your dog more than help. Cider vinegar is also a fermented product, and will contain yeasts naturally. This probably won't help your dog. The solution from the vet is pure and sterile, medical grade acetic acid solution. It still stings and burns, but it will ultimately help.
      Plain yogurt, with no sugar or fruit added is a wonderful addition to any dog's diet, occasionally. Yogurt with "live and active cultures" is full of the good bacteria that can combat the bad bacteria in the digestive tract. It's really useful when yourdog has to be on an antibiotic for an illness. Yeast, however, is not a bacteria. It is a fungus.
      Selsun Blue is a popular dandruff shampoo, available just about anywhere. And it's true that the suspected, though not proven, cause of dandruff is a yeast-like organism called Pityrosporum Ovale. See the SPORUM in there? Sounds like a yeast, doesn't it? Unfortunately, it isn't. The active ingredient, selenium sulfide, only prevents this particular organism from being able to grow on skin. The yeast on your dog's paws is probably a strain of Candida or tinea, which require different medications. A tube of Monistat cream will most likely work, since it is specifically made for treating Candida, but unless you know for sure that that is what your dog has, I'd just get the stuff from the vet. Monistat has to be left on the skin, uncovered, in order to work as a topical treatment. This means that you'd somehow have to keep your dog from licking it. One of those radar dish collars would probably help. I'd think that soaking your dog's feet in Epsom salts, then drying thoroughly with paper towels and a hair dryer, and applying the cream would work best. You have to also keep in mind that the only place on your dog's body that can sweat is the paws, and so they will be constantly moist since it's summertime. You will have to wash, epsom salt, dry, and reapply the cream several times a day.

      I know you care about your dog, and I'm glad you are trying to help him/her. I just want you to be informed about the decisions you are considering so that you can do the most for your pet. I hope he or she gets well soon!

  46. QUESTION:
    My dogs get yeast infections in their ears?
    In October my bichon got a yeast infection in his ears. In January, my cocker spaniel got it. Now it's April and my poodle has it. My vet tells me that this is not contagious, but is a "bacteria of opportunity." If it isn't contagious, why are all of my dogs getting it? Is there anything I can do to prevent this? It makes the dogs very uncomfortable, and my poor poodle screams bloody murder every time I put the drops in. (He's always been a drama king, but it's embarrassing, and I'm wondering what the neighbors are thinking!) Thanks for answering.
    Yes, dear, I asked the vet and didn't like the answer. I'm asking for others' experience, not "medical" opinion.

    • ANSWER:
      Yeast infections are not contagious. All dogs normally have a small number of yeast in their ears. If the skin inside the ears becomes damaged the yeast overgrows causing irritation and that gross smell. Things that can lead to this include allergies, wet ear canals and the conformation of the ear (floppy ears). The 3 breeds you have are all predisposed to having ear infections (otitis) because of their ear conformation and because these breeds are more likely to have allergies. You are going to battle this but it can be managed. Ask your vet about an ear solution you can use to lower the pH of the ear canal. Yeast do not grow well in an acidic environment. If a dog comes in with ear problems first I take a swab and look at it under the microscope to make sure that yeast is the problem. Then I have the techs clean the ears and show the owner how to do it. We send home a non irritating ear cleaner and either an ear cream or ear drops. We usually have the owner flush the ear every 3 days for 2 weeks and apply the cream or drops 1-2 times daily for ten days. I recheck the ears in 2 weeks. If the ears are very irritated and painful I prescribe an anti inflammatory like rimadyl. At the recheck if the ears appear to have healed I send home a different ear cleaner and the owner is instructed to flush the ears every 1-2 weeks. This ear cleaner lowers the pH and helps prevent yeast from growing, This ear cleaner can be irritating if the dog has an ear infection so we wait until we are sure the ears are healed before having owners use it. My own bulldog is an allergic dog prone to yeast infections. This system works well with him unless I forget to clean the ears regularly. Another thing that I will suggest in your case. Make sure that your dogs groomer is plucking the ear hair. Your breeds tend to have quite a bit of hair in the canals which can make ear infection more likely and more severe. I know that this is frustrating for you and your dogs, If your dogs are showing other signs of allergies like paw licking or scratching talk to your vet about changing the diet and/or allergy testing your dogs. It can be difficult especially with a dog that hates his ears cleaned but keep up the regular cleaning. Chronic ear infections can lead to narrowing of the ear canal and severe complications, Oh and do not use hydrogen peroxide. Hydrogen peroxide can be extremely irritating and damaging to tissues. The only use for hydrogen peroxide in my practice is to get the blood off my lab coat.

  47. QUESTION:
    hi i want 2 know why my bulldog smells so bad?
    he just smell evan wen i take him a bath he still stinks...hes only 5 month

    • ANSWER:
      There are usually three main areas that make dogs smell. The front end, the middle bit and the back end!
      Lets start at the front. The mouth. Bad breath or hallitosis can be caused by poor diet, poor hygiene, an infection or liver and kidney problems. Your dog is only young so most of these are unlikely. That bad smell from the mouth can be transferred all over the body because dogs groom themselves with their tongue.
      Now the middle bit. Essentially the skin. Smelly skin can be caused by bacterial or yeast overgrowth, poor hygiene, poor diet, hypothyroidism or a sebacious gland problem. Most of these will need to be checked by a vet.
      Finally the back end! Anal glands can be a real problem in dogs and very smelly. Again a vet will need to check these. Flatulence can can also be a big problem but you tend to hear that as well as smell it!
      To begin with you could try changing diet but be careful not to change too much too quick. You could cause more problems than you solve. Stay away from any treats or snacks. None are good for dog no matter who makes them. In the wild dogs do not snack! And they definitely don't have treats!
      Most of the other problems will need some kind of veterinary intervention but insist on having tests done first before going for any kind of medication. It may cost more to begin with but could save a fortune in the long run in that you will get the correct treatment right from the start.

  48. QUESTION:
    Tear stain products on large dogs?
    I have an 8 month old, almost solid white, American Bulldog with horrible tear stains. I have been using topical pads and liquids for about 4 months with no success. I was thinking of trying the Angel Eyes, but it seems like it's only for small dogs. Here are the feeding directions by weight:
    2-5 lbs- 1/4 tsp
    5-8 lbs- 1/2 tsp
    8-12 lbs- 3/4 tsp
    over 12 lbs- 1 tsp

    My puppy is close to 60 lbs, I just don't think giving her 1 tsp daily would work. I mean that would mean she'd be getting the same amount as a 12 lb dog. Does anyone have any suggestions about Angel Eyes or about removing tear stains off of a large dog with very short fur????? She is a gorgeous dog and I just hate seeing those ugly stains on her pretty face.
    I went onto the ANgel Eyes website, and the small bottle (for ) is 30 grams. My girl would have 1 tsp a day, so this bottle would last only 6 DAYS!!! I don't think I could afford to do that. Maybe I will ask the vet and see if there is a more affordable method for the long run.

    • ANSWER:
      I use Eye Envy and buy it from this site. It works great for me and doesn't have anything in it that will hurt my dogs eyes. Here are some questions and answers from her site and the link to the site I purchase from. I didn't want to give angel eyes to my dog because I was not sure if it might have something in it that would hurt her kidneys.

      Questions and Answers

      Eye Envy is the most effective product for curing runny, ugly tear stains on your dog or cat. Our solution removes tearstains effectively, safely and gently. Eye Envy is an eye treatment solution that is non-irritating and proven to prevent eye leakage and discharge, quickly and through an easy to use method that your pet will thank you for. Eye Envy also comes in an herbal version. It is guaranteed to be effective, endorsed by veterinarians, catteries, and groomers the world over. If your pet is prone to tearstains, Eye Envy is for you. It is also effective in treating urine stains, red yeast infections, food stains, helping droolers, and of course for that unsightly brown goop around the eyes that affects dogs and cats everywhere.

      Frequently Asked Questions

      Q: What causes excessive tearing and staining:
      A: Staining can be caused by a variety of things:

      Clogged or Shallow Tear Ducts: Studies indicate that 20-25% of small dogs and cats are born with closed of shallow tear ducts. Tears overflow because there the eyelid space is not deep enough to contain them.
      Excessive Tearing: When the face hair is wet from excessive tearing, it becomes a breeding ground for bacteria and yeast infections (AKA: Red Yeast, which causes deep reddish-brown stains); Low grade bacteria infections may also cause excessive tearing.
      Cutting Teeth: Cutting teeth may cause changes in the head & mouth structure of your pet, placing pressure on the tear ducts.
      Irritation & Allergies: Some animals get hair or eyelashes into their eyes causing irritation. Many breeds are susceptible to allergies. Shampoos and other chemicals can also irritate their eyesSome foods cause allergic reactions; animals may also build an allergic reaction over time to a type of food.
      Water: Water with high mineral levels causes staining
      Food & Treats: Diet can play a significant role in tearing. Many commercial foods contain additives, preservatives and food coloring. This could lead to staining.
      Fleas: Fleas survive in moisture, which they get from the eye or moth area. This could cause irritation and in addition red stains left behind may be from flea feces. These are just a few reasons. There are MANY more!!
      Q: What is Eye Envy so different that all the other products that I've bought and don't work?
      A: Eye Envy works at the true problem, a bacteria infection. Eye Envy contains a cleanser, an astringent (to dry the area) and herbal flower extract (acts as a natural antibiotic) and an antibacterial.

      Eye Envy is a topical tear stain remover. Other products are often masked as palatable supplements, taking months to work and requiring your pet to ingest antibiotics (e.g. tylan, tylosin as tartrate, collidal silver).

      Q: What if I've used bleach or peroxide to clean the area around the eyes?
      A: Bleach/Peroxide make the hair shaft very pourous, causing the stain to set into the hair. Eye Envy will only lighten the areas previously damaged by bleach or peroxide, but all regrowth will be clean.

      PLEASE do not use peroxide, bleach or woolite on your animals.

      Q: Is Eye Envy safe to use on my pregnant dog or cat?
      A: Yes. Since Eye Envy is applied externally, it is 100% safe to use on pregnant, lactating and even small kittens (over the age of 7 weeks).

      Q: Should Eye Envy be refrigerated? If so, how long is it's shelf life?
      A: NO WE CARRY THE BRAND NEW NO REFRIDGERATION REQUIRED PRODUCT. THIS PRODUCT HAS A SHELF LIFE OF 3-4 MONTHS.

      Q: Is Eye Envy applied inside the eyes?
      A: No. Eye Envy is to be applied externally only.

      Q: What happens if a small amount gets into my pets eyes?
      A: There is nothing to worry about is some solution gets into your pets eyes. The ingredients are safe and have been tested.

      Q: How many pads come in a jar?
      A: There are approximately 28-30 pads per jar. Our pads are made of special material to avoid any "fuzz" from getting into your pets eyes.

      Q: Can I use Eye Envy on my dog/cats legs, tail, mouth area? Is it safe?
      A: Yes. The ingredients will not harm your animal. Also, EE can be used for chin acne and urine stains.

      Q: Should I refrigerate my product when it arrives?
      A: NO WE CARRY THE BRAND NEW NO REFRIDGERATION REQUIRED PRODUCT. THIS PRODUCT HAS A SHELF LIFE OF 3-4 MONTHS. .

      Q: I have a white dog, do you recommend the powder?
      A: Yes! With any white animals it is recommended to use both the solution and the powder.

      Q: Does Eye Envy fade/bleach colored animals?
      A: No. The produt does not contain any peroxides or bleaching agents. Your pets hair will not discolor.

      FREE HOMEMADE TREATS ARE INCLUDED MADE WITH ONLY THE FINEST INGREDIENTS.

  49. QUESTION:
    American Bulldog with "horns" on her toe pads. Really long hard callouses, along with flaky skin...?
    These things are horrific...

    We rescued her from a not so good situation- we werent even going to keep her, just send her to a bulldog rescue... but she's too damn sweet.

    I took her to a "vet" that i use here. I use her because she's inexpensive for routine things, the only other vet is insanely expensive. Anyway, this vet said it was nothing, and that it would clear up on its own, she gave her a months worth of antibiotics? for nothing?

    She has a yeast infection, iam about 90% sure on top of it all. She's got that brown funk in any dark moist place on her body, and pink/red skin that smells yeasty. I told the vet this, and she insisted no, it was as skin infection. i tried the antibiotics but NOTHING changed.

    i switched her diet... got rid of all allergens. Thinking that the horns on her feet, the yeast infection, and the INSANELY flaky skin is caused by grains. She's doing well on the new diet... but these horns on her feet are awful.

    side note: when she eats grains she gets sores between her toes, open wounds... I think its pododermatits...

    Has anyone else had a dog with a similar issue? These horns, or callouses are horrific. Theyre like almost two inches long and jut off the sides of her toes, so they turn in weird ways. I tried using pumace stones and files to grate them, but theyre too hard! I think i might try a dremmel tool...

    IAM TAKING HER TO A NEW VET WITH MY TAX RETURN MONEY... so dont go there. Iam just wondering if anyone has ever seen anything similar and how they delt with the callouses.

    • ANSWER:
      for the yeast infection you need to wash AND DRY the folds in her skin frequently

      as for the callouses- one of my dogs has a CORN thats similar but (I'm not sure the same) and bag balm softens it enough to allow it to be filed off (it regrows)
      Google Corn & greyhound - they are common on retired greys so the rescue sites have advice on them


bulldog yeast infection