Dog Food Without Yeast

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    Samoyed owners/breeders or other dogs prone to bloat what do you feed your dog?
    I read that samoyeds can get bloat. And that with dogs prone to bloat that dog food without yeast, soy and alfalfa is best. I also read to avoid foods that contain fat as one of the first four ingredients
    and that contain citric acid.

    So my question is this what do you feed your dog?

    • ANSWER:
      I do not have Samoyeds, but I do have Danes.

      I have heard that Samoyeds are prone to bloat. But I have not heard that last bit. I'm a believer in bloat being caused more by action than food. A dog getting a lot of vigorous exercise too soon after a meal, for example. Not what that meal was.

      My Danes are on Diamond Lamb and Rice formula.

  2. QUESTION:
    whats the best hypoallergenic dog food I can get without a prescription?
    my dog has a skin irritation (theres yeast present) and she is on antibiotics and has to be bathed every 5 days with a special shampoo. My vet said try a different dog food but he didn't want to prescribe anything yet. we're doing meds first, but I do want to change her food. she's eating Beneful for mature dogs now but that may be one of the causes. can anyone recommend a good dry dog food.

    • ANSWER:
      I can't recommend a real good dry dog food right now, but my dogs stomach was really upset, purebred dogs vs commercial dog food. After about a month with dog foods, I decided to cooked real, lamb and rice for him for about 2 months, and later slowly introduced him into dry iams, (lamb and rice). It was quite remarkable how he switched from my cooking to iams, then to a affordable dog food brand that he totally loved. He was a beautiful Belgium Sheppard.

      The following source will definately lead you in the right direction though. If I can't paste it here just go to the pet category and look for the top answerer. Chetco is an excellent person and will respond to all pet situations.

  3. QUESTION:
    What is a good diet dry dog food?
    I have a three year old corgi who is beginning to be overweight. She is allergic to chicken, corn, yeast,turkey, and lamb. I need a weight loss dog food without the ingredients.
    She eats the recommended serving on the bag for her breed' s average weight and spends 1-2 hrs running around at our barn. She also occasionally swims in our pool.
    Also she eats blue buffalo fish and sweet potato formula.

    • ANSWER:
      Blue Buffalo Wilderness Salmon. It won't help with the weight problem, you need to read the bag to see how much food the dog needs according to his weight, and walk him more.

      ********************Check the ingredients there might be some of that stuff

  4. QUESTION:
    What are some good and healthy mixes you can feed a dog?
    I know that some people mix a raw egg, cottage cheese, or carrots to a dogs dry food every-so-often to mix up their meals. But I'm wondering what foods are safe and unsafe for doing this.

    And if you mix dog food with people food...please tell me what you do, I might try it!
    thanks!
    :)

    • ANSWER:
      http://www.dogaware.com/dogfeeding.html#addfood
      http://www.dog-obedience-training-review.com/best-dog-food.html
      Firstly...you will need to include a calcium supplement... They are not expensive, you can get them in a powder form, and just mix them in.

      What I do is go to the butcher and get a kilo of offal mince, or ask your butcher if he does up a pet food mince.... this will be made of all the bits he cant sell..and will be fine for your dog.

      Also ask your parents to save all of the left over vegetables your family had for the week, potato peelings, the end bits of brocoll/cauliflower , carrot heads, and anything else, any other leftovers off your plates of anything (without bones)... put them in a container in the fridge... any vegetables, meat, pasta are good, as long as it is not spicy.

      Chop all of them up into very small pieces, cover with water, and boil them until they are very soft. Then add the mince, more water and keep boiling....add a few handfuls of uncooked rice or pasta (or both) and if its dry... more water.

      Add the calcium supplement.

      Once the pasta or rice is soft is fine. You can keep it covered in the fridge for week and just spoon out what you need for you pup every night. And at the end of the week you have collected the weeks leftovers/peelings and you just do it again.

      A couple of spoon fulls of olive oil wouldn't hurt...very good for the coat.

      Maybe throw an egg or two in some weeks...again, very good.

      Just to vary it and add something else...occasionally I add a tin of tuna or sardines

      4kg of pet chicken mince (from chicken processors who grind up bone and all)
      1 kilo puree vegetable (1000 grams)
      quarter kilo puree fruit (250 grams)
      ¾ Cup flake barley and 1 ½ Cups roll oats, soaked in 2 cups warm water
      half kilo offal (usually beef liver)
      4 eggs-with shells
      2 Tablespoons Cod Liver Oil or Vitamin A supplement
      4 Tablespoons Flax Oil
      2 Tablespoons Brewers Yeast
      2 Tablespoons Mudgee Dolomite Powder
      2 Tablespoons Seaweed Kelp Meal or Powder
      Vitamin C to equate to 50mg per kg per day
      1 cup yogurt
      Mix and freeze this mix in 2-3 day batches.
      Unfreeze the mix and add Vitamin E at the mealtime.
      (200 i.u. for 25 kg, 100 i.u. for 10kg puppy)
      Other ingredients you can use as toppings for variety; depending upon local availability:
      Sardines or canned fish
      cottage cheese
      junket rennet milk

      I will sometimes put in a bit of gravy

  5. QUESTION:
    What is your opinion about laboratory grown meat?
    Is it a possible eventual solution to the factory
    farm situation? Would you feed your companion
    animal cat or dog food made from non-slaughtered
    lab-meat. Would you encourage non-vegetarian
    people to switch to this type of flesh in an attempt
    to end factory farming?
    Matt, please educate me on how
    you think it may be ethically
    problematic. I haven't heard anything
    about that yet.
    Reva P. please read the question a little more carefuly. I'm talking about
    synthethic flesh that is not an animal.
    I'm a vegan and animal rights activist
    I would never insult other veg'ans.
    Nor would I suggest eating anything
    that is really an animal.
    Cristy I understand your concern and
    I share it. However it leads us to the complex issue of which is the greater
    evil. Since only 1% of animal deaths
    that occur are due to testing I think it
    may be worth the sacrifice in order
    to save the multitudes of farm animals
    that are slaughtered. I also think that
    this testing you are referring to would
    be temporary. It becomes a question
    of whether a minimal amount of attrition
    is worth saving billions of lives.

    G.G. I agree. I wouldn't touch it with a
    ten foot pole but just think of a world
    in which replicant flesh has made
    murder unnecessary.

    • ANSWER:
      As a vegetarian I personally would have nothing to do with it!

      Did you know that work is already being done on this kind of thing? I'm not gonna dig up links but I know companies have ramped up the same kind of tissue culturing techniques used for things like burn victim skin grafts! What's slowed major commercial exploitation is that they can't get the texture they want.

      I actually would consider this a viable method to replace not just factory farms but all direct animal exploitation (with all the cruelty that entails). Yes, when this stuff actually hits the market I would encourage meat eaters to use the stuff instead of 'natural' animal flesh. This will be (along with the veggie analogs) the advance that encourages folks to stop killing animals for food! I could see a future where folks would be upset about eating meat from 'real' animals. Wasn't there a Star Trek or such that had someone upset about about eating real dead animal instead of replicated flesh?

      That's the real promise of this kind of technology!

      Edit:

      The first two answerer's aren't considering that with tissue culture you would KNOW that the product didn't contain excess hormones or contaminants. Would you rather eat a slab of dead cow that could be full of prions, viruses, bacteria, anti-biotics, hormones etc. or a lab tested and certified beeph steak? Think about it!

      Edit:

      In my usual style of making a long answer longer...

      Quorn is NOT genetically modified! It's a natural soil fungus that's grown in a manner similar to yeast. I'm not a big fan of Quorn but that bit of mis-information needs correcting.

      No animals need be killed for this stuff at all! It just takes ONE small tissue sample to start a culture with. When that tissue culture is large enough you divide it to start many new cultures. Think of something like a sourdough starter where a small piece is always saved to make the next batch of sourdough. A plant based analogy would be Geraniums. They don't normally set viable seed so every single plant you see for sale was actually started from a tissue culture!! The 'quicker' readers will realize we're talking *real* cloning here. I'm glad Toph caught the potential environmental benefits of the stuff! I hoped someone would. Beebs might be interested to know that cow mammary glands have gotten this treatment and so have fish. You still wouldn't be a vegetarian but you could have your raw cow milk and fish without harming animals. Here's a *real* eye-opener, human mammary glands could get this treatment to produce MASS quantities of human milk! All it takes is one healthy female volunteer willing to get jabbed with a biopsy needle. Interesting concept huh? No more babies getting fed cow milk or formula! Sorry perverts, no giant breasts involved here, just a thin layer of gland tissue grown on a substrate that constantly expresses milk.

      All this (and more) is *possible* right now. For us veggies I've seen tissue cultures of lettuce and bell pepper. That'll hush some meaty trolls that scream about us killing plants!
      What's stopping troubleshooting and more development is money; not just money to ramp up production but also money interests freaking about their own pocketbooks. The meat/dairy industry is (rightly) worried about the potential as is anyone involved in agriculture. There were some folks that 'pooped' themselves when they found out some of this stuff has already been eaten by humans (lab researchers).
      I've been following this "sci-fi" technology for years since (as some know) I'm opposed to *all* killing and this is a step in the right direction. What I *really* want is the ability to convert raw energy directly into food! (one of the ramifications of E=Mc squared)

  6. QUESTION:
    What should I feed my 3 year old female (fixed) lab/golden mix? She has a red/purple yeast rash on her belly.?
    I've been feeding her generic store brand food without problems, then another dog came in the house and I fed her leftovers of his Pedigree and I noticed this rash. Both dogs are flea-free and have had flea treatments. I have heard grain free food is a good idea, but looks expensive. How about cooking my own food? What would you recommend?

    • ANSWER:
      well try benedryl for the rash. 12.5 mg for every 10 lb of dog. See if this clears up the rash and helps with the itching. I would then suggest putting your dog on either Iams Healthy Naturals or going to a raw feed with vitamine suppliments.

  7. QUESTION:
    What is the best dry food to feed your dog when they have stomach issues?
    I have a 1 year old female yorkie. Every so often she has digestion issues. She has been to the vet had tests run and she is healthy. We are thinking that it is food allergies. What dry food would you recommend for a 6 pound yorkie (pretty picky)? When she is having her issues (mild spiting up or vomiting) what is a good thing to feed her? She is acting fine..........and still hungry but we are still in the testing stages of finding out what she is allergic to so she has the occasional vomiting.

    • ANSWER:
      Without knowing what your dog currently eats for food and treats, it is impossible to make a recommendation. Here are a few things you should know though.

      In dogs, there are allergies and intolerance's (like people being lactose intolerant). Allergies usually manifest in skin conditions, like hot spots, hair loss, itching, sores, ear infections, paw licking, and tear stains. Intolerance's usually show up in stomach problems, like vomiting and diarrhea. Both are diagnosed the same way, but an intolerance will clear up within days and allergy symptoms take up to three months to go away. Allergies can also be to things in the environment.

      First, you need to choose a food that has only one meat and one carbohydrate, both of which your dog has never eaten or not eaten in many months. Make sure to change or eliminate the treats as well. If the dog improves, then the current ingredients are ok, and you can try adding additional ingredients one at a time to see if you can find a trigger. If there is no improvement, your dog is allergic or intolerant of one or both ingredients, or has environmental allergies. If there is no improvement, you can try the trial again using different ingredients, or get medication from the vet to treat for environmental allergies.

      No matter what, you should start your dog on probiotics. Probiotics help support proper digestion and improve the immune system. This will help with allergies and general health. Fish oil is another important supplement. Fish oil is a natural inflammatory and can reduce swelling.

      Other possibilities are systemic yeast, acid reflux, or just plain eating too fast.

      If you suspect it is dietary, here are some brands to look into. Always read ingredient labels carefully, as each variety within the same brand can be drastically different.
      California Natural, Natural Balance (LID formulas only), Taste of the Wild (salmon or lamb only), Nutrisca, Nutrisource grain free, Innova Prime, Precise Holistic grain free, Orijen 6 fish, Acana pacifica, Go Natural.

      Here is a good article for you on allergies and systemic yeast
      http://www.greatdanelady.com/articles/systemic_yeast_mini_course.htm

  8. QUESTION:
    How can I cure a yeast infection in my dog's ear?
    I have a shih tzu who has chronic yeast infections in his ear. The vet isn't helping. The infection keeps coming back. What are some natural remedies I could try?

    • ANSWER:
      Zymox Otic with hydrocortisone is an enzyme treatment. It treats yeast and bacterial infections. Available online without a prescription.
      Feeding a grain free food also helps.
      Blue Buffalo Wilderness, Taste of the Wild, Canidae grain free, Wellness Core are some good brands.
      Eliminate grain in treats.

  9. QUESTION:
    What is the most effective way to treat my dog's yeast infection?
    Our dog is 5 years old now and for the last month or so, he's had a really bad yeast infection in his ears and around his chin. We've been giving him a prescription from the vet, but it doesn't seem to be working very well. Could you tell me how i can treat it for a long time without having to spend too much money on any kind of medicine?

    • ANSWER:
      FROM THE INSIDE:
      I'd first make sure he was on a high quality food without corn or wheat; these are very common empty additives; basically fillers with no nutritional value. They often cause nutritional imbalances and food allergies, making dogs more prone to infections of all types. Pretty much anything you pick up at the grocery store is going to have one or both.
      I suggest either Canidae All Life Stages:
      http://www.canidae.com/dogs/all_life_stages/dry.html
      Or Wellness by Old Mother Hubbard, either the fish and sweet potato or one of the allergy diets, initially, until you get his system straightened out:
      http://www.oldmotherhubbard.com/wellness/dog_index.html
      A tablespoon of plain yogurt on his food, once a day, helps re-establish beneficial bacteria in the intestinal tract. Often yeast gets out of control when the good bacteria as well as the bad have been killed during a course of antibiotics.
      Also try adding a tsp of apple cider vinegar to his water bowl, yeast will not flourish in an acidic environment.
      ON THE OUTSIDE:
      For an earwash my vet gave me this recipe:
      1 part apple cider vinegar
      1 part hydrogen peroxide
      1 part water
      (I combine 1/2 cup each in a clean empty dish soap bottle with the push-pull top, and refrigerate after using, then allow it to warm up on the counter a bit before re-using; discard any left over after one week and make a fresh batch)
      Fill the ear canal with this solution, massage the base of the ear, and allow the dog to shake its head, then wipe with cotton balls. Never stick a q-tip into a dogs ear.
      Yeast infection can be treated externally with over-the-counter creams for athlete's foot or vaginal yeast infections (lamisil is our personal favorte) you can smear that in the ears and dab it on his chin; just be sure to soak off any crusts first with a warm wet cloth.

  10. QUESTION:
    Anyone have a dog got a bad reaction to K9 Advantix?
    My Golden Retreiver seems to always get really down for about 24 hours after she gets her treatment. My other dog is fine, but my Golden is just not herself for a while after. She is very quiet, lies down alot like she doesn't feel good. She always tries to hide when she sees the tube. It's strange and tonight she is worse than usual.
    I'm calling the vet today and report my Goldens reaction and I will notify Bayer. Thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      Advantix can cause adverse reactions so beware. I have used it in the past and I lost a dog to it, not a Collie, a two and a half year old GSD. My dog had a reaction to it within a couple of hours after applying Advantix and began having seizures. This product poisoned him and affected his nervous system, even after a month the seizures continued. The vet gave us phenobarbital to control the seizures but that did not always work so after all the effort we ended up having to euthanize our dog because of side effects from Advantix and what is worse he never even had fleas so that stuff was used month after month for nothing. The vet I currently use will not even sell Advantix because of the adverse reactions in many dogs. I asked how the company could keep selling it and he told me that many people do not associate the dog getting sick with the product and it is hard to prove the product made the dog sick so adverse reaction from the product seem relatively low.
      I do not ever use those chemicals on my dogs anymore. I use natural preventative remedies such as giving apple cider vinegar in their water, adding brewers yeast and omega 3 to food, I also use vinegar in a spray bottle as a repellent.
      I would not use any chemicals used to prevent fleas. I would wait until my dog was affected by fleas before treating. So far even without using vet recommended products my dogs have not gotten fleas or ticks.
      Also, Advantix is made up of Imadacloprid & Permathrin so if you are going to use Advantix you might as well save some money and get Bio spot instead.
      Here are some reasons not use Advantix:
      http://www.dogsonly.org/Woof/toast.asp?sub=show&action=posts&fid=2&tid=29&page=7
      http://files.meetup.com/126249/Flea_Tick%20Treatment%20Alert%20Letter.pdf
      http://www.peteducation.com/article.cfm?cls=2&articleid=598

      Just thought I would mention that although washing it off is a good idea, it will not really help because the stuff goes into the blood and that is what causes the damage.

  11. QUESTION:
    How often should I clean my dog's ears?
    My dog has had chronic ear infections for years. When he gets medicine from the vet, it will go away, but then come back. The medicine we are using right now is supposed to be put in his ear once a day. I clean his ear right before I put the medicine in it. Should I also clean it another time or another two times during the day?

    • ANSWER:
      Try this homemade ear cleaner. It has worked better for ear infections in my dogs that anything I ever got from a vet. The ingredients are all available from a pharmacy without a prescription. Mix them in a 8 oz. bottle that had an applicator tip (like a hair coloring bottle from beauty supply). Use it every day when you see your dog scratching their ear or if it smells or has discharge. Squirt some in and massage the ear canal well. When is cleared up, use it weekly for prevention. Try to trim any hair from the opening in the ear to help air get to it.

      6 oz. isopropyl (rubbing) alcohol
      1 ½ teaspoons boric acid powder
      **Mix well until the powder dissolves**
      add 2 oz. white vinegar, then add one teaspoon of Betadine antiseptic
      **shake well now and every time before using**

      Also go read the ingredients panel on your dog food as grain allergies (grains with gluten, similar to celiac disease in a human) might be contributing to yeast overgrowth and ear infections. Most vets were not trained in pet nutrition and will recommend popular foods (or the Science D*** they sell) but not tell you to eliminate grains. Check these sites to understand good dog foods:

      http://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/
      http://www.dogfoodanalysis.com/

  12. QUESTION:
    does any one have the label of kirkland chicken and rice dog food?
    Hear this was a good dog food sold at costco.

    • ANSWER:
      Here ya are.Sounds great to me,I think I might try a bag for my dogs!

      Chicken, chicken meal, whole grain brown rice, cracked pearled barley, chicken fat (preserved with mixed tocopherols and Vitamin E), egg product, beet pulp, potatoes, fish meal, flaxseed, natural flavor, brewers dried yeast, millet, potassium chloride, salt, choline chloride, carrots, peas, kelp, apples, dried skim milk, cranberry powder, rosemary extract, parsley flake, dried chicory root, glucosamine hydrochloride, vitamin E supplement, iron proteinate, zinc proteinate, copper proteinate, ferrous sulfate, zinc sulfate, copper sulfate, potassium iodide, thiamine mononitrate, manganese proteinate, manganous oxide, chondroitin sulfate, ascorbic acid, vitamin A supplement, biotin, calcium pantothenate, manganese sulfate, sodium selenite, pyridoxine hydrochloride (vitamin B6), vitamin B12 supplement, riboflavin, vitamin D supplement, folic acid.

      PLEASE READ THE FOLLOWING IMPORTANT INFORMATION: - Read all ingredients contained directly on or in any product label or packaging carefully before consuming any product offered on this web site. Manufacturers can change ingredients or manufacturing processes without notice or warning, so you must carefully read the ingredients on or in the product label or packaging itself when you receive it. Plumgood Food will not assume liability for any cross contamination of ingredients, misprints, or adverse reactions to any ingredients in the products we carry.

      The products and the claims made about specific products on or through this site have not been evaluated by Plumgood Food or the United States Food and Drug Administration and are not approved to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent disease. The information provided on this site is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional or any information contained on or in any product label or packaging. You should not use the information on this site for diagnosis or treatment of any health problem or for prescription of any medication or other treatment. You should consult with a healthcare professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem.

  13. QUESTION:
    What food can i feed my dwarf hamster?
    I bought a winter white hamster a week ago and it seems bored of the same food i give it. What food can i give it besides dry hamster food?

    • ANSWER:
      Hi,

      There are loads of different foods you could feed him/her.

      (List from http://www.petwebsite.com/hamsters/hamst…

      Vegetables and herbs that are safe to feed a hamster are:

      Alfalfa
      Apple (seedless)
      Asparagus
      Avocado (skinned and seedless)
      Banana
      Basil
      Blackberries
      Blueberries
      Broccoli
      Brussel Sprouts - small amounts occasionally - not all hamsters like the strong taste
      Calabrese
      Cabbage - should only be fed in small amounts occasionally as too much can cause health problems
      Carrots
      Cauliflower leaves and stalks
      Celery
      Cherries - stones should be removed as they can be dangerous if gnawed
      Chestnuts
      Chicory
      Chinese Leaves
      Coriander
      Corn-on-the-Cob
      Corn Salad
      Courgette
      Cranberries
      Cress
      Cucumber
      Curly Kale
      Dates
      Endive
      Fenugreek
      Feijoa
      Figs
      Grapes
      Green beans
      Kale - should only be fed in small amounts occasionally as too much can cause health problems
      Kidney Beans (cooked)
      Kiwi Fruit
      Kumquat
      Lettuce - small amounts occasionally - in excess it can cause liver problems
      Logan Berries
      Lychee
      Mange Tout
      Mango
      Marrow
      Melon
      Mint
      Mung
      Okra
      Pak Choy
      Papaya
      Parsley - a good tonic
      Peach
      Pear
      Peas
      Plums - stones should be removed as can be dangerous when gnawed
      Potato (cooked)
      Raspberries
      Raspberry Plant leaves - beneficial for diarrhoea
      Rhubarb (cooked)
      Rocket Chard
      Sage
      Sorrel
      Squash
      Star Fruit
      Strawberries
      Sugar Cane - small amounts
      Sweet Potato
      Soybean Sprouts
      Swede
      Sweetcorn
      Sweet Peppers
      Ugli Fruit
      Turnip
      Water Chestnuts
      Watermelon
      Water Spinach
      Vegetables and herbs that should not be fed are:

      Kidney Beans (raw)
      Onion
      Potato (raw)
      Potato tops
      Rhubarb (raw)
      Rhubarb leaves
      Tomato leaves

      You can also feed her/him dog biscuits, preferably as treats. Make sure no garlic or onion.

      Other Protein food:

      Cooked Ground Beef-Remove all grease
      Steamed or baked Chicken or Turkey
      Cottage Cheese LF
      Fish Cod without bones and skin
      Meal worms
      Bread-not white! soaked in milk LF, soy
      Scrambled, Boiled Eggs
      Plain LF Yoghurt

      Random foods:

      Baby Food, low sugar, better not sweet.
      Cooked Brown Rice
      Dry toast
      Unsalted Pumpkin Seeds
      Sesame Seeds
      Yeast
      Lentils
      Oatmeal-if soaked in milk, make sure soy or skimmed!

      FOODS TO AVOID:
      Pickles - makes hamster sick, may cause diarrhoea
      Almonds
      Apple Seeds
      Canned food
      Candy & Chocolate
      Junk food
      Anything containing pork
      Potatoes (Raw)
      Raw Kidney Beans
      Eggplant
      Grape Seeds
      Avocado
      Raw Rhubarb
      Tomato leaves
      Citrus fruits - includes oranges
      Apricot Stone
      Jams and jellies
      Spices, includes chives
      Garlic, onions
      Leeks
      Fruit Stones

      Hope I helped!

  14. QUESTION:
    What are the basics to taking care of a German shpherd?
    Supplies needed, tools needed, toys, good food, etc. Oh and of course a good adoption center for GSD near Seattle WA :) please help!

    • ANSWER:
      Prepare for a looonnnggg answer!

      1- Water Bowl - Food Bowl (Usually the water bowl is larger than food bowl - I recommend buying stainless steel bowls as plastic bowls tend to hold more bacteria - Her bowls should be washed after each meal)

      2-Leash and Collar (Your puppy will be so active so she'll need 2 to 3 walks per day - You need to buy the perfect size for your dog's collar - Please don't buy retractable leash to teach your dog to walk next to you , now wander around - Also don't buy chock collars because it's painful for dogs)

      3-Crate (It's great to crate train your puppy at young age - You should buy a wire crate as it will let your dog be more comfortable and can see through)

      4-Bed (Well it doesn't have to be a fancy bed , just something soft and comfy for your little pup - I recommend that you should buy the bed when your puppy is a dog because she may chew on the bed when she is young. You should use a blanket or a pillow for her until she grows.)

      5- Grooming tools (That includes Brushes , Nail clipper , Doggy shampoo , Towels) (You can start bathing your puppy when she is 4 to 5 months , so you'd give a chance for her coat to grow. - Don't bathe her except when she is dirty , or you can bathe her max. once every month.)

      6- Name tag (If your dog gets lost , anyone who will find his ID he'll call your number to give you your dog back)

      7- Quality Puppy Food (There are good brands out there , In my opinion the best dog food is "Blue Buffalo" - You should feed your dog puppy food until she is 1 to 1 and half years old because puppy food contains more nutrition , and when she turns 1 year and 6 months start feeding her adult dog food)

      8- Tooth Brush and Tooth Paste (Many people ignore brushing their dog's teeth since they believe it's not important . Brushing your dog's teeth is highly recommended , it will prevent long term problems (i.e. kidney failure, bad breath, rotting teeth, etc.)

      9- Treats and bones (When your puppy is young she'll need treats to motivate her and make her learn things easier. RAW bones , never give your puppy cooked bones or else it will splinter her stomach. You can start giving her bones at age of 6 months and make sure she chews them , One of my dogs when she was young used to swallow everything including bones !!)

      10-Puppy Training pads - Newspaper

      11- Winter clothing (If you live in a place where it's cold , you'd better buy some heavy clothes for your puppy to keep her warm on walks.

      12- Vet (Choose a well known vet and make sure he/she is good)

      13- Safe dogs' toys (make sure that the toys are not small so your puppy doesn't swallow it. Some knotted ropes , balls , stuffed animals , squeaky toys will do it.)

      14- Things that dogs should NEVER eat (Avocado - Alcohol - Onions and Garlic - Coffee, Tea, and Other Caffeine - Grapes and Raisins - Milk and Other Dairy Products -Macadamia Nuts - Candy and Gum - Chocolate - Fat Trimmings and Bones - Persimmons, Peaches, and Plums - Raw Eggs - Raw Meat and Fish - Salt - Sugary Foods and Drinks - Yeast Dough )

      15- Some fruits that are Safe ( Slices of apples, oranges, bananas, and watermelon make tasty treats for your dog. Be sure to remove any seeds first, though. Seeds, stems, and leaves can cause serious problems.)

      16- Some veggies that are safe ( Your dog can have a healthy snack of carrot sticks, green beans, cucumber slices, or zucchini slices. Even a plain baked potato is OK. Be sure, though, not to let your dog eat any raw potatoes or any potato plants it might have access to in your garden.)

      Exercise

      GSDs need a good walk for an our every day without fail. They need mental stimulation too, like a good dog puzzle toy you can get on amazon. Taking him to agility and flyball exercises will benefit!

      Shelters

      http://dogs.oodle.com/german_shepherd/seattle-area/

      http://www.washingtongsd.org/

      Look for some on the internet too.
      Good Luck with your GSD !!
      p.s I copied some of the list of veggies

  15. QUESTION:
    What is the best thing to give my Samoyed to make his coat thick?
    I took my Samoyed to the vet and they gave him too much grooming. Cut his undercoat. I want his coat to come back thick. What is the best thing to give him. Someone said fish oil, but this seems to make his tummy growl. Someone else said yeast tablets. Any advice you can give me would be appreciated.

    • ANSWER:
      Yes, I am a former breeder and exhibitor of Samoyeds for the show ring. Samoyeds are beautiful dogs when their coats are properly maintained but very pathetic looking when under the care of half hearter owners who ignore their coat needs.

      Samoyeds are double coated dogs that go through annual changes in coat when the spring weather sets in. They were bred for Artic temperatures,;but because they are double coated, they are able to adjust their coat volume to either insulate from the heat or from the cold. They tend to have fuller coats in colder climates but adjust to the climate that they live in very well. Samoyeds in Brazil, for example, will never have the bushy winter coats of the Samoyeds in Michigan, USA.

      At this time of the year, they "blow all the undercoat" in order to adapt for a warmer season and to also begin growing new coat for the cold, winter months. The blown coat is actually dead hair that you can actually pull out in little perfect tufts. If the dog is not groomed, the hair eventually starts to fall out in massive quantities. If he is groomed, the groomer uses a grooming rake to pull out the dead hair before bathing, and the shampoo and warm water do the rest.Groomers will use a blue shampoo, known as a whitening shampoo, to thoroughly remove any dirt and maintain a bright white coat. If maintained regularly, the coat continues to brighten more and more . Once shampooed, a Samoyed requires hours of drying followed by further brushing to remove any remaining dead hair.

      Your dog will start to grow his undercoat in September and begin to return to a thicker coat by November. Once again, in April the coat change will begin again. This is an ongoing process with this breed that is best managed by taking the dog to the same groomer every 4-6 weeks so he can establish a routine with the dog that can actually reduce the time somewhat to finish the grooming.

      The absolute best thing you can do to maintain a lush, healthy coat year round, is to take your dog to a groomer once a month. If you go less often, the extra time required to groom the dog will end out costing you more and the dog will never look as nice as if he had regular grooming. Furthermore, if you try bathing him at home, you will likely not dry him suffiently , which will cause severe mats (tangles) that twist down to the skin and actually cause skin infections.

      You own a marvelous and beautiful breed of dog. He does not need any additives but is likely to become overweight without adequate exercise. For the show ring, I took my dogs for daily 3 mile walks to maintain condition. They are working breeds that need a job and some activity. Without much activity, you are better to cut the quantity of food to nor more that 1 1/2 cups of a maintenance kibble once a day. You should also know that Sammy coats will get a little dull from home heating during the winter and house dust--not because of the need for additions to the diet. The regular grooming will take care of that.

      Hope this helps.

  16. QUESTION:
    How do I introduce a new cat to my current one?
    I have a 13 year old female Persian and I may be adopting a 6 year old Himalayan male Persian. I don't want my girl to get upset that I am bring a new cat into our home. She originally came from a household with a cat and a dog, so I think she'll be okay, but I don't want to do anything to upset her. Any advice would be appreciated.

    • ANSWER:
      If you haven't brought the male into your home yet, when you see him next wipe him or her down with a towel and bring it home with you. Set it very casually on the floor, and let your cat approach it, (don't bring your cat to the towel like you're showing her, let her find it on her own). If you have plenty of time in advance, then leave the towel around for several days, and even bring more towels with the males’ scent. Place them several places in the house, in the same way you “planted” the first one. It may also be helpful to rub your cat down with a towel also and bring it to the male.

      When it’s time for the male to come home for the first time, as you are distracting your resident cat, have a friend, (someone who doesn’t live with you) bring the male in and place him or her in a room with the door closed. Also ask your friend to get the food and water dishes and the litter box set up in the closed room. Include toys and a bed, (or just a box with towels). The litter box should be in the opposite side of the room from the food, water and bed. DO NOT set up the males room before you bring him or her home. This will only confuse your cat. The point is to make your older cat think that the male suddenly, (and magically!) appeared, without your knowledge.

      Your cat will approach the door and pick up on the scent of the male. Don’t get discouraged or worried if you hear some hissing and growling, as this is very common. For the first couple days, spend a limited time in the room with the male and make sure to give your resident cat plenty of affection, even more than usual. Another helpful thing to try is to attach two toys with a string, and leave them on opposite sides of the door, so the cats can play together.

      Cats are very territorial animals, and this is why you don’t want her to see the male as an intruder that YOU brought home and shoved in her face. Cats are very much creatures of habit and routine, so when her routine is disrupted, don’t be surprised if she becomes very angry. You must be the judge of when they should meet face-to-face, but don’t push things too quickly, it may take a few days of sniffing each other under the door before they have settled down. When you believe they have calmed down and are ready, casually open the door a few inches. Remember, you are being nonchalant about this; do not force them on each other. You should pick a time after both cats have just eaten; feed them a treat that you know they will love, (like some of their favorite cooked meat). They will be content and their bellies will be full, so they’re less likely to want to exert a lot of energy in a cat fight. Supervise them and don’t be surprised if the older cat swats at or fights with the male. Don’t step in and separate them unless someone’s getting hurt worse than just a scratch on the nose. The male will probably retreat into his or her room at which time you should close the door. Increase the time you allow them to interact each day. Don’t leave them together unattended until you are confident that they comfortable with each other. Be patient. It may take a few weeks or even a few months, but if all goes well they will soon become the best of friends.

      Extra tip: to ease the initial tension of introduction, rub each cat down with brewer's yeast powder. Brewer's yeast is available in natural food stores. It's all natural, full of vitamin B, and will actually go good for the cats to lick it off. The smell of the brewers yeast helps disguise the foreign odors and each cat will basically smell the same. Don't use anything like baby powder because the talc isn't good for the cat to breathe or ingest. You should use the same grooming tools (combs, brushes, towels, mitts) on both cats to transfer their scents to one another.

      Good luck!

  17. QUESTION:
    Does anyone have good recipes for dog treats that don't need to be refrigerated?
    sites would be helpful also. only dog treats and only recipes that will last at least 2 weeks without needing to be refrigerated please :)

    • ANSWER:
      Favorite Cheesy Dog Biscuits

      1 1/2 cups whole wheat flour
      1 1/4 cups grated cheddar cheese
      1/4 pound margarine -- corn oil
      1 clove garlic -- crushed
      1 pinch salt
      1/4 cup Milk -- or as needed

      Grate the cheese into a bowl and let stand until it reaches room temperature. Cream the cheese with the
      softened margarine, garlic, salt and flour. Add enough milk to form into a ball.
      Chill for 1/2 hour. Roll onto floured board. Cut into shapes and bake at 375 degrees for 15 minutes or until slightly
      brown, and firm. Makes 2 to 3 dozen, depending on size

      Alfalfa Hearts

      2 cups whole wheat flour
      1/2 cup soy flour
      1 teaspoon bone meal -- optional
      2 tablespoons nutritional yeast
      1 tablespoon lecithin -- optional
      1/2 teaspoon salt
      1/4 teaspoon garlic powder
      3 tablespoons alfalfa sprouts -- chopped
      1 cup brown rice -- cooked
      3 tablespoons canola oil
      1/2 cup water
      Combine flours, bone meal, yeast, lecithin, salt, garlic powder and alfalfa leaves. Add rice and oil. Combine well.
      Add 1/4 cup water and mix well. Dough should be very easy to handle, not crumbly. Add more water if needed to
      achieve proper consistency.
      Lightly flour board or counter and roll out dough to 1/4 inch thickness. Cut with 2 1/2 inch cutter. Bake at 350
      degrees for 25 minutes. Makes 3 dozen

      Alfie And Archie's Dog Biscuits

      2 1/2 cups whole wheat flour
      1/2 cup dry milk -- powder
      1/2 teaspoon salt
      1/2 teaspoon garlic powder
      1 teaspoon brown sugar
      6 tablespoons beef fat
      1 egg -- beaten
      1/2 cup ice water
      1. Preheat oven to 350. Lightly oil a cookie sheet. Combine flour, dry milk, salt, garlic powder and sugar. Cut in
      meat drippings until mixture resembles corn meal. Mix in egg. Add enough water so that mixture forms a ball.
      Using your fingers, pat out dough onto cookie sheet to half inch thick. Cut with cookie cutter or knife and remove
      scraps. Scraps can be formed again and baked.
      2. Bake 25-30 minutes. Remove from tray and cool on rack

      An Apple a Day Dog Treat

      Apple Cinnamon Doggie Biscuits
      1 package apple, dried
      1 teaspoon Cinnamon -- (I usually just shake some in)
      1 Tablespoon parsley, freeze-dried
      1 Tablespoon Garlic Powder
      1 cup ice water
      1/2 cup Corn Oil
      5 cups flour
      1/2 cup powdered milk
      2 large eggs
      1 tablespoon corn oil
      Put the apples in a food processor so that pieces are small. Combine in a bowl all of the ingredients -- can add oil
      or water if dough is too dry. Using a rolling pin roll out dough to about 3/16" thick (can make thinner or thicker).
      Using a cookie cutter -- cut into shapes -- place on cookie sheets. Bake at 350 degrees for approx 20 -25 minutes
      (until golden).

      Apple Cinnamon Doggie Biscuits

      1 package apple, dried
      1 teaspoon Cinnamon -- (I usually just shake some in)
      1 Tablespoon parsley, freeze-dried
      1 Tablespoon Garlic Powder
      1 cup ice water
      1/2 cup Corn Oil
      5 cups flour
      1/2 cup powdered milk
      2 large eggs
      1 tablespoon corn oil
      Put the apples in a food processor so that pieces are small. Combine in a bowl all of the ingredients -- can add oil
      or water if dough is too dry. Using a rolling pin roll out dough to about 3/16" thick (can make thinner or thicker).
      Using a cookie cutter -- cut into shapes -- place on cookie sheets. Bake at 350 degrees for approx 20 -25 minutes
      (until golden).

      Apple Crunch Pupcakes

      2 3/4 cups water
      1/4 cup unsweetened applesauce
      2 tablespoons honey
      1 medium egg
      1/8 teaspoon vanilla extract
      4 cups whole wheat flour
      1 cup apple, dried
      1 tablespoon baking powder
      Preheat oven to 350 degrees. In a small bowl, mix together water, applesauce, honey, egg, and vanilla. In a large
      bowl, combine flour, apple chips, and baking powder. Add liquid ingredients to dry ingredients and mix until very
      well blended. Pour into greased muffin pans, Bake 1 1/4 hours, or until a toothpick inserted in the center comes
      out dry. Store in a sealed container.
      Makes 12 to 14 pupcakes

      Bacon Bites

      3 cups whole wheat flour
      1/2 cup milk
      1 egg
      1/4 cup bacon grease -- or vegetable oil
      1 teaspoon garlic powder
      4 slices bacon -- crumbled
      1/2 cup cold water
      Mix ingredients together thoroughly. Roll out on a floured surface to 1/2 - 1/4" thickness.
      Bake for 35-40 minutes in a 325 degree oven

      BARF Breakfast (med size dog
      1/4 cup rolled oats
      1/2 cup yogurt
      1/4 cup vegetables -- *see Note
      250 mgs vitamin C -- for dogs. Crushed
      1 teaspoon honey
      1 teaspoon apple cider vinegar
      1 teaspoon kelp seaweed powder -- *see Note
      1 teaspoon alfalfa powder -- *see Note
      1 digestive enzyme -- for dogs Optional
      1 teaspoon flax seed oil -- *see Note
      1/4 cup kibble -- optional
      Soak rolled oats in yogurt overnight. Mix all ingredients and serve. Add kibble if desired.
      Note: shredded, lightly steamed or pureed. carrots, celery, spinach, yams and/or
      broccoli, apples etc.
      Note: items can be purchased at health food store or pet store

      Barking Barley Brownies

      1 1/4 pounds beef liver -- or chicken liver
      2 cups wheat germ
      2 tablespoons whole wheat flour
      1 cup cooked barley
      2 whole eggs
      3 tablespoons peanut butter
      1 clove garlic
      1 tablespoon olive oil
      1 teaspoon salt -- optional
      Pre heat oven to 350.
      Liquefy liver and garlic clove in a blender, when its smooth add eggs and peanut butter. Blend till smooth.
      In separate mixing bowl combine wheat germ, whole wheat flour, and cooked Barley. Add processed liver
      mixture, olive oil and salt. Mix well. spread mixture in a greased 9x9 baking dish. Bake for 20 minutes or till done.
      When cool cut into pieces that accommodate your doggies size.
      Store in refrigerator or freezer

  18. QUESTION:
    How do I get rid of the Yeast on my dog?
    My dog has yeast on her paw, and her chin. I been going to the Vet for months now, and the meds they prescribe doesn't help much and they are very expensive. Is there a natural, and cheaper method towards destroying yeast once and for all, without going to a Vet?

    • ANSWER:
      apple cider vinegar and yogurt! mix it with her food
      you can also spray apple cider vinegar and water (mix half and half) directly on the affected spots
      good luck!

  19. QUESTION:
    Why do I get a painful rash on my legs when I go for an extra long walk?
    I haven't walked my dog for a while now because whenever I do, I come home with a rash on my legs that itches like no other and is hot to the touch compared to other parts of my body. (My dog is getting walked by my parents for now, so he is getting his exercise.)

    What do you think it is?

    • ANSWER:
      Hi,

      Sounds like your malady may be a bacteria_fungus i.e. ringworm and/or yeast infection AND/OR an allergic reaction to something that is toxic to your liver/kidneys but it's hard to tell without seeing and learning the details about what you have been eating breathing and applying to your skin. SEE https://health.google.com/health/ref/Ringworm Monistat 7 will likely kill any fungus in a few days and better micro-nutrition will keep it killed and will also strengthen your liver lymph and kidney systems to handle allergic reactions with less suffering in the future.

      IF you think it may be an allergic reaction - although it may be a difficult process - try to identify your triggers from cosmetics meds nuts milk grains other-foods chlorine-water-in-showers etcetera by discontinuing them until the symptoms stop and then beginning them again to see how your body reacts. If you are like me you may start to see allergies to many things because the root problem for me was a severely weakened liver from too many nutritional supplements that were toxic and I never knew it until it was almost too late.

      After several months of pruritus Urticaria that began during the colder months of November inside a gas heated low humidity home, I have identified enough of my own triggers to allow my legs to heal with only a super-minimal amount of coconut cream and water rubbed on my skin and a minimal number of full body showers.

      After several applications my lymph glands have become severely allergic to petrolatum products that are similar to Vaseline Petroleum Jelly, and common sense has now taught me that any petroleum products should always become toxic to anyone’s kidney and liver with repeated applications. I had flare-ups immediately after I had applied organic olive oil so I eventually changed to minimal amounts of coconut oil after I had used a minimal amount of a petrolatum steroid for a few days to allow my legs to heal up. I also have flareups when I eat over 150 calories of nuts and/or milk fats and/or oils, but these usually flare up about three hours after eating them, but the olive oil always took about five to thirty minutes to begin itching.

      Skin diseases can always return again and again and again and can get much much worse over time if they are not resolved. Soo after reading your description I would strongly encourage you to seek out a 'good' doctor or a ‘good’ nurse and s/he will make a knowledgeable medical diagnosis and thoroughly explain the causes preventions and solutions much better than anyone on Yahoo_Answers could do without being able to see you personally.

      Also, to know how difficult or easy it should be for a doctor to make a ‘good’ diagnosis - I encourage you to also become a ‘good’ medical diagnostician from your doctor’s advice and your own research through Yahoo_Answers and via browser searches.

      FOR HELP WITH PICTURES & INFO SEE:
      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yeast_infection
      http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/skin-rash/SN00016
      http://dermatology.about.com/cs/dermphotos/a/dermgallery.htm
      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dermatosis_of_pregnancy
      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gestational_diabetes
      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Skin_disease

      ITCHINGS & RASHES/BLISTERS CAN BE CAUSED BY EITHER:

      * an allergic reaction to ‘toxins’ in one’s food or skin applications or meds or air (i.e. molds or smoke or vapors) etc.

      * fungal bacterial = thrush yeast_infection jock_itch ringworm etc.

      * viral = measles smallpox etc.

      * parasitical = scabies_mite lice etc.

      * inadequate micro-nutrition absorption in the gut = pellagra scurvy beriberi rickets etc.
      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pellagra

      * either sun or hormonal or stress related or a combination of the above that make it difficult to find a definite cause
      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/formication

      I truly hope what you learn will help you to decide on the correct choices that will remedy your painful experience of pruritus-itching and rashes in the future.

      My best to you and yours,

      AI – a self taught nutritionIsT >[(-:]

      PS - IF you are interested, I feel I have become a quasi-expert on rashes and pruritus itching after many years of off and on flare ups due to my own nutritionally related asthma and gallbladder disease that ‘continued’ to become heart disease and T2 diabetes and then non-alcoholic fatty liver disease with either PBC or PSC. So you are not alone. Many many people suffer from pruritus and I have learned very late in my own disease(s) that when it is nutritionally related most doctors do not tell their patients that inadequate micro-nutrition absorption in the gut and liver ‘might’ be the root cause and the best solution, and is also the most likely cause to the pruritus and liver diseases that are currently overwhelming our American culture. So to do my part to make a difference in the world I now take a little time each week to help others understand why better micro-nutrition absorption in the gut is so important, and I have posted much of my own story via the link at: http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20091025223942AAni6lC . I hope you will have learned something today from my own mistakes and would not duplicate them – please pass on what you will learn from your own malady to your family friends neighbors and acquaintances. My best to you and yours. AI - nutritionIsT >[(-:]

  20. QUESTION:
    Why does my dog keep scratching and licking his paws?
    My dog is always scratching,they first thing we thought is that he had flees so we gave him treatment however he kept scratching behind his ears quite hard.He also rolls around on the floor so he can rub his back against the floor.He does this all day and I really want him to stop his ears have started bleeding before as he has scratched them so hard inside(not lots of bleeding but you could see a bit of blood).He also keeps licking his paws .

    Do you know what is wrong with him?

    • ANSWER:
      These are the basic signs that point to some kind of allergy, either environmental or food.
      A dog can eat the same food for many years, yet all of a sudden develop an allergy to something in it. Check the food label and make sure there is NO corn, wheat,soy,by-products or chicken.
      These are the most common food allergens. Usually when the ears are affected, it's yeast or ear mites, and either problem needs to be corrected with medication, so you really should let your vet examine the ears.
      In the meantime, one of my shelties just got over this, my vet suggested a 10mg Clariten (I use the generic) daily which did a great deal to help with the itching. I've been told you can use this year round without worrying about side effects, but this is something you have to discuss with your vet.

  21. QUESTION:
    whats the best way to get rid of fleas in your home and from your pets?
    I used to have a dog and currently have a cat. I have been fighting fleas for months now. When I got rid of the dog, I kept shampooing the carpets and using flea powder, etc. and it got rid of them for a couple months or more and then they suddenly came back. I dont know what to do. I have tried everything I know of. Someone told me to use 20 team mule borax.

    • ANSWER:
      Feline Flea Proofing
      Add to the food for each adult cat:
      1/2 level teaspoon brewer's yeast
      1/4 level teaspoon garlic powder

      Flea Destroyer
      Set up a plate of sudsy water with a light hovering over it. The fleas are attracted to this and drown themselves.

      Flea Repellent (for cats)
      1/8 teaspoon tamari soy sauce
      1 crushed whole clove
      1/8 teaspoon water
      1 fresh garlic clove
      Marinate the garlic in the liquid for about 10 minutes and then remove it.
      Add 1/16 teaspoon soy liquid to each 1/2 cup cat food. Use this repellent immediately.

      Flea Repellent Pillows
      These pillows are for dogs.
      Source: Glen Brook Farms Herbs and Such
      2 parts pennyroyal
      1 part thyme
      1 part wormwood
      Herbs may be cut or whole; construct a pillow for your pet to sleep on and then stuff it with the pennyroyal, thyme, wormwood. This makes a nice gift for those favorite dogs in your life. These herbs help to repel fleas naturally and without harsh chemicals.

      Flea Repellent Sleep Pillows
      For cats
      2 parts sage or rosemary
      1 part catnip
      1 part chamomile
      For dogs
      2 parts pennyroyal
      1 part thyme
      1 part wormwood
      Herbs may be used cut or whole. Mix enough to stuff a 2-foot square pillow for a cat or a 3-foot square (or larger) pillow for a dog. Sew the pillowcase out of a tough, washable fabric such as denim.

      Herbal Flea Powder
      Use herbs in powdered form only.
      2 ounces pennyroyal (use sage or rosemary for cats)
      1 ounce rosemary
      1 ounce wormwood
      1 teaspoon cayenne pepper
      Mix and store in a covered container. Use as often as any flea powder and rub into skin.
      DO NOT LET POWDER GET INTO PET'S EYES.

      Herbal Flea Powder
      1 part eucalyptus powder
      1 part pennyroyal powder (use sage or rosemary for cats)
      1 part fennel powder
      1 part yellow dock powder
      Combine all ingredients in a shaker top jar and shake to mix.
      Apply to your pet's fur by brushing backward with your hand or comb and sprinkling the powder into the roots of the hairs. Concentrate on the neck, back, and belly. Use just enough to add a little odor to the hairs.
      For severe flea infestations, treat daily; otherwise, use two or three times a week.

      http://www.recipegoldmine.com/pets/pets.html

  22. QUESTION:
    Does anyone have any personal experience with fatigue caused by yeast-candida?
    I am hoping to learn more about the possibility of fatigue caused by the over growth of yeast or "Candida". I have been doing a lot of research on the internet, but have found so many different opinions on how to treat it, what the diet should look like and different symptoms that it may cause. A lot of it doesn't seem to match up. I am looking to find the best sites to look for real information, possible facts, studies and personal success stories. Thank you.

    • ANSWER:
      Gidday mate, please please please buy the book "What Your Doctor May Not Tell You About IBS" ~

      http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0446690910/healingchoice-20

      Chapter 6 details precisely how to eliminate the yeast overgrowth known as candida albicans ........... i personally eliminated a vast array of symptoms including fatigue and exhaustion, constipation, bloating, headaches and migraines, moodiness and irritability, achy bones, cramping, nausea, thrush, fingernail fungus all by simply eliminating the source of food for the yeast ie ~ yeast and processed sugar.

      The classic telltale signs of a yeast overgrowth ....... candidiasis ...... are those of a white tongue (thrush), toenail or fingernail fungus, jock itch or athlete's foot, and vaginal yeast infections........... an overgrowth of yeast can affect virtually every system of the body with the gastrointestinal, genitourinary, endocrine, nervous and immune systems being the most susceptible.... common symptoms of candidiasis include:

      Digestive disorders, including IBS;
      Gastrointestinal symptoms: thrush, bloating gas, rectal itching;
      Vaginal yeast infections;
      Urinary tract infections;
      Athlete's foot or jock itch;
      Fungal toenails or fingernails;
      Cravings for sugar, bread, or alcohol;
      Diaper rash;
      Fatigue;
      Irritability (especially when hungry);
      Premenstrual syndrome and menstrual problems;
      Fibromyalgia;
      headaches;
      Brain fog;
      Skin problems or itching;
      Numbness or tingling in the extremities;
      Respiratory problems;
      Depression;
      Hypoglycemia;
      Short attention span;
      Loss of libido.

      Candidiasis almost never occurs in people with healthy immune systems who eat a diet low in sugar and yeast....you need to avoid all yeast and sugar products to kill a yeast infection ......... sugar will literally feed the yeast overgrowth allowing it to flourish......... ditch the alcohol and sodas and diet sodas too if you drink any .......... antiobiotics, especially broad - spectrum antiobiotics will also kill the helpful bacteria which you need for a healthy gut ........ supplement with a good quality probiotic to rebalance gut flora ......... this part is absolutely essential for without the good flora your system will remain completely out of whack ...... eat more alkaline forming foods such as leafy and green vegies, fishes such as tuna, salmon, sardines and whiting, organic nuts and seeds such as almonds and brazil nuts........ all these foods are rich in magnesium and will thus encourage the production of hydrochloric acid in your tummy aiding in digestion and effective elimination ........the leafy greens and fishes are also rich in calcium and protein and the fish are a rich source of vitamin D too ....... eat organic brown rice and quinoa (prounounced keen ~ wah) as they are both a rich source of the B complex of vitamins and will provide you with the carbs you need for sustained energy and the quinoa is also rich in calcium and iron .......... don't forget about getting enough iron on a daily basis too ie ~ lean red meats ..... Avoid sugars such as honey, molasses, fructose, maltose, lactose (that means all milk and dairy products) and fruit juices ...... avoid artificial sweetners and foods containing brewer's yeast - ie - alcohol such as beer, wine, brandy, whiskey, rum, ciders and root beer.... avoid baker's yeast ie ~ breads and rolls and pastries .... avoid mushrooms ... avoid fruits and vegies with any sign of mold growth on them .... avoid fermented beverages and condiments including mayonnaise, ketchup, pickled vegies and pickles, salad dressings (use lemon and olive oil instead), soy sauce and vinegar .... avoid all types of hard cheeses which are a pretty good source of mold.... avoid processed and smoked meats and fish, including hot dogs, sausages, luncheon meats etc....... these meats are processed with sugar, spices, yeast and other preservatives .... avoid canned bottled or frozen fruit and vegie juices cos they have loads of sugar and are commonly made from overripened or damaged produce; generally the skin of the fruit contains surface mold and rotten spots, which are pulverised into the juice... avoid dried fruits.... avoid coffee & tea as much as you can as caffeine will aggravate yeast overgrowth..................... you don't need to use medications to kill a yeast overgrowth ..... simply eliminate their food source and they will disappear on their own ...... if you normalise the bacterial flora in the gastrointestinal tract you will feel much better and in most cases won't need drugs ♥

      truly, eat loads and loads of green and leafy vegies, squeeze lemon juice over it to spice it up and help torch bacteria and bolster both your immunity and digestive process ........eat some low sugar fruits each day too such as strawberries, pears and watermelon and cold water fresh fishes and brown rice / quinoa and watch it clear up........ oh, drink loads and loads of fresh filtered water to ... to ensure you are properly hydrated as the healthiest and happiest body will always be the most hydrated one .

      make sure that you only eat organic nuts and seeds like almonds, brazil nuts and sunflower seeds too as they "preserve" the commercial varieties with sulfites and other nasty chemicals that will upset sensitive digestive systems.

      hope you feel better soon

      peace 2 you

  23. QUESTION:
    What are some fun, easy, and cheap christmas traditions?
    I want to celebrate christmas with my family, but with us, holidays are just another day. I need decorations, fun things to do as a family...What do you do for Christmas?

    15 and 19 year old teens, 53 and 67 year old parents, 2 year old dog.

    • ANSWER:
      WOW! What a fun time of year. Some of our family traditions include a well rounded agenda for religion, nationality, baking and decorating cookies, and making a family letter and write a paragraph about each person and what they have done this past year to go in with Christmas cards sent to family & friends.
      On Christmas eve we make a meal of unleavened bread (no yeast or ingredient to make the bread dough rise) which comes in packages at the store (with the flour and other bread maker packages) and you just add any liquid ingredients, 2 or 3 different fresh fish (mild in taste and smell, ask the person behind the butcher counter for his recommendations) baked with or without seasoning and herbs. Even getting boxes of frozen fish sticks works. Buy fish dips like tartar sauce, shrimp sauce, etc. and olive oil to break the bread apart by hand and dip it in saucer size plates of the olive oil. This was the meal Jesus provided for all those who came to the sermon on the mount. We buy bottles of non alcoholic wine but, that is our choice of drink. Other ideas for or with family is bake a pan of doggie biscuits, buy and play board games, card games, some board games now come on DVD, make tree decorations out of light weight foods like popcorn, fruit loops, etc and string them in a pattern using yarn, fish line or thread. Look on line for a recipe for Wassail (an apple cider base hot drink with seasonings). HAVE FUN AND MERRY CHRISTMAS. oh one last idea for each person or just you to make small decorative notes of your gift to Jesus (as it is his birthday we are celebrating) and clip or hang them on the tree with any type of hanger or clip.

  24. QUESTION:
    How do I become a successful vegetarian without the soy?
    I've heard that soy's not healthy but I also need some clarification on that, because they said (a doctor on YouTube) that fermented organic soy is good. But isn't that soy already? And he mentioned that miso, tempeh, and nato to try. But I did some research and found out that those are soy also. Finally, What are some good, and healthy, ways to get my full daily protein?

    • ANSWER:
      My son, who is the healthiest vegan I know, has researched a lot about soy. The problem is the way the product is processed. Heating can kill a lot of the nutrients, so he only uses fermented soy products that have been produced the same way for hundreds of years. That would include miso and tempeh, but not overly processed foods like soy hot dogs and other deli products. He tries to eat foods that only contain a few ingredients.

      You can get protein from nuts, which should be soaked before using, as it makes them more digestible. We make a cheese from blending soaked cashews with a jar of pimentos, some nutritional yeast, lemon juice, and garlic. You can add smoky paprika, too, for a wonderful cheesy flavor. I recently bought a dehydrator so that I can prepare nuts very simply by pre-soaking, then dehydrating. They are still considered a raw product, and are more digestible. Lentils and beans also contribute protein.

  25. QUESTION:
    my dog has really dry bad skin, its a yeast infection or the mange or something, how do i get rid of it?
    we was taking her to the vet but the bill got a lil high for my income. my mom and sister keep trying these made up home remedies, like washing her with tresemme giving her benedryl. bt she isnt getting better, she's getting worse. And it doesnt make it better that they feed her table food all the time, yes she is a mixed breed dog, bt her skin is so sensative i dnt think she should be eating everything and doing all these human things. i need alot of help, they wont listen to me.

    • ANSWER:
      She needs to see a vet. Home remedies don't work in cases where you don't even know what the problem is, and shouldn't be done without a vet's guidance anyway.

  26. QUESTION:
    what natural snacks can I give my puppy?
    I just got an 8 week old bordercollie/husky/shepard/chow mix puppy, and read up on foods that aren't good for dogs. Including meat fat, raw egg, dairy products, and certain fruits n vegetables. Are there any natural or people food snacks I can give my puppy without problems? Or at least when she's grown?

    • ANSWER:
      Here are some more no-no's for you:

      Alcoholic beverages Can cause intoxication, coma, and death.

      Baby food Can contain onion powder, which can be toxic to dogs. (Please see onion below.) Can also result in nutritional deficiencies, if fed in large amounts.

      Bones from fish, poultry, or other meat sources Can cause obstruction or laceration of the digestive system.

      Cat food Generally too high in protein and fats.

      Chocolate, coffee, tea, and other caffeine Contain caffeine, theobromine, or theophylline, which can be toxic and affect the heart and nervous systems.

      Citrus oil extracts Can cause vomiting.

      Fat trimmings Can cause pancreatitis.

      Grapes and raisins Contain an unknown toxin, which can damage the kidneys. There have been no problems associated with grape seed extract.

      Hops Unknown compound causes panting, increased heart rate, elevated temperature, seizures, and death.

      Human vitamin supplements containing iron Can damage the lining of the digestive system and be toxic to the other organs including the liver and kidneys.

      Large amounts of liver Can cause Vitamin A toxicity, which affects muscles and bones.

      Macadamia nuts Contain an unknown toxin, which can affect the digestive and nervous systems and muscle.

      Marijuana Can depress the nervous system, cause vomiting, and changes in the heart rate.

      Milk and other dairy products Some adult dogs and cats do not have sufficient amounts of the enzyme lactase, which breaks down the lactose in milk. This can result in diarrhea. Lactose-free milk products are available for pets.

      Moldy or spoiled food, garbage Can contain multiple toxins causing vomiting and diarrhea and can also affect other organs.

      Mushrooms Can contain toxins, which may affect multiple systems in the body, cause shock, and result in death.

      Onions and garlic (raw, cooked, or powder) Contain sulfoxides and disulfides, which can damage red blood cells and cause anemia. Cats are more susceptible than dogs. Garlic is less toxic than onions.

      Persimmons Seeds can cause intestinal obstruction and enteritis.
      Pits from peaches and plums Can cause obstruction of the digestive tract.

      Potato, rhubarb, and tomato leaves; potato and tomato stems Contain oxalates, which can affect the digestive, nervous, and urinary systems. This is more of a problem in livestock.

      Raw eggs Contain an enzyme called avidin, which decreases the absorption of biotin (a B vitamin). This can lead to skin and hair coat problems. Raw eggs may also contain Salmonella.

      Raw fish Can result in a thiamine (a B vitamin) deficiency leading to loss of appetite, seizures, and in severe cases, death. More common if raw fish is fed regularly.

      Salt If eaten in large quantities it may lead to electrolyte imbalances.
      String Can become trapped in the digestive system; called a "string foreign body."

      Sugary foods Can lead to obesity, dental problems, and possibly diabetes mellitus.

      Table scraps (in large amounts) Table scraps are not nutritionally balanced. They should never be more than 10% of the diet. Fat should be trimmed from meat; bones should not be fed.

      Tobacco Contains nicotine, which affects the digestive and nervous systems. Can result in rapid heart beat, collapse, coma, and death.

      Yeast dough Can expand and produce gas in the digestive system, causing pain and possible rupture of the stomach or intestines.

  27. QUESTION:
    has anyone had theyre dog tested for food allergies-and did you get good results?
    my dog scratches his ears and gets yeast infections in them frequently,i changed his food many times with no luck,,,
    horrorwriter8-yes he has had patches on his skin too, vet says its staph infection from the allergy,,,,he was sure it was from meat protien so he told me to try vegetarian food, with no luck.
    toad- www.quantumalliance.com doesnt work-is the spelling right?

    • ANSWER:
      You can try an elimination diet for dogs. You get rid of everything including treats and you may even have to find another alternative to heartworm preventatives and flea/tick drops. Your dog should not have rawhide or anything else containing food products throughout the duration of the diet.

      You make home cooked meals using only the novel protein and novel carbohydrate and see if that works on getting rid of the itchiness. You can talk to your vet about using a plain, human vitamin instead of flavored dog one or just work without that while using the diet.

      You add in foods one by one to see what causes a reaction. The problem with commercial allergy diets is that they can contain different things to make them easier to produce into kibble that may be causing a reaction. They can give you a false positive.

      Some dogs will have ear problems just because of the structure of their ears. I use Zymox (online for about ) and it clears up periodic problems easily and painlessly.

  28. QUESTION:
    Is it OK for a dog to drink stream water?
    We certainly wouldn't do it.... too many germs, we'd have to boil it or chlorinate it first. Why would or wouldn't it be good for a dog?

    Sometimes I take my dog on a walk and we forget to bring water and he ends up drinking out of a stream. right now in summer the water is not flowing that fast and the water is shallow but he likes to run through it and lap it up

    • ANSWER:
      Actually this is very complicated, since you put in some points associated with immunology and bacteriology (my background) and I do have some time to respond. There is a problem with reductionism here.

      First, humans more than other animals tend to be immune compromised in the western world. When people travel to other countries, they may become ill from the water or from consuming what normally serves as cultural 'street food' (like their equivalent of hot dog stands) for the natives. Some travelers are not affected like this when they travel and tend to be rather robust in health.

      There are different reasons for this. Many people in westernized countries eat 'well' but the nutritional content of their food is diminished. (see McCully source below)

      It is now quite common for people of westernized countries to have irritable bowel, and various other gastro-intestinal problems. Very few regularly consume probiotics in a natural form. Probiotics used to be very important because if one couldn't refrigerate food, it would be preserved by drying (which isn't sterile) or by lactofermentation (lactic acid producing bacteria compete with opportunistic or pathological varieties of micro-organisms and preserve the foods).

      In countries where cultural foods are still common, lactic acid ferment foods, such as fish sauce, kim chee, yogurts (not the pasturized processed kind), and other natural ferments are consumed every day. In some of these countries, the water may be less than optimal, yet they do not get sick because their normal flora tends to be robust.

      Why this is all relevant. ...

      The dog does not spend a lot of time eating clean things from jars and packages, and going ew ewwey ewwwww when told that their kefir is filled with bacteria and living colonies of beneficial yeast. :) They normally do not consume food that has been immediately cooked and prepared - the stuff in the kibble bags is not sterile (although it is far from ideal - see McCully reference). Their normal flora tends to be stronger and more vigorous, as they are usually consuming dirt when cleaning themselves and can often bury something that is raw and consume it days later without harm. (the microbiology of cooked food and raw food is different - cooked food spoils faster because it is more damaged and doesn't support LAB as well)

      Anyway, that is where the difference is primarily between the human health as it is now, and how our dogs are. And we can't really explain that difference by saying there are more germs or whatever.

      Now as to the particulars of a stream, not all steams are equal. Some may have a large amount of contamination of some type, from chemical to protozoal, or other such -- particularly if the chosen spot is relatively stagnant and a long way from its source. So knowing a bit about the stream itself can help guide decision making. A larger, faster moving stream with a lot of varied flora along the banks will tend to aerate better and may be healthier to imbibe than a very thin, slow moving one with sparse vegetation or limited diversity around it.

      I have several kinds of critters and also familiar with the lifestyles and dogs of livestock producers. I've traveled to different places around the world (not born American). Generally the farming types don't get the same amount of trouble with pesky allergies and other immune compromise as do the urban types who regularly wisk down their floors with disinfectants and normally eat canned foods and sterile stuff with extended shelf life. As well, our 'farm' dogs do regularly consume various type of animal scat - from goats, horses, poultry, consume bugs and some rodents with some regularity. :p

      ...ask a simple question :)

  29. QUESTION:
    Should I get a male or female kitten/younger cat as a second cat?
    I have a 2 year old neutered male cat at home. He grew up with 3 other animals (cats/dogs) so I know he is ok with other animals. I was not sure which would be better to bring into the house. A male kitten or a female kitten. Both of the kittens/younger cats would be fixed. I also have a large house with 3 bedrooms and plenty of room for each to have their own space.

    • ANSWER:
      With a proper introduction, either gender would be fine, but I would suggest a female (spayed, and at least twelve weeks old).

      If you haven't brought the kitten into your home yet, when you see him next wipe him or her down with a towel and bring it home with you. Set it very casually on the floor, and let your cat approach it, (don't bring your cat to the towel like you're showing him, let him find it on his own). If you have plenty of time in advance, then leave the towel around for several days, and even bring more towels with the kittens’ scent. Place them several places in the house, in the same way you “planted” the first one. It may also be helpful to rub your cat down with a towel also and bring it to the kitten.

      When it’s time for the kitten to come home for the first time, as you are distracting your resident cat, have a friend, (someone who doesn’t live with you) bring the kitten in and place him or her in a room with the door closed. Also ask your friend to get the food and water dishes and the litter box set up in the closed room. Include toys and a bed, (or just a box with towels). The litter box should be in the opposite side of the room from the food, water and bed. DO NOT set up the kitten’s room before you bring him or her home. This will only confuse your cat. The point is to make your older cat think that the kitten suddenly (and magically!) appeared, without your knowledge.

      Your cat will approach the door and pick up on the scent of the kitten. Don’t get discouraged or worried if you hear some hissing and growling, as this is very common. For the first couple days, spend a limited time in the room with the kitten and make sure to give your resident cat plenty of affection, even more than usual. Another helpful thing to try is to attach two toys with a string, and leave them on opposite sides of the door, so the cats can play together.

      Cats are very territorial animals, and this is why you don’t want him to see the kitten as an intruder that YOU brought home and shoved in his face. Cats are very much creatures of habit and routine, so when his routine is disrupted, don’t be surprised if he becomes very angry. You must be the judge of when they should meet face-to-face, but don’t push things too quickly, it may take a few days of sniffing each other under the door before they have settled down. When you believe they have calmed down and are ready, casually open the door a few inches. Remember, you are being nonchalant about this; do not force them on each other. You should pick a time after both cats have just eaten; feed them a treat that you know they will love, (like some of their favorite cooked meat). They will be content and their bellies will be full, so they’re less likely to want to exert a lot of energy in a cat fight. Supervise them and don’t be surprised if the older cat swats at or fights with the kitten. Don’t step in and separate them unless someone’s getting hurt worse than just a scratch on the nose. The kitten will probably retreat into his or her room at which time you should close the door. Increase the time you allow them to interact each day. Don’t leave them together unattended until you are confident that they comfortable with each other. Be patient. It may take a few weeks or even a few months, but if all goes well they will soon become the best of friends.

      Extra tip: to ease the initial tension of introduction, rub each cat down with brewer's yeast powder. Brewer's yeast is available in natural food stores. It's all natural, full of vitamin B, and will actually go good for the cats to lick it off. The smell of the brewer’s yeast helps disguise the foreign odors and each cat will basically smell the same. Don't use anything like baby powder because the talc isn't good for the cat to breathe or ingest. You should use the same grooming tools (combs, brushes, towels, mitts) on both cats to transfer their scents to one another.

      I hope that helps. Good luck!

  30. QUESTION:
    what did ppl do to control anxiety before medications came out?
    i never used to believe in anxiety until i recently experienced it. randomly, for no specific reason. i actually work at a pharmaceutical company, but i'm a firm believer that anxiety can be managed without medications. any ideas?

    • ANSWER:
      My mom had a very high anxiety level..But then again, she was literally married to the devil!!!!!!!!!!! My brother shot and killed him in self-defense when he was 17 in front of me when I was 10. The evil sob died, went to hell, and took over!!!!!!!!!!! She smoked 4 packs of cigarettes a day, but never took a drink in her life. But, with each pregnancy, she stopped smoking. Unfortunately, she died when I was 13. She had a fear of driving and even though before she stopped driving, she only ran upon a hill..it scared her so bad-she never drove again.

      My son and I never suffered from panic attacks until we lost our family dog-Simba was our ONLY family. My heart races so fast that I will almost turn blue when I go into an attack. BUT, we are also allergic to milk, wheat, corn, yeast, rice, and potatoes. If we eat them, we get flushed, hot-inside and out, heart races, etc...I honestly believe many people who think they have anxiety attacks, are allergic to more likely food-but, could be anything.

      Instead of finding out why, people self-medicate and that won't help, it will make it worse.

      ♥♥♥♥♥♥R.I.P. MOM & SIMBA♥♥♥♥♥♥

  31. QUESTION:
    How do you get rid of a flea infestation?
    We currently have a newborn in the house and we noticed the fleas are biting him a lot and would like to know the most safe way to get rid of them!
    We no longer have any pets, for about 2-3 weeks now.

    • ANSWER:
      Treat pets, home, and yard.....

      Feline Flea Proofing
      Add to the food for each adult cat:
      1/2 level teaspoon brewer's yeast
      1/4 level teaspoon garlic powder

      Flea Destroyer
      Set up a plate of sudsy water with a light hovering over it. The fleas are attracted to this and drown themselves.

      Flea Repellent (for cats)
      1/8 teaspoon tamari soy sauce
      1 crushed whole clove
      1/8 teaspoon water
      1 fresh garlic clove
      Marinate the garlic in the liquid for about 10 minutes and then remove it.
      Add 1/16 teaspoon soy liquid to each 1/2 cup cat food. Use this repellent immediately.

      Flea Repellent Pillows
      These pillows are for dogs.
      Source: Glen Brook Farms Herbs and Such
      2 parts pennyroyal
      1 part thyme
      1 part wormwood
      Herbs may be cut or whole; construct a pillow for your pet to sleep on and then stuff it with the pennyroyal, thyme, wormwood. This makes a nice gift for those favorite dogs in your life. These herbs help to repel fleas naturally and without harsh chemicals.

      Flea Repellent Sleep Pillows
      For cats
      2 parts sage or rosemary
      1 part catnip
      1 part chamomile
      For dogs
      2 parts pennyroyal
      1 part thyme
      1 part wormwood
      Herbs may be used cut or whole. Mix enough to stuff a 2-foot square pillow for a cat or a 3-foot square (or larger) pillow for a dog. Sew the pillowcase out of a tough, washable fabric such as denim.

      Herbal Flea Powder
      Use herbs in powdered form only.
      2 ounces pennyroyal (use sage or rosemary for cats)
      1 ounce rosemary
      1 ounce wormwood
      1 teaspoon cayenne pepper
      Mix and store in a covered container. Use as often as any flea powder and rub into skin.
      DO NOT LET POWDER GET INTO PET'S EYES.

      Herbal Flea Powder
      1 part eucalyptus powder
      1 part pennyroyal powder (use sage or rosemary for cats)
      1 part fennel powder
      1 part yellow dock powder
      Combine all ingredients in a shaker top jar and shake to mix.
      Apply to your pet's fur by brushing backward with your hand or comb and sprinkling the powder into the roots of the hairs. Concentrate on the neck, back, and belly. Use just enough to add a little odor to the hairs.
      For severe flea infestations, treat daily; otherwise, use two or three times a week.

      http://www.recipegoldmine.com/pets/pets.html

  32. QUESTION:
    Dog foods with no (or little) added salt?
    Hi,

    I have a dog with heart disease, and he needs a diet with low salt. I still want him to have a high protien (meat based) diet, so I don't want to go for any senior dog food, and I don't want to buy a food that requires a perscription. Most commercial dog foods (even the good ones) have high salt content.

    Are there any high quality dog foods with little to no added salt?

    • ANSWER:
      "Low salt"- less than 250mg sodium per 100gDM (dry matter)
      http://www.blackness2000.fsnet.co.uk/LoNa.htm
      Complete "prescription" low salt diets are available (I think you can buy these without an actual 'prescription' - try online):
      DOGS
      · Pedigree Cardiac Control (tinned and dry)
      · Hills h/d (tinned and dry)
      There's also Azmira, which says "Azmira Lifestyle Dog Formula contains wholesome beef or lamb meal with no fillers or by-products. Provides superior nutrition, herbs and antioxidants. A source of fatty acids, nutritional fiber and natural flavors without salt, sugar or yeast. Naturally preserved, barrier packaged. Fortified with essential vitamins and minerals." http://www.1800petmeds.com/dog.asp?LV=78

      Commercial pet foods (available in supermarkets)
      DOGS
      · Chappie
      · Denes Senior
      · Beta Light and Senior
      · Hills Science Plan -adult canned, senior canned has least.
      -adult light dry, senior dry has least.
      · Pedigree Advance- all except Adult Chicken/rice + Light
      · Wafcol Veteran

      If you cannot find any of these in the grocery, try a feed and tack store (sometimes they carry dog food) or other specialty pet store. Or, you can request that a store carry or order in that brand of food for you, most stores are willing to do so (they might require that you buy a certain amount or all of it to order it in).

      I don't know how much you've looked into what dog foods are made of, but if by 'meat based' you mean they are mostly meat, that's not the case. Most commercial dog foods have some meat, but the bulk of the protein comes from corn or other grains.

      If all else fails, you may make your own dog's food, it's not as difficult as cooking for people, and you have complete control over what goes into your pet's diet. A good ratio is 1/3 meat, 1/3 starchy/carbohydrate (brown or regular rice, bran cereal, etc.), and 1/3 vegetables (avoid broccoli).
      http://www.recipezaar.com/224426
      http://www.recipezaar.com/220647
      http://www.recipezaar.com/250887
      http://www.recipezaar.com/222049
      http://www.homemadehealthypetfood.com/

      CHICKEN AND POTATO DIET
      (low protein low phosphorus, high potassium, low sodium) for Dogs

      * ¼ cup cooked chicken breast
      * 3 cups potato, boiled with skin
      * 2 tablespoons chicken fat
      * 1 ½ calcium carbonate tablets (600 milligrams calcium)
      * ½ multiple vitamin-mineral tablet

      Provides 689 kilocalories, 18.9 grams protein, 26.8 grams fat. Supports caloric needs of a 21-22 pound dog
      Provides phosphorus at 45 percent, potassium at 301 percent, sodium at 54 percent of a dog's daily needs. To feed this diet with a normal amount of phosphorus, substitute 4 bonemeal tablets for the 1 1/2 calcium carbonate tablets.
      ________________________________________
      The recipes below came from the this website http://www.gloryridge.com/kdrecipes.htm

      Chicken and Potato Diet
      (Low-protein, low-phosphorus, high-potassium, low-sodium)

      1/4cup cooked chicken breast

      3 cups potato, boiled with skin

      2 tablespoons chicken fat

      1 1/2 calcium carbonate tablets (600 milligrams calcium)

      1/2 multiple vitamin-mineral tablet

      Provides 689 kiocalories, 18.9 grams protein, 26.8 grams fat
      Supports caloric needs of a 21- to 22-pound dog
      Provides phosphorus at 45 percent, potassium at 301 per¬cent, sodium at 54 percent of a dog’s daily needs. To feed this diet with a normal amount of phosphorus, substitute 4 bone-meal tablets for the 1 1/2 calcium carbonate tablets.
      ________________________________________
      Beef and Potato Diet
      (Low-protein, low-phosphorus, high-potas¬sium, low-sodium)
      2 ounces lean ground beef (raw weight), cooked
      3 cups potato, boiled with skin
      2 tablespoons chicken fat
      1 1/2 calcium carbonate tablets (600 milligrams calcium)
      1/2 multiple vitamin-mineral tablet
      Provides 737 kilocalories, 18.6 grams protein, 32.5 grams fat
      Supports caloric needs of a 23- to 24-pound dog
      Provides phosphorus at 43 percent, potassium at 293 per¬cent, sodium at 54 percent of a dog’s daily needs. To feed this diet with a normal amount of phosphorus, substitute 4 bone-meal tablets for the 1 1/2 calcium carbonate tablets.
      ________________________________________
      Beef and Tapioca Diet
      (Low-protein, low-phosphorus, low-potasium, low-sodium)

      4 ounces lean ground beef (raw weight), cooked

      2 cups tapioca, cooked (125 grams dry before cooking)

      2 tablespoons chicken fat

      1 1/2 calcium carbonate tablets (600 milligrams calcium)

      1/2 multiple vitamin-mineral tablet

      Provides 845 kilocalories, 19.9 grams protein, 37.2 grams fat
      Supports caloric needs of a 28-pound dog
      Provides phosphorus at 18 percent, potassium at 29 percent, sodium at 55 percent of a dog’s daily needs. To feed this diet with a normal amount of phosphorus, substitute 5 to 6 bonemeal tablets for the 1 1/2calcium carbonate tablets.
      ________________________________________
      Chicken and Tapioca Diet
      (Low-protein, low-phosphorus, low-potassium, low-sodium)

      1/2 cup cooked chicken breast

      2 cups tapioca, cooked (125 grams dry before cooking)

      2 tablespoons chicken fat

      11/2 calcium carbonate tablets (600 milligrams calcium)

      1/2 multiple vitamin-mineral tablet
      Provides 763 kiocalories, 20.8 grams protein, 27.3 grams fat
      Supports caloric needs of a 24- to 25-pound dog
      Provides phosphorus at 20 percent, potassium at 22 per¬cent, sodium at 55 percent of a dog’s daily needs. To feed this diet with a normal amount of phosphorus, substitute 5 to 6 bonemeal tablets for the 11/2 calcium carbonate tablets.

      More sites, more recipes
      http://www.gloryridge.com/kdrecipes.htm

      http://www.trurovet.com/petLibrary/recipes/CanineLowProteinLowSodiumDiet.pdf
      http://www.naturalcanine.com/html/recipes_3.htmlv

      Good luck!

  33. QUESTION:
    why is fur under poodles eyes turning black?
    We were recently adopted by this little cream colored poodle. The vet gave her a clean bill of health so I took her to get groomed (hair was matted bad) but noticed in past few days that the area under her eyes is turning black! Is it from crying? How can I get it off? Also, any tips on how to break her jumping habit? I can't leave the room without her following and trying to jump up on me!! It is so annoying and I am the only one shedoes it too! HELP! Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      Its actually a very common problem with poodles.
      A diet change may be one place to start.
      What kind of food do you feed her?
      Try switching her gradually to a premium dog food.
      Give it a couple months after changing and see if it helps.
      You can also get a few capsules of tetracycline from your vet and sprinkle it on her food for about a week and it will speed up the process. It could be a yeast infection developing under her eyes because they stay moist all the time. For some reason vets tend to over look it until you ask them if that could be whats going on.
      I have a white poodle taht had the same problem, we switched her to Canidae and did the tetracycline its almost completly cleared up.
      Food has ALOT to do with it. It can be caused by allergies to certain things in the food and then comes the secondary part which would be the yeast that I mentioned...

  34. QUESTION:
    Can you help me pick either Purina Cat Chow Complete Formula or Friskies Sensations Cat dry cats food?
    i wanted to get either of them, but still not sure which ine is better for the kittens and it mother or like which one they will like to eat better?Plz help!!

    • ANSWER:
      I'll do a comparison for you:-

      (Note, when I make food comparison, I only compare the most basic ingredient list - and I am by no mean an EXPERT, I just offer what I know.)

      Purina Cat Chow Complete Formula Dry

      Ingredient:-

      Poultry by-product meal, corn meal, ground whole wheat, corn gluten meal, soy flour, brewers rice, beef tallow preserved with mixed-tocopherols (source of vitamin E), fish meal, brewers dried yeast, natural flavors, phosphoric acid, potassium chloride, tetra sodium pyrophosphate, calcium carbonate, calcium chloride, choline chloride, dicalcium phosphate, salt, taurine, zinc sulfate, ferrous sulfate, vitamin supplements (E, A, B-12, D-3), l-alanine, riboflavin supplement, niacin, calcium pantothenate, manganese sulfate, biotin, thiamine mononitrate, folic acid, pyridoxine hydrochloride, copper sulfate, citric acid, menadione sodium bisulfite complex (source of vitamin K activity), calcium iodate, sodium selenite.

      ----------------------------------------------------------

      Poultry by-product meal, fish meal, are all very disturbing sources of meat for your cat. You want to avoid this at all cost! The meat most likely comes from a source called 4D - Dead, Dying, Diseased or Disabled, and that includes roadkill and euthanized cats and dogs.

      Corn meal, ground whole wheat, corn gluten meal, soy flour, brewers rice,brewers dried yeast are what we called cheap fillers.

      Many commercial pet foods contain fillers that have little or no nutritional value. Products like corn and corncobs, cereal by-products, feathers, soy, cottonseed hulls, peanut hulls, citrus pulp, screening, weeds, and straw are often included as inexpensive fillers or low-grade fiber content.

      These fillers are often added as pet food ingredients to help decrease the overall cost of the food, especially when pet food manufacturers attempt to keep their pet foods at a certain price point despite rising manufacturing, marketing, shipping, and related costs.

      ------------------------------------

      Friskies Sensation Dry

      Ingredients;_

      Ground yellow corn, corn gluten meal, poultry by-product meal, meat and bone meal, corn germ meal, animal fat preserved with mixed-tocopherols (form of Vitamin E), ocean fish meal, soybean meal, brewers dried yeast, phosphoric acid, animal digest, potassium chloride, tetra sodium pyrophosphate, salt, choline chloride, tuna meal, salmon meal, added color (Yellow 6, Red 40, Yellow 5), taurine, zinc sulfate, ferrous sulfate, Vitamin E supplement, niacin, manganese sulfate, calcium carbonate, Vitamin A supplement, calcium pantothenate, thiamine mononitrate (Vitamin B-1), copper sulfate, riboflavin supplement (Vitamin B-2), Vitamin B-12 supplement, pyridoxine hydrochloride (Vitamin B-6), folic acid, Vitamin D-3 supplement, calcium iodate, biotin, menadione sodium bisulfite complex (source of Vitamin K activity), sodium selenite.

      -----------------------------------------------------

      Poultry by-product meal, meat and bone meal
      ocean fish meal, animal digest,tuna meal, salmon meal

      (refer to the above on why it's bad for your cat)

      Ground yellow corn, corn gluten meal, corn germ meal, soybean meal, brewers dried yeast

      (refer to the above on why it's bad for your cat)

      Added color (Yellow 6, Red 40, Yellow 5) are dye and coloring agents. Coloring agents are often added to pet foods to modify the appearance of highly processed foods, providing an artificial "rich and meaty" look in an attempt to make the food appear more appealing to pet owners. Even pet brands that market themselves as healthy and holistic are guilty of using artificial colors.

      -------------------------------------------------

      There you have it. If you have to choose the lesser of the two evil, Purina Cat Chow it will be for not having as much fillers as Friskies and without added coloring. The so called meat is listed first.

      I do suggest you look into some other better food compared to these two. One to try would be Nutro Natural Complete Care, although not premium, it should fit your budget.

  35. QUESTION:
    How to stop my dog bite her back all the times?
    Last years the Vet cost me over 5 for her allergies, so is there any way I can put on her back to stop it?
    I am just asking.

    Thanks.
    @Loyal Person@ LoL, I never mention about shot.
    Beagle.

    • ANSWER:
      Are there any other symptoms besides her biting her back? Skin sores or lesions? A rash?

      My dog is extremely allergic to flea & tic saliva, and this was exacerbated by her diet, which had a lot of grain in it. She was virtually a tic magnet! Her skin turned pink & swelled, a *lot* of her thin coat fell out, and she would nip at even me if I touched her, because it was very painful.

      I got her a flea-tic treatment that they put on their skin, to kill both fleas & tics for a month. Then, noticed that --although the continual itching was greatly reduced-- she would still have *terrible* scratching & biting spells for one hour after every feeding. . . she was having an allergic reaction to something in her food. (I suspected the grain.)

      So, I switched to a *NON*-grain dogfood, which does *NOT* heat the omega-3 oils, but adds them to the other part after they have cooled. She has *no* bad reaction to that.

      I also have to supplement her diet with: MSM, *Raw* Organic Unfiltered Apple Cider Vinegar, and Organic Expellar Pressed Coconut Oil. The MSM and the Vinegar normalize the PH of the body, so that the tics & fleas do not find her inviting. . . .

      This year was reported to be a VERY BAD tic infestation, yet, the only time I found any on her, was when she had recently missed a dose of either MSM or 'ROUACV'. Her skin never turned pink, or swelled, or became painful . . . and, her coat remained intact throughout the summer (except when she went a few days without her MSM/'ROUACV', when she began biting her back legs again).

      The Coconut Oil improves digestion, calms the nervous system, is anti-inflammatory,
      and improves allergic conditions . . . among other great attributes.

      I feed her twice daily, and she gets 1/2 dose of each supplement with each meal.
      (*It is **important** NOT to give too much MSM, as that can cause diarrhea!)

      MSM and DMSO: Alternative Health Group
      http://alternative-health-group.org/msm-dmso.html

      MSM & Parasites
      http://www.msm-info.com/

      Recommended dosing is given here:
      www.wolfcreekranch. net/msm_42.html
      (Remove the space-^-before hitting 'Go!', after copy-pasting the web-address to the URL box.)

      My 60 lb dog does well with a regular dose of *3/16 of a tsp with each meal* (a total of 6/16 tsp daily).

      Regarding the vinegar . . . At first my dog was sensitive to it, and I suspect that she had yeast. But, after treating her with the MSM and the Coconut oil --both of which are anti-yeast-- she now eats it with every meal without any reaction. . . .

      Apple Cider Vinegar for Dogs (uses; dose)
      www.earthclinic.com/ Pets/acvfordogs.html
      (Copy paste^ to the URL box, & remove the 1 space in it before hitting 'Go!'.)

      "...Coconut Oil for PETs!"
      www.onlynaturalpet. com/products/Nutiva- Organic-Coconut-Oil /255005.aspx

      An ounce of *Prevention* is worth a TON of 'cure'!!! (;

  36. QUESTION:
    Is it possible to treat my dog ear infection at home?
    she keeps pawing her ears, there is a strong odor coming from her ear, and she is shaking her head alot! i know she has a ear infection and she has had a couple in the past! she is deadly afraid of the vet and i was wondering if there is anything i can put it in or should i take her to the vet? please give me things i can do to treat her ear infection at home if possible
    my dog eats innova and there r no grains in it! she is a golden retriever and they are just prone to ear infections! thanks everyone tried the vinegar and it helped!

    • ANSWER:
      Try this homemade ear cleaner. It has just been a miracle to my dogs when I found it. They don't get ear infections anymore. The ingredients are all available from a pharmacy without a prescription. Mix them in a 8 oz. bottle that had an applicator tip (like a hair coloring bottle from Sally Beauty Supply. Try to get one that has measurement lines on the outside). I would make some up and use it every day when you see your dog scratching their ear or if it smells or has discharge. Squirt some in and massage the ear canal well. When is cleared up, use it weekly for prevention. Try to trim any hair from the opening in the ear to help air get to it.

      6 oz. isopropyl (rubbing) alcohol (try to get the 91% alcohol )
      1 ½ teaspoons boric acid powder
      **Mix well until the powder dissolves**
      add 2 oz. white vinegar, then add one teaspoon of Betadine antiseptic
      **shake well now and every time before using**

      Also go read the ingredients panel on your dog food as grain allergies (grains with gluten, similar to celiac disease in a human) might be contributing to yeast overgrowth and ear infections. Most vets were not trained in pet nutrition and will recommend popular foods (or the Science D*** they sell) but not tell you to eliminate grains. Check these sites to understand good dog foods:

      http://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/
      http://www.dogfoodanalysis.com/

  37. QUESTION:
    How can I help my dog's skin?
    I live in Florida, and have a 1/2 lhasa, 1/2 peek-a-poo. He's 10 years old, and he spent the first 9 years in PA with my family, where he never had any major skin problems. But now, he seems "itchy in his own skin". I give him flea medication and treat the lawn with a pet-safe insecticide. I've cut out corn and wheat products from his diet. Still, not much relief. I've tried vets, but all they want to do is sell meds to me without diagnosing him (the steroid and cortizone shots had little or no effect). Anyone have any ideas on what might be wrong or how to help him?

    • ANSWER:
      He sounds as if he has allergies and dry skin. Poor baby. You can give him Brewers Yeast tablets to help with the dry skin and put a bit of mineral oil in his food to help also. You can also use olive oil for this, if you do not have mineral oil available.

      Use of baby rated sunscreen when he is outside, just to avoid burning and irritating his sensitive skin.

      Check to see if you can find some l-lysine tablets, they are a skin support tablet which is actually an enzyme produced by the body, he may not be producing enough of it.

      My family and I have used these suggestions for our dogs when they have had dry skin and/or hot spots, and have found them to be a lot more helpful and less damaging than steroids and cortisone.

      Best of luck to you and your pup.

  38. QUESTION:
    Will a nuetered boy cat get along with a spayed girl kitten?
    I have a boy cat that's fixed, and he's almost a year old. He's really friendly and gets along wih dogs easily. Boy dogs and girl dogs. If I got new young/kitten girl spayed cat, will they get along?

    or is it better to get a boy kitten?

    • ANSWER:
      I would go with a spayed female, like you said because two males could possibly have territorial issues.

      If you haven't brought the kitten into your home yet, when you see him next wipe him or her down with a towel and bring it home with you. Set it very casually on the floor, and let your cat approach it, (don't bring your cat to the towel like you're showing him, let him find it on his own). If you have plenty of time in advance, then leave the towel around for several days, and even bring more towels with the kittens’ scent. Place them several places in the house, in the same way you “planted” the first one. It may also be helpful to rub your cat down with a towel also and bring it to the kitten.

      When it’s time for the kitten to come home for the first time, as you are distracting your resident cat, have a friend, (someone who doesn’t live with you) bring the kitten in and place him or her in a room with the door closed. Also ask your friend to get the food and water dishes and the litter box set up in the closed room. Include toys and a bed, (or just a box with towels). The litter box should be in the opposite side of the room from the food, water and bed. DO NOT set up the kitten’s room before you bring him or her home. This will only confuse your cat. The point is to make your older cat think that the kitten suddenly (and magically!) appeared, without your knowledge.

      Your cat will approach the door and pick up on the scent of the kitten. Don’t get discouraged or worried if you hear some hissing and growling, as this is very common. For the first couple days, spend a limited time in the room with the kitten and make sure to give your resident cat plenty of affection, even more than usual. Another helpful thing to try is to attach two toys with a string, and leave them on opposite sides of the door, so the cats can play together.

      Cats are very territorial animals, and this is why you don’t want him to see the kitten as an intruder that YOU brought home and shoved in his face. Cats are very much creatures of habit and routine, so when his routine is disrupted, don’t be surprised if he becomes very angry. You must be the judge of when they should meet face-to-face, but don’t push things too quickly, it may take a few days of sniffing each other under the door before they have settled down. When you believe they have calmed down and are ready, casually open the door a few inches. Remember, you are being nonchalant about this; do not force them on each other. You should pick a time after both cats have just eaten; feed them a treat that you know they will love, (like some of their favorite cooked meat). They will be content and their bellies will be full, so they’re less likely to want to exert a lot of energy in a cat fight. Supervise them and don’t be surprised if the older cat swats at or fights with the kitten. Don’t step in and separate them unless someone’s getting hurt worse than just a scratch on the nose. The kitten will probably retreat into his or her room at which time you should close the door. Increase the time you allow them to interact each day. Don’t leave them together unattended until you are confident that they comfortable with each other. Be patient. It may take a few weeks or even a few months, but if all goes well they will soon become the best of friends.

      Extra tip: to ease the initial tension of introduction, rub each cat down with brewer's yeast powder. Brewer's yeast is available in natural food stores. It's all natural, full of vitamin B, and will actually go good for the cats to lick it off. The smell of the brewer’s yeast helps disguise the foreign odors and each cat will basically smell the same. Don't use anything like baby powder because the talc isn't good for the cat to breathe or ingest. You should use the same grooming tools (combs, brushes, towels, mitts) on both cats to transfer their scents to one another.

      I hope that helps. Good luck!

  39. QUESTION:
    What are some of the best strategies for going vegetarian or vegan?
    I think about it often, but once my nose smells bacon, it's all over.

    • ANSWER:
      1) Educate yourself- Most people live in a complete bubble of ignorance. Not just about food but about EVERYTHING. If you do some research to see how the world's meat is produced you will find it harder to eat animal products. check out .meat.org/, peta.org, vrg.org for starters

      2) Purchase Vegan Cook Books. the Veganomicon is my go to vegan cook book for when I want cook satisfying meal. However any large book store now a days will carry quite a few different veggie cook books. These cook books will help you learn how to create familiar flavors that are cruelty free. Eventually you will be able to look at any recipe and "Veganize" it

      3) Stock up- Have vegan snack in your purse and vegan foods in your house. If you have plenty to choose from it will require less will power to get started .Also I love the tofukey roast, tofurkey deli slices, smart life bacon, and Amy's burritos. I also inevitably always have the stuff I need to make guacamole. I also suggest you get some nutritional yeast and soy`milk. (those two items will insure you never run low on any nutrients which is possible when you are learning the new food pyramid that has become your diet)

      4) Find Vegan Restaurants- Eating out is a big part of many people's social life. Try to find vegan restraunts to go to. I have meet a few LAZY vegetarians/vegans who gave up because they got sick of cooking at home. Also note that many non vegan exclusive restaurants have vegan options. Papa John's Garden fresh pizza without cheese, 5 guys burger and fries french fries and tofu hot dogs ( Bun is vegetarian but not vegan), Art Vanda lay Burrito at Moes (Vegetarian, vegan is you ask for no dairy) and you can find something to eat at most Mexican and middle eastern restaurants

      5) Make Vegan Friends- Don't get rid of your old friends of course and most of them will think your diet is too "strange" to try, but having a few friends who will come over and share in your cheese less pizza you ordered or help you find a pair of cute heels that aren't leather as well will make daily life as a vegan easier. Also having some emotional support in the begging will help. Especially when your old friends and your family try to sabotage your new lifestyle for you "own good".

      6) If you break down don't beat yourself up just try again. I quit meat cold tofurkey (ha ha) right after watching the famouse "meet your meat" video, but it's not that simple for everyone. After I saw the video I tried to disprove the information it presented and couldn't. So if you eat a hamburger after you go veggie don't quit just seek out more information. Ultimately new input will lead to new behaviors.

      * Try Soy Bacon. It's actually really good.

  40. QUESTION:
    My dog is itching and scratching constantly?
    One of my Australian Cattle Dogs has extreme dermal allergies. The vet has tried cortisone, allergy injections, top brand flea medication, different diets, Benadryl etc. Nothing helps!! The dog is miserable and I am about to go nuts myself. Has anyone tried a product that actually works?

    • ANSWER:
      It truly depends on what your dog is allergic too.

      If it's a food allergy, then you have to put the dog on a presciption or homemade diet for two weeks then slowly add foods in until you find the issue.

      If it's a flea allergy, then keep them flea free as possible.

      As an owner of a dog with food allergies, I know your dog is miserable. It took me a year of trial and error to find what my dog could stand to eat.

      During that time, she was on steroids, chloraphornaramine..etc, etc. but it wasn't until I got her on a diet that worked that either of us got any peace.

      I don't know what your dog is allergic too but if it's corn or wheat, most dry dog foods aren't going to work. It takes weeks for them to get it out of their system. Your vet can try a prescription diet (expensive) and my dog hated it. I finally found that my dog can eat Holistic brand Lamb food. She gets no treats without me making them personally. She gets no food, dry or wet, from anyone but me.

      If it's a food issue, have your vet try a prescription diet without wheat or corn products. My dog has a pork allergy. She's a strange one.

      It'll take two weeks to a month to see if it's working. If it doesn't, you start all over again.

      If she has a yeast skin infection (her skin smells sweaty and sour), you'll need to give her medicated baths or oatmeal baths depending on the extent.

      Make sure she's on flea repellant. Even if a flea jumps on, bites, and jumps off--if she's allergic she'll still get welts

      Good luck. It's trial and error. First thing is to figure out what's causing it.

      Benadryl takes the edge off but doesn't stop it.

  41. QUESTION:
    My dog has these dark redish spots on her belly?
    She is a Weiner dog and I haven't seen these on her before. My mom won't take her to the vet. Im worried help.

    • ANSWER:
      It sounds like a skin infection. This can usually be cleared up without a vet visit with constant disinfecting. Clean the skin at least twice a day with povidone iodine mixed with warm water. The more you disinfect the sooner it will heal. You could also rub some coconut oil on the affected skin which will help keep it disinfected between cleanings. Coconut oil is antimicrobial and very moisturizing. Just use the kind you cook with. But if it continues to spread despite the cleaning you should see a vet. If it keeps reoccurring you may want to consider a better food that is lower in carbohydrates. Also do not use an oatmeal shampoo. Oatmeal is a carbohydrate. Bacteria and yeast feed on carbohydrates, which causes them to spread even more. Here is an excellent video on how to disinfect skin.

      http://www.youtube.com/profile?user=MercolaHealthyPets#p/u/22/ng3XqDSIvq8

  42. QUESTION:
    How much of these would it take to hurt/kill a dog?
    How much/many....
    chocolate (bakers,dark, milk, white?
    Onions
    Grapes
    Garlic
    alcohol
    and other things i didn't think of that are fatal

    Thanks so much!
    Im not going to feed my dog any
    its just in case he does eat something and i wont panick too much
    Im not going to feed my dog any
    its just in case he does eat something and i wont panick too much

    • ANSWER:
      Milk Chocolate:

      1 ounce per pound of the dog's body weight, meaning a 50 lb dog can consume up to 50 ounces of milk chocolate before succumbing to theobromine poisoning.

      Dark Chocolate:

      1 ounce per 9 lbs of the dog's body weight. This means a 50 lb dog can consume up to 5 1/2 ounces of dark chocolate before succumbing to theobromine poisoning.

      Baker's and semisweet chocolate is about the same as dark chocolate.

      White chocolate contains such trace amounts of theobromine that it's practically irrelevant. The dog would get full and/or ill from sugar overload long before the chocolate made it sick.

      Alcohol has a much more intense effect on dogs. Giving your 50 lb dog a beer will have a greater effect on it than it does on a 150 lb adult human. Alcohol easily causes seizure, coma, or death in dogs.

      Onions and garlic cause anemia. I'm not sure how many the dog would have to eat before every blood vessel in the body burst and they died of asphyxiation or bled to death.

      Acetaminophen in any mount is dangerous to a dog. Dogs can take it, contrary to popular belief, but the dosage is vastly different than it is in humans and must be monitored closely by a veterinarian to avoid severe stomach, liver, and kidney damage.

      Here's a list of some major no-nos:
      Baby food: may contain onion powder. Onion is toxic.

      Cooked meat/fat: Charred or smoldering organic matter contains carcinogens. No barbecue for the dog.

      Fish bones or cooked bones of any other kind: Fish bones easily obstruct the digestive tract. Cooked bones, even large ones, splinter far more easily and can cause an obstruction. Digestive obstructions, tears, or other injuries caused by splintered bones rarely correct themselves without surgery and are potentially lethal.

      Caffeine: Can have serious impact on the cardiovascular or nervous system in dogs.

      Soda, coffee, tea, etc: Contain caffeine

      Chocolate: Contains caffeine and theobromine. Theobromine is highly toxic to dogs. Ingested in large enough quantities and it is LETHAL. Dark or baker's chocolate is deadly. Milk chocolate is heavily diluted and is typically nonfatal unless consumed in large quantities. Any amount of chocolate can make your dog very ill, however. Interestingly, theobromine is also toxic to humans, however we can metabolize it fast enough to negate the effect. Dogs metabolize theobromine more slowly and therefore succumb to its effects.

      Citrus: Citrus oil causes vomiting. Avoid unless you enjoy cleaning up after a sick dog.

      Grapes/raisins: Contain toxins that damage the kidneys. It is unknown which chemicals in grapes cause this, but it is a known fact that something in them is highly toxic to dogs.

      Macadamia nuts: Cause the same kidney problems that grapes do.

      Cooked liver: Can cause Vitamin A toxicity which in turn causes problems in muscles and bones.

      Spoiled food or garbage: You don't know what's growing on that food or what other foods may be mixed in with it, especially if it's not your own garbage, and may contain bacteria or potentially toxic foods. Keep a lid on the trash.

      Mushrooms: Many varieties can cause shock and death.

      Alcohol: The effects of alcohol are far, far stronger on a dog than on a human and can easily cause coma or death.

      Raw dough: Especially if it contains yeast or other leavening ingredients, raw dough can cause stomach bloat or colon impaction.

      Onions or Garlic: Any kind of onion or garlic in any form--powder, raw, cooked, etc--causes anemia. Do. Not. Feed.

      Antifreeze (Ethylene Glycol): You'd think this would be a given but antifreeze smells and tastes sweet. Dogs aren't as likely as, say, cattle, to ingest antifreeze but it does happen. Ethylene Glycol poisoning, at least in humans, typically mimics alcohol intoxication or poisoning. Any amount of ethylene glycol ingestion, even the smallest lick, is a medical emergency.

      Xylitol: Artificial sweetener contained in many sugar-free gums and candies. It is known to cause seizures, lethargy, and weakness in dogs.

      Ibuprofen: Smells sweet and may therefore be tempting to dogs. Ibuprofen causes ulceration rather easily in dogs. It can perforate the stomach lining. It can cause a decrease in blood flow to the kidneys.

      Acetaminophen: Tylenol, Excedrin, Percoset, Paracetamol, etc. In large quantities can cause liver damage or failure, damage to or destruction of red blood cells, and/or anemia. Far more toxic to cats than to dogs, however, proper dosage for a dog MUST be obtained from a veterinarian. Bottle dosages are for a 120-150 lb human, not a 30-70 lb dog. Dogs also metabolize acetaminophen at different rates than humans. Overdose is typical when administered to dogs by owners. Consider it toxic and get a pain killer or anti inflammatory approved for use on dogs from your veterinarian. No veterinarian will prescribe acetaminophen due to the risk of poisoning or overdose.

  43. QUESTION:
    What should you do if your hamster has wet tail?
    I don't reall know what it is but my hamster has diaria and my mom said it was wet tail
    sorry I have to add I don't have enuoph money to take him to the vets I'm so sad I just got him and i keep his pen clean all the time and give him nice new water and food and I love and care for him I just bought him some toys and I did give him bread earlyier I dont want him to die hes the cutest hamster I ever had and hes really nice too I just dont know what to do

    • ANSWER:
      Thats so sad! I really hope he doesn't die.
      Don't worry, it most likely wasn't your fault that it caused it. Often stress during weaning causes this.
      Keep your hamster in a warm, dry cage with good ventilation. Give your hamster warm fluids, because dehydration could cause its death. You can try feeding it through a syringe without a needle or a juicebox straw if he doesn't drink from a bowl.
      Unflavoured pedialite, availiable in most grocery stores, can be fed to your hamster until the vetrinarian reccomends something else. This can be used as an emergency rehydration fluid. Also, remove food for the first 24 hours.
      Dri tail has also helped many hamsters to recover from wet tail if you cant afford a vet. You can buy this at a pet store.
      Since stress causes this, lots of vitamin B can help you avoid this in the future. One way to give your hamster lots of vitamin B is to feed your hamster yeast. Feeding your hamster nutritional yeast or half a plain yeast pill weekly can help. Avoid feeding bakers yeast, because it has a bitter taste to hamsters. A pinch of nutritional yeast (which you can find in most health food stores) or half a plain yeast pill (yeast pills are found in pet stores in the cat and dog section)
      Good Luck and I really hope your hamster gets better!
      Feel free to email me at katrina_649@hotmail.com if you have any other questions.

  44. QUESTION:
    Can hamsters eat food other than hamster food? Can they have vegetables , nuts or bread and not die?
    My kids are wondering if it is okay for them to eat food. I say of course but is that right?

    • ANSWER:
      They can have toasted or untoasted bread , and nuts without shells, and all the following:
      FRUITS:
      Apple (seedless)
      Banana
      Blackberries
      Blueberries
      Cantaloupe.
      Cherries
      Cranberries
      Grapes(seedless)
      Lychee
      Mango
      Melon
      Peaches (no stone)
      Plums (no pits)
      Raspberries
      Raspberry Leaves (helpful for diarrhea)
      Strawberries

      VEGGIES:
      Asparagus
      Bean Sprouts
      Bok Choy
      Broccoli
      Cabbage (Limited amounts)
      Carrots
      Cauliflower
      Celery
      Chard
      Chestnuts
      Chickweed
      Chicory
      Clover
      Corn on the Cob
      Cucumbers
      Dandelion Leaves
      Endive
      Green Beans
      Kale
      Parsnips
      Peas
      Radicchio
      Romaine Lettuce
      Spinach
      Squash
      Sweet Potatoes
      Sweet bell Peppers
      Swiss Chard
      Turnip
      Water Chestnuts
      Water Cress
      Zucchini

      MEATS AND PROTAIN FOODS:
      Cooked Ground Beef (Rinse well in hot water to remove any grease)
      Cooked Chicken or Turkey (Steamed or baked)
      Low Fat Cottage Cheese
      Fish Cod (Cooked removing bones and skin)
      Grasshoppers (Pet Shop)
      Mealworms (Pet Shop)
      Crickets (Pet Shop)
      Bread(whole grain no white bread) soaked in milk ( Low Fat, Skim, Soy)
      Eggs ( boiled or scrambled)
      Plain Tofu
      Plain Low Fat Yogurt
      Dog Biscuits (No Garlic, onion, or onion powder)
      Monkey Chow
      Lab Blocks

      OTHER FOODS:
      Buckwheat
      Baby Food(low sugar and no onion or garlic)
      Cheese (mild cheeses in moderation)
      Cooked Plain Brown Rice
      Cooked Pasta(Wheat or Spinach would be better)
      Dry toast(Also helpful for diarrhea
      Flax seed
      Low or Sugarless Cereals
      Pumpkin Seeds (unsalted)
      Nuts (No almonds)
      Sesame Seeds
      Soybeans(Roasted no salt)
      Squash seeds
      Lentils
      Oatmeal(dry or soaked in skim, soy or lowfat milk)
      Nutritional Yeast
      Bran and Wheat Germ (Refrigerated goes bad fast)
      Peanuts (unsalted)
      Alfafa
      Unsalted Popcorn (no butter)

      FOODS TO AVOID:
      Almonds (Contains Cyanic Acid)
      Apple Seeds
      Canned food
      Chocolate
      Candies
      Chips and Junk food
      Pork Products
      Potatoes (Raw)
      Raw Kidney Beans
      Eggplant
      Fool's Parsley
      Grape Seeds
      Avocado (Contains Cardiac Glycosides)
      Raw Rhubarb
      Tomato leaves
      Oranges or Tangerines(no citrus fruits)
      No watermelon (the water content is high causes diarrhea)
      Cherry Stone
      Peach Stone & Leaves
      Apricot Stone
      Lemon or Lime
      Jams and jellies
      Spices
      Garlic
      Onions
      Leeks
      Scallions
      Chives
      Pickles

      Hope this helps!

  45. QUESTION:
    My dog is constantly scratching. What can I do to help her?
    I have taken her to the vet several times for this and he gives her an antibiotic. It clears up for a little bit but comes right back. It is very frustrating. And now she has started not being able to control her urine either.

    • ANSWER:
      Shawn...

      Well...the vet should at least attempt to diagnose what may be causing this without just prescribing an antibiotic. Did he take any skin scrapings to test for the possibility of mange or a possible yeast infection? Did he check her coat to see if fleas may be a possibility? Some dogs are extremely sensitive to them -- even a bite from one can be terribly irritating for them.

      Another possibility...and it wouldn't surprise me in the slightest...she may be showing signs of a food allergy. What are you feeding her? Anything that's cheap and handy from the grocery store or have you really explored what ingredients are being included in her food?

      Things to make sure you stay clear of in a dog's diet:

      By-products of any kind
      Wheat (high allergen)
      Corn or corn glutens (high allergen)
      Large percentages of various grains (a grain-free food would be better)
      Meat or Bone Meals
      Unidentified "animal" fats
      Soy (high allergen)
      Some dogs have sensitivity to chicken (try salmon, venison or lamb instead)
      Heavy chemicals used to preserve product freshness (like BHA, etc.) look for "natural" preservatives
      Beet Pulp (high allergen)

      Better quality foods often command a better price. There is usually a reason for that. And most of those brands are NEVER found at a grocery store.

      Look for things like: Orijen, Taste of the Wild, Wellness (Core) or Blue Buffalo/Blue Buffalo Wilderness or their new line of Blue Buffalo Grain-Free. These are just a few suggestions -- there are plenty of others. But start learning how to read ingredient labels -- that information means more to your dog than you might think!

      As far as the problems with her pottying...she may be dealing with more than just one issue at a time. There is a possibility that she is also dealing with a UTI (Uninary Tract Infection). A urinalysis can be done to see if this is what could be occurring.

      Good luck!

  46. QUESTION:
    How do I get rid of fleas from the home? I have no pets but got fleas.?

    • ANSWER:
      Here are some home remedies that may be of help, especially if you prefer to avoid chemicals. Good Luck!

      Feline Flea Proofing
      Add to the food for each adult cat:
      1/2 level teaspoon brewer's yeast
      1/4 level teaspoon garlic powder

      Flea Destroyer
      Set up a plate of sudsy water with a light hovering over it. The fleas are attracted to this and drown themselves.

      Flea Repellent (for cats)
      1/8 teaspoon tamari soy sauce
      1 crushed whole clove
      1/8 teaspoon water
      1 fresh garlic clove
      Marinate the garlic in the liquid for about 10 minutes and then remove it.
      Add 1/16 teaspoon soy liquid to each 1/2 cup cat food. Use this repellent immediately.

      Flea Repellent Pillows
      These pillows are for dogs.
      Source: Glen Brook Farms Herbs and Such
      2 parts pennyroyal
      1 part thyme
      1 part wormwood
      Herbs may be cut or whole; construct a pillow for your pet to sleep on and then stuff it with the pennyroyal, thyme, wormwood. This makes a nice gift for those favorite dogs in your life. These herbs help to repel fleas naturally and without harsh chemicals.

      Flea Repellent Sleep Pillows
      For cats
      2 parts sage or rosemary
      1 part catnip
      1 part chamomile
      For dogs
      2 parts pennyroyal
      1 part thyme
      1 part wormwood
      Herbs may be used cut or whole. Mix enough to stuff a 2-foot square pillow for a cat or a 3-foot square (or larger) pillow for a dog. Sew the pillowcase out of a tough, washable fabric such as denim.

      Herbal Flea Powder
      Use herbs in powdered form only.
      2 ounces pennyroyal (use sage or rosemary for cats)
      1 ounce rosemary
      1 ounce wormwood
      1 teaspoon cayenne pepper
      Mix and store in a covered container. Use as often as any flea powder and rub into skin.
      DO NOT LET POWDER GET INTO PET'S EYES.

      Herbal Flea Powder
      1 part eucalyptus powder
      1 part pennyroyal powder (use sage or rosemary for cats)
      1 part fennel powder
      1 part yellow dock powder
      Combine all ingredients in a shaker top jar and shake to mix.
      Apply to your pet's fur by brushing backward with your hand or comb and sprinkling the powder into the roots of the hairs. Concentrate on the neck, back, and belly. Use just enough to add a little odor to the hairs.
      For severe flea infestations, treat daily; otherwise, use two or three times a week.

      http://www.recipegoldmine.com/pets/pets.html

  47. QUESTION:
    Is it OK to feed dogs table scraps?
    Examples: bites of chicken, steak, fish, etc..., dry cereal, carrots, basically anything except chocolate, grapes, and raisins. Is all of this OK?

    • ANSWER:
      Do not feed your dog fatty meats or onions. Cooked or boiled chicken without skin, fat and bones is okay. Some plain white rice okay.

      Fatty foods are very bad for your dog.

      Best to feed a good formula dog food - it has the nutrients your dog needs. There are websites for healthy homemade dog food also.

      ************************************************
      Pancreatitis is a perplexing disease in dogs and cats for two reasons, no two cases are alike and we really do not know what causes the condition. Both the severity and the outcome of pancreatitis is quite variable. Some dogs and cats show only minimal discomfort and an elevation in pancreatic enzymes while in others pancreatitis is a life-threatening disease. When pancreatitis is severe, many organs of the body are affected and the prognosis (chance of recovery) is poor.

      Cause:
      The cause of pancreatitis in dogs and cats and humans remains unclear. However, there are certain things that we know that are associated with the disease. The first is diet. In both humans and dogs it appears that diets too rich in fat increases the risk of this disease.
      http://www.2ndchance.info/pancreatitis.htm

      Onion and garlic poisoning Top
      Onions and garlic are other dangerous food ingredients that cause sickness in dogs, cats and also livestock. Onions and garlic contain the toxic ingredient thiosulphate. Onions are more of a danger.

      Pets affected by onion toxicity will develop haemolytic anaemia, where the pet’s red blood cells burst while circulating in its body.

      At first, pets affected by onion poisoning show gastroenteritis with vomiting and diarrhoea. They will show no interest in food and will be dull and weak. The red pigment from the burst blood cells appears in an affected animal’s urine and it becomes breathless. The breathlessness occurs because the red blood cells that carry oxygen through the body are reduced in number.

      The poisoning occurs a few days after the pet has eaten the onion. All forms of onion can be a problem including dehydrated onions, raw onions, cooked onions and table scraps containing cooked onions and/or garlic. Left over pizza, Chinese dishes and commercial baby food containing onion, sometimes fed as a supplement to young pets, can cause illness.

      Onion poisoning can occur with a single ingestion of large quantities or with repeated meals containing small amounts of onion. A single meal of 600 to 800 grams of raw onion can be dangerous whereas a ten-kilogram dog, fed 150 grams of onion for several days, is also likely to develop anaemia. The condition improves once the dog is prevented from eating any further onion

      While garlic also contains the toxic ingredient thiosulphate, it seems that garlic is less toxic and large amounts would need to be eaten to cause illness.

      Macadamia nuts are another concern. A recent paper written by Dr. Ross McKenzie, a Veterinary Pathologist with the Department of Primary Industries, points to the danger of raw and roasted macadamia nuts for pets.

      The toxic compound is unknown but the affect of macadamia nuts is to cause locomotory difficulties. Dogs develop a tremor of the skeletal muscles, and weakness or paralysis of the hindquarters. Affected dogs are often unable to rise and are distressed, usually panting. Some affected dogs have swollen limbs and show pain when the limbs are manipulated.

      Dogs have been affected by eating as few as six macadamia kernels (nuts without the shell) while others had eaten approximately forty kernels. Some dogs had also been given macadamia butter.

      Other potential dangers Top
      # Pear pips, the kernels of plums, peaches and apricots, apple core pips (contain cyanogenic glycosides resulting in cyanide posioning)
      # Potato peelings and green looking potatoes
      # Rhubarb leaves
      # Mouldy/spoiled foods
      # Alcohol
      # Yeast dough
      # Coffee grounds, beans & tea (caffeine)
      # Hops (used in home brewing)
      # Tomato leaves & stems (green parts)
      # Broccoli (in large amounts)
      # Raisins and grapes

      http://www.petalia.com.au/Templates/StoryTemplate_Process.cfm?specie=Dogs&story_no=257#ct-4

  48. QUESTION:
    what are we going to do now that a recession is inevitable?
    how will i continue schooling if we cannot pay for it, im last two senior years?
    we are not rich
    what will everyone else now do?

    • ANSWER:
      In times of recession, we change our assessments on what is necessity and what is luxury. For years, we drank water - not soda, not tea, seldom coffee - simply because soda, tea and coffee were luxuries. And we made our own coffee at home. We didn't go down to Starbucks or the local coffee shop and purchase it for .50 a cup.

      We bought flour, baking soda, baking powder, and yeast. We made our own bread (french bread is simply flour, yeast and water - with a pinch of salt) instead of purchasing. It cuts the cost of bread from .50 a loaf to well under a dollar. Biscuits were home made, not from a Pillsbury refrigerated can.

      The motto was:

      Use it up;
      Wear it out.
      Make it do
      Or do without.

      We remade old clothes into new garments. Cooking, sewing and crafting were expected skills, and we used them often.

      My mother made her good suit by cutting down a suit of her older brother. While the seat of his pants and the cuffs of the coat were frayed and threadbare, there was enough good material in the legs of his trousers to make her skirt. And when she re-cut the coat, the worn edges of the sleeves and collar were cut off.

      When I was a teenager one of my best dresses was made from a worn out housecoat. And before I started high school, I made my own wardrobe. It included pleated skirts, a circular skirt, several blouses, and a corduroy jumper.

      Quilts were not a luxury item. They were the result of a need for bed covers. They were patches and pieces of fabric from used garments. No one would have thought of buying new fabric for quilt-making.

      Gardening produced most of our food. During WWII they were called Victory Gardens. Basic vegetables can be produced in window boxes or patio planters. Tomatoes, potatoes, and green beans can see you through a winter if you preserve them. And every good wife knew canning and preserving techniques. Those skills are not lost - and are as valuable today as they were then.

      Entertainment was checking books out of the library and reading. We didn't go to movies. There were no arcades. And there were no malls to tempt us to shop til we dropped.

      In lean times, you rethink your expenditures and figure ways to make additional money.

      No job is beneath your dignity if you can do it honestly and it pays the bills. I have been a teacher and a bed-pan carrier. I have scrubbed toilets, mowed lawns, walked dogs, and edited books.

      If you are in college, you might consider finding part time work. When I was finishing my last two years in college, I found janitorial work that let me clean offices after normal working hours. It let me use my school days for class and evenings for work and homework.

      If you don't think you can do justice to your class work with an outside job, you might want to consider reducing the number of class hours you take during a semester. It will take you longer to get your degree, but if you can complete your education without going into debt for it, you will be much better off.

      The solution to a recession is work, not worry. Fretting just expends energy. Work accomplishes.

      I wish you well.

  49. QUESTION:
    What are the best products to use for a dog who is allergic to flea powder?

    • ANSWER:
      This is the all natural way to keep pest off of your dog or cat

      Mix some Brewers Yeast (health food store i.e. Whole Foods Market) and garlic powder (any kind is okay ) and sprinkle it on your pet's food. I promise that this works and it is completely safe and the natural way to keep pest off of your pet. If they don't eat it at first just leave it there and don't change eventually they will eat it ( they will get hungry sooner or later) and you and your pet will not have a pest problem and you won't have to poison them with those chemicals.

      It cam down to where my 2 dogs and my cat won't eat their food without the mixture on their food. Hope everything work out well.


dog food without yeast