Tag Archives: treatment for yeast infection on dogs skin

Treatment For Yeast Infection On Dogs Skin

Yeast infections are horrible things that can seriously affect your health if you can't put a stop to them coming back time and again. But you don't need to use drug-based meds with their nasty side effects and cost. Here, you'll discover 3 yeast infection home remedies that will help you beat your infection fast and naturally.You may have heard that yeast infections are caused by a yeast-like fungus called Candida albicans which exists in our bodies quite naturally. You'll maybe also know that they are normally prevented from causing us any problems because our body's good bacteria keeps the fungus under control to stop it from overgrowing into an infection.But you may not be aware that the underlying, or root causes are the things that can negatively affect your body's friendly bacteria and help the Candida to grow and spread. The main issues are; reduction in friendly bacteria numbers, high blood-sugar levels, some drug therapy, hormonal imbalances, lowered immune system, and body pH imbalance. Typical triggers for these are; antibiotics overuse, diet, pregnancy, ill-health, stress, obesity, lifestyle issues, contraception, etc.No doubt you are using, or have used, everyday mainstream treatments of creams, pessaries, gels, sprays, foams, etc. And like many people you may have noticed that your symptoms can vanish over a period of time, but that they come back again, and for many people, time and time again. This is because these treatments are drug-based and really only address the symptoms of infections, not the root cause(s). And the Candida fungus can build-up a resistance to the drugs over time.That's why so many more sufferers nowadays are realizing the benefits of using natural yeast infection home remedies. In the main, these don't have the nasty side effects of drug-based therapies so they are generally safer, and they are much cheaper too. Here are 3 of the most popular home remedies for yeast out there...1. Garlic is an ancient home remedy for many things. And it is particularly favorable for yeast infections because of its natural antifungal properties. Eating garlic everyday will help attack the Candida in your gut. For the local symptoms crush a peeled clove of garlic into a smooth paste and apply over the area.2. Apple cider vinegar is another ancient home remedy that works for yeast infections, this time by rebalancing your body pH which can help to prevent fungal growth. Add 3 teaspoons to a glass of water and drink three times a day to battle the Candida in your gut. Douche the affected area with a mixture of 2 tablespoons of cider in 2 quarts of warm water. But it has to be raw, un-distilled, unpasteurized apple cider vinegar.3. Plain, unsweetened, natural yogurt with no fruit or coloring, and containing live, active cultures -- Lactobacillus Acidophilus (good bacteria) -- is another effective natural home remedy for yeast infection. Eat yogurt everyday to help build up your good bacteria in the gut. And apply to the local infection too. You can even dip a tampon in it and leave in overnight.These are 3 top yeast infection home remedies that you can start on right away. But, as you saw above, there are many underlying issues that you need to consider and address in order to truly crush your yeast infection, and prevent recurring infections from damaging your health and you social life. See below...

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    Any home remedies to treat yeast infections in dogs?
    My dog has a yeast infection of the skin. I cant take her to a vet right now bc I live about 2 hours away from the nearest one and money is tight right now. Im kind of at my wits end and I was wondering if any over the counter products work, like Vagisil. Ive seen many things online in research on what to try, but its so overwhelming. Any help would be appreciated.

    • ANSWER:
      There is an easy fix for a skin yeast infection. The smell can be reduced almost overnight with a solution of hydrogen peroxide and borax.

      To prepare the solution, add one tablespoon of borax to one liter of 1% hydrogen peroxide, mix well and spray on the dog all over. Make sure that the entire skin is in contact with the solution. Do not rinse and let dry. This solution should be applied everyday for a week. Most if not all of the smell should be gone by the second week.

      Borax is a non-toxic anti-fungal compound which will help in eradicating the yeast infection. Borax is a natural mineral that has a wide variety of uses. It is a component of many cosmetics, used as a food preservative, detergents, enamel glazes, etc.

      CAUTION: Make sure that you use Borax, NOT Boric Acid which is toxic. Borax is non-toxic and can be found in the laundry aisle at most major discount stores and grocery stores and it is very inexpensive.

      Good luck.

      Note:

      Never alow your vet to prescribe Prednisone or any other steroid to your dog. Just like in humans, steroids will cause more harm than good.Vets can be very irresponsible when it comes to the prescription of steroids because they are well aware of steroid side effects.

      As Dr. Karen Becker, DVM states - "Steroids (also called prednisone, cortisone or the nondescript “allergy shot”) are the least optimal treatment choice, as they work by suppressing your pet’s immune system. Not only can steroids have a negative effect on your pet’s liver, adrenal glands and kidneys, but suppressing your pet’s immune system with steroids also allows for opportunistic yeast and bacteria to grow on your pet’s skin, sometimes increasing the chances that antibiotics may be prescribed."

      Please read 'Steroids The Great Pretender - Even Low Steroid Doses Can Be Trouble'.

      http://www.shirleys-wellness-cafe.com/steroids.htm

  2. QUESTION:
    What are the symptoms of a dogs' yeast infection?
    My dog has this awful smell and we looked it up online. We saw that it was very common for the type of dog we have to get yeast infections, but we aren't sure if that's what he has. He seems to show the symptoms for it. He is also very old.

    • ANSWER:
      Depends on the location. It usually causes redness, dark brownish-red discharge in the ears. On the skin, it prefers warm places, like the arm pit or groin area, but can affect anywhere. The skin gets red, irritated and itchy ( of course!), and has a sweet odor. With chronic infections, the skin will darken, and get thick, like elephant skin.

      The easiest way to tell is to have your vet look at a swab of the skin/ears, to see if there is any yeast. There are many treatments, most topical unless the condition is severe. Please go to the vet, for his comfort.

  3. QUESTION:
    Does my dog have a yeast infection?
    I have a pitbull she is 1 1/2 years old. She never licks herself. Last two days she has been licking constantly and she like smacks her lips after like shes still licking but isnt, like something is on her tongue. Is this a yeast infection? any home remedies for dogs?

    • ANSWER:
      i think so. especially if she is licking constantly. here is something that may help. Ways to Control Yeast / Fungus Overgrowth
      Treatment: External Problems

      Bathe: Use a sulfur-based or medicated shampoo for fungus, one with Ketoconazole - KetoChlor Shampoo by VirBac - have your vet order it for you.

      Then use a Baking Soda rinse after shampooing, it will be quite helpful with the overall itchiness, skin problems and inflammation.

      BAKING SODA RINSE RECIPE
      Mix two (2) teaspoons of BAKING SODA per gallon of warm water; make sure to mix it so it completely dissolves - poor over pet, do not rinse off.

      After bathing and animal is dry: Prepare a 2 % solution of Oxy-Drops (Mix 1 teaspoon with 1 cup (8ozs.) of distilled water). Use this to spray or wipe skin, ears, and feet with to prevent secondary bacterial infection. (order below). Some people report wiping areas with Listerine stops itching.

  4. QUESTION:
    Anyone who had any personal experience with these dog diseases?
    I wondered if anyone can share some personal experience of these dog diseases. Like symptons, treatment and just anything important like what happened with the dog, did it survive, did it better fast or worse fast etc?
    Here they area:
    Skin Fold Dermatits
    Pyoderma
    Ringworm
    Abscess
    Allergies
    Skin Cancer
    Hot Spots
    Folliculitis
    and
    Yeast infection of the skin

    I wanna know exactly what the differences between them are like how you would differentiate pyoderma from hot spots etc.

    • ANSWER:
      Infections of the skin (pyoderma, skin fold dermatitis, folliculitis, and yeast) generally appear as rashes:
      Pyoderma and folliculits appear as groups of reddened spots, and can look like a really bad case of acne.
      Skin fold dermatitis appears, as you may have guessed, in the folds of the dog's skin, especially if the area is typically moist (i.e. around the muzzle), and may have red and irritated appearance.
      Yeast may be moist, red, and irritated, or flaky/yellow in appearance, and are best determined by your vet due to it wide variety of appearances.

      Ringworm is a fungus (which is CONTAGIOUS) that *typically* appears as round patches of hairless skin which may have some irritation underneath. The hair loss may not be perfectly round in some cases, and may be widespread on the dog. Sometimes (esp. in cats) it is not this obvious, an no hair loss is present.

      An abscess is an infection, and typically looks like a large angry and irritated pimple. If it is bad enough it may be accompanied by a fever. It may be dry, or it may weep pus.

      Allergies may cause any number of skin conditions, but the most typical is itching of the rump, abdomen, and feet.

      Hot spots look like wet, reddened, irritated areas of skin, typically with matted hair around the site and hair loss where the sore is present. It may scab over and re-open. They are painful and itchy, so the animal may have a hard time not rubbing on it (which will just irritate it more and slow the healing process).

      Skin cancer can take many many forms and is best discussed with your veterinarian if you suspect it. It is more common in dogs with light colored and less dense fur (think pale, light haired people on the beach with no sunscreen).

      The treatment for each will depend on how severe the problem is. Infections may require antibiotics. Allergies can be dealt with by finding their source (chicken? soy? dust mites? grass pollen?) and either eliminating it or giving allergy injections (just like some people get). Ringworm and yeast infections often require special medicated baths. Skin cancer may not be treatable.

      All of the conditions listed would need a veterinarian to properly diagnose and prescribe medications. They will get worse if you let them go, so it's best to have them addressed ASAP.

  5. QUESTION:
    what herbal or home treatments can i give my dogs for yeast infection?
    their ears are stuffed with brown to yellow yeast and there is no other bacteria found in them. i have bee going to the vet twice since and still they have it. though it went down greatly that their not so touchy. but i hate to go for the third time and pay another 140$ for they wont give resupplys until they check him. im hopping for herbal stuff besides vinager.

    • ANSWER:
      You've got a lot of good answers so far!
      I also wanted to mention that the food that you are feeding could be contributing to the problem though.

      There are so many grains and unnatural things in kibble dog food that can cause problems for them its unbelievable!
      Food sensitivities and allergies can cause a great deal of ongoing skin and ear problems for dogs!

      You might want to try switching over to a 'grain free' kibble and do ALOT of research on dog food and canine nutrition! You will be amazed at what you learn!

  6. QUESTION:
    Can supplementing a dog with omega fatty acids aggravate a Candida(or yeast) infection?
    My dog is recovering from what I belief to be a yeast infection(Vet wouldn't say.. She simply said "Secondary infection from flea allergies".) It is almost gone, but where it is/was, it was always super oily, not dry like most skin infections.. So I'm assuming supplementing an oily dog with oil would be bad, right? Just checking, because I've read about all the other benefits of giving dogs omega fatty acids.

    • ANSWER:

      Derm caps may actually help.
      Derm caps are a balance of omega 3 and 6 with vitamin e.
      Try a shampoo like hylyte 2 days after flea prevention treatment.
      Make sure to fully rinse the dog and brush.
      Brushing daily will help stimulate the oil glands to work properly.
      If oiliness continues I would try an anti seboreahic shampoo from the vet.

  7. QUESTION:
    Who honestly knows If vinegar and water works for chronic ear infections in dogs?
    Has anyone tried it? Is it effective? or is there any other natural remedies for ear infections in dogs. no antibiotics.

    • ANSWER:
      Ineffective. This summer alone, I've already treated over 50 ear infections. Tis the season, is our motto. Ear infections, skin infections, in high numbers usually due to more water exposure, humidity, trapped moisture, and allergens.

      Your vet treatment team and your dog would really appreciate if you don't try vinegar and water at home, it fails, then you have a stinky dog, with infected ears, at the clinic, in desperate need of a topical antifungal/antibioitic/anti-inflammatory med. Normal flora on the skin's surface should not be in ear canals. When yeast and bacteria infect the ear canal, usually it's due to water in the ear compromising the balance of yeast/bacteria populations or the dog started scratching due to allergies and got a secondary infection after breaking the skin and compromising the skin barrier, allowing bacteria and yeast to affect multiple skin layers in the ear.

      Antibiotics and antifungals help the ear go back to normal state with only bacteria and yeast living on the exterior of the body. Ensuring it's being shaken before use, enough med is being administered into the ear canals, then massaging at the base of the ear, are all important to ensure the med is effective.

      For maintenance, cleansing the ears with a cerulytic (breaks up wax/debris) cleanser with a drying agent can help prevent ear infections with weekly use and whenever exposed to water, not to exceed every 2-3 days. If a dog swims daily, cleansing their ears every 3 days will reduce their risk for ear infections.

      And definitely don't immerse a dog in vinegar, diluted or not. They are so hypersensitive to odor and it does not benefit skin that is already symptomatic for infection, sebhorrea, itchiness, or fleas.

      Meds such as Mometamax, Easotic, Genotic/Betagen/other gentamicin based meds, or Posatex are effective against yeast and bacteria, and may be prescribed by your vet. You cannot avoid Rx med if your dog has an ear infection. He will continue to have inflamed ears, with trapped moisture, excess debris, itchiness, and possibly develop internal ear damage and destruction if left untreated. Do not take it too lightly! Hope you're just randomly asking about vinegar, and you don't have a dog with an ear infection...

  8. QUESTION:
    Our dog stinks really bad! What could the odor be and what do I do to get rid of it?
    We have a Shi Tsu and recently got another Shi Tsu. Ever since the new dog came we have this horrible odor coming from both dogs. Help! We are gagging!
    I appreciate the advice telling me to give our dogs a bath. If I was that stupid, I probably couldn't work the computer.

    • ANSWER:
      take them to the vet. really! if they smell that bad then something is wrong. It could be that one has a dental problem and spreads that "infection smell" when they lick themselves or they could have a bacterial infection on the skin, yeast infection in the ears or yeast infection of the skin. I had a cocker that got yeast infections on the skin and the infections were caused by thyroid problems. Please do not waste your time and money on worthless shampoos and treatments from any store. Take the dogs to the vet and find out the specific cause so you can get the right treatment.

  9. QUESTION:
    What kinda of ear infection does my DOG have?
    i realized a month ago that my floppy ear malti poo has a very dry and flakey ear. Just the one.
    its slightly red and seems like it really itches her. theres no discharge or foul smell. is a yeast infection? or something else?

    • ANSWER:
      It definitely sounds like a problem, but without more information it's impossible to tell you exactly what it is. It could be a chronic condition like eczema, or it could be an infection, or it could be simply dry skin. Only a qualified veterinarian can tell you for sure. Only a proper diagnosis will lead to an effective treatment. Call your vet and have your dog seen as soon as possible.

      Drs. Foster & Smith have a pet education section that has a lot of information you might find useful. Check out this page: http://www.peteducation.com/article.cfm?c=2+2111&aid=427

  10. QUESTION:
    How do I know if my dog has ear mites?
    My dog has a red little bump on his ear (like if a mosquito bite). Does anyone know what it has?

    • ANSWER:
      Cat and Dog Ear Mites
      Signs & symptoms · Diagnosis · Treatment · Related articles
      What Are Ear Mites?
      Ear mites medical terms: cerumen, otodectes, notoedres, demodex, malassezia yeast, staphylococcus bacteria, streptococcus bacteria, pruritus
      Ear mites in dogs and ear mites in cats are tiny little creatures rather like spiders. They have 8 legs and live on or just under the surface of the skin. The two species of mites that cause ear infections are Otodectes and Notoedres. Otodectes infect dogs, cats, foxes and ferrets. Notoedres infect cats—usually the body and sometimes the ear. A common mite that causes skin infection and may involve areas of the head around the ears is demodex. While demodex causes skin infections around the ear, it does not cause infections in the ear canal.

      Who gets ear mites?
      Ear mites usually infect young pets, especially pets in shelters, and abandoned puppies and kittens. Older pets are somewhat resistant to mites. If the pet’s ear mites infect humans, the mite dies within a couple weeks because humans are not their natural host.

  11. QUESTION:
    Do dogs get yeast infection? How can it be homeopathically cleared?
    Female dog had spay surgery and had antibiotics, and has had a bad odor since.

    • ANSWER:
      Dogs get both urinary yeast infections and yeast infections in the skin...the skin infections have the foul odor. I had a Boxer for 14 years that had skin yeast problems all her life..caused by allergies, and by thyroid problems. She was 7 before we discovered the thyroid problem and thus we treated her with dips, cortisone shots, and gave her ketoconizole as a maintenance medication to combat the yeast. When we got her on thyroid meds, that, along with the ketoconizole, pretty well kept it in check..
      I guess what I'm saying is, there is no effective homeopathic treatment for yeast infection. Let your vet evaluate the dog and choose a regimen of treatment for her. Could be temporary, could be chronic...Good Luck1

      Papaw

  12. QUESTION:
    What is the best treatment for my chocolate labrador?
    He gets repeated ear infections in one ear and the vet keeps giving him anti biotics. He had skin disorders and the vets didn't know what to do about this ...but a man walking his lab told us to give a daily fish oil tablet...and his skin condition is cured. Maybe someone has used something that works for the ear infections?

    • ANSWER:
      due to labs having floppy ears they get allot of moister in their another thing is that with him having the skin problems it probably indicates he has allergies their is a couple things you can try
      cleanse the ear with a 50/50 mix of white vinegar and water The vinegar acts to break down the wax in the ear, and creates a pH in the ear which prohibits the growth of bacteria and yeast. If the dog already has the infection keep him on the oral anti biotics and use Ear Relief by Veterinarian's Best retailing for .99 at petsmart.com but if he does not have a infection right now use the vinegar regularly to prevent any from coming it worked really well in my dogs due to our climate and the fact that they love the water all of my dogs have gotten infections from time to time until i started using the vinger treatment it keeps them at bay I may only get one infection every now and then and mostly because i slack off on cleaning their ears out we have a border collie a sheltie a springer spaniel a Pekingese and a German Shepard any way good luck hope this helps . Amy

  13. QUESTION:
    What could my dogs excessive itching be?
    My dog is itching its bottom an awful lot lately and it's only at night. At first I thought it could be worms but then I figured out that two days ago I washed my dog and shampoo must have gotten there and after I had finished washing my dog it kept wiggleing it's but like crazy. Could it be the shampoo irritating it or is it worms
    ?

    • ANSWER:
      I see a few possible causes for the itching. Itching can be caused by an allergic reaction (to flea bites, the food or treats you give him, the grooming products or house-cleaning products you are using), mites or steroid use (also called prednisone, cortisone or the so-called 'allergy shot'). Scratching opens the door to secondary skin infections.

      ALLERGIES

      Many dogs are allergic to flea bites. You may not be able to see the fleas directly but you can always see the debris they leave behind that looks like finely ground coffee. If you see these and put them in water, they will turn red.

      You can get rid of the fleas on your dog with natural methods so that he is not exposed to the toxic chemicals of Frontline, Advantage and other popular flea medications which will harm him sooner or later. Check this link for recommendations http://www.wikihow.com/Get-Rid-of-Fleas-Naturally Also, you can dust your yard where he roams with inexpensive diatomaceous earth. For more info on its use to control fleas see http://www.care2.com/greenliving/all-around-non-toxic-flea-control.html and http://wolfcreekranch1.tripod.com/diatomaceous_earth_fleas.html

      Check the ingredients of the food/treats you give him. Dogs digestive system is not designed to handle grains well. If they contain grains such as wheat or corn stop them immediately. Get food/treats that have no grains and that have meat as a primary ingredient – chicken, lamb, salmon, etc.

      If you just introduced a new grooming product (or a house cleaning product), discontinue it immediately.

      MITES

      There are three types of mites that attack dogs most often: demodectic (not contagious and may itch or not), sarcoptic (very contagious and extremely itchy) and cheyletiella (contagious and mildly itchy). This condition is known as mange. The typical symptoms of mange as the condition progresses include hair loss and scaly or crusty skin.

      If the reason for the itching is mites, avoid the medications most often prescribed by vets that contain toxic chemicals that will harm your dog sooner or later. These are Ivermectin (also known as Ivomec) and Amitraz (also known as Mitaban). Instead, I recommend a natural, effective, easy to use, and inexpensive spray treatment that will kill the mites but is harmless to pets and humans. You can get it at http://www.florapetnaturals.com/online-store.html

      STEROID USE

      As Dr. Karen Becker, DVM states - "Steroids (also called prednisone, cortisone or the nondescript “allergy shot”) are the least optimal treatment choice, as they work by suppressing your pet’s immune system. Not only can steroids have a negative effect on your pet’s liver, adrenal glands and kidneys, but suppressing your pet’s immune system with steroids also allows for opportunistic yeast and bacteria to grow on your pet’s skin..." Please read the information below: 'Steroids The Great Pretender - Even Low Steroid Doses Can Be Trouble'.
      http://www.shirleys-wellness-cafe.com/steroids.htm

      Vets nowadays assume that pet owners just want to see their pets get better at all cost or if they are not sure about what the problem is they will prescribe steroids knowing the risks. Steroids are very dangerous and do not cure anything, they just mask the symptoms temporarily but the underlying cause remains.

      SKIN INFECTION REMEDY

      For any skin infection (bacterial or fungal) such as the ones commonly caused by the use of steroids like Prednisone, cortisone or the so called “allergy shot” or any secondary infections caused by flea bite allergy or mites, as well as cuts, scrapes, etc. I recommend a powder called 'Flowers of Sulfur' (also known as 'brimstone' or 'sublime sulfur').

      This substance has been used for thousands of years to cure all kinds of skin ailments and if there is itching, it will stop it very quickly. Google it to learn more about its healing properties.

      Even vets have forgotten about this wonderful and inexpensive remedy but fortunately you can still purchase it at your local pharmacy for very little money. You can also buy it online at http://www.pennherb.com/search?mp=s&se=Flowers+of+Sulphur+Powder

      Flowers of sulfur is safe to apply to your pet's skin but take care not to inhale sulfur powder.

      You can dust this powder on your dog's skin OR mix it with an oil to rub on the skin. I prefer the latter.

      The dusting can easily be accomplished if you use a powdered sugar duster or an empty talcum powder bottle. Separate the hair as you go around dusting to expose the skin until you have covered it.

      Alternatively, mix 2 tablespoons of flower of sulfur with 1 cup of Jojoba oil and put it in a bottle. Always shake to mix well before applying to the skin as it tends to separate. You do not need to wear gloves as it is not toxic to humans either.

  14. QUESTION:
    Can elephant skin on dogs be cured?
    Our dog has suffered from yeast infections for several years. After spending hundreds of dollars and going to the vet countless times, I have finally been able to get his itching under control. However, he now has bare patches of skin and thick, ugly skin that the vet says is "elephant skin". I don't need to know how to stop the itching. All I need to know is is there a way to get rid of the thick ugly skin or will he have that for the rest of his life? My vet has been able to provide any suggestions/treatments.

    • ANSWER:
      Talk to your vet about prescribing a systemic anti-fungal. My yeast infected dog is on ketoconizole. It does work quite well for her. Much of her elephant hide has started to become normal and the skin is growing hair. She also gets a fish oil capsule daily. and is fed a diet with very little grain. Make sure that your dog's thyroid is normal. In order for the elephant hide to be decreased, the yeast in the skin has to be killed and prevented from coming back. Liver issues can be a problem when using ketoconizole so blood work needs to be run often to check for that potential side effect.

  15. QUESTION:
    How do you treat a Pit Bull with sensative skin?
    Boland is 2 years old and white. He has very sensative skin. Can anyone recommend treatment for his itching. I am giving him an allergy pill in the am. and a Benydril at night.

    • ANSWER:
      The only treatment for allergies is avoidance of the allergen. So you have to figure out what's causing his allergies. Probably be best to take him to the vet. If your vet can't give you some helpful feedback and guidance (not just prescribing steroids), ask to be referred to a veterinary dermatologist. Go to the American College of Veterinary Dermatology site to find a dermatologist in your area:
      http://www.acvd.org/

      My white boxer also has allergies and very sensitive skin. Right now we're fighting a yeast infection that seems to be secondary to her allergies, from all the licking and scratching she does. Make sure your dog hasn't developed an infection. If he has, that will need attention in addition to controlling his allergies. Try your best to keep him from further irritating his skin.

      These are just a few common allergens that dogs can be sensitive to:
      * Trees
      * Grass
      * Weed pollens
      * Fabrics such as wool or nylon
      * Rubber and plastic materials
      * Foods and food additives such as individual meats, grains, or colorings
      * Milk products
      * House dust and dust mites
      * Flea bites

      So... make sure he's eating a decent quality kibble, wash his bedding in HOT water, wipe his feet/stomach/whatever when he comes in from outside, only use stainless steel bowls for his food and water, keep him on a good flea preventative, and bathe him often (yes, that's right) to keep the allergens that he picks to a minimum. Make sure it's a mild shampoo that doesn't irritate him, and always be sure that it's thoroughly rinsed out.

      Here are some articles on dog allergies and the various causes of itching. Lots of info, but most definitely worth your while.
      http://www.peteducation.com/article.cfm?c=2+2082&aid=503
      http://www.thepetcenter.com/gen/itch.html
      http://www.peteducation.com/category.cfm?c=2+2082

  16. QUESTION:
    What can I do about dog losing hair on tail?
    My 7 year old Chihuahua keeps biting the hair from her tail and backside. I keep taking her to the vet and I've gotten answers from allergies to impacted anal glands to yeast infections to heredity but no consistent relief for her yet. The last time he didn't even send antibiotics home for her (she bites and makes sores on her skin), but gave her the routine shot in the office and some prescription shampoo and leave on conditioner. Well now her tail has bloody sores all over it again. She's been spayed and is on flea treatment so I can rule those two issues out. Her mother and sister did had similar problems so I do wonder if it's hereditary. Anyone else have any experience with this? I know it hurts/aggravates her and she looks pitiful. Even if it is just bad genes shouldn't there be something to help her?

    • ANSWER:
      Have you tried spraying her tail with something that tastes bad. I saw some stuff at Petsmart. I think it was yuk or something like that. It said that it did not sting but was made to stop the chewing of sores. However if this is compulsive, she might still do it anyway. But if you can get it to heal that might help relieve it. It is worth a shot if you haven't tried it already. You would still need to find the root cause though.

  17. QUESTION:
    how to get rid of itchy skin on our dog?
    our dog which is 8 has always had skin problems she has been to different vets and they have tried numerous things including cortisone shots. she gets like dandruff and her hair falls out and she really smells no matter how many baths she gets. any ideas out there?
    the skin around where the hair is falling out is brown and scaly.

    • ANSWER:
      Have you considered she has food allergies?
      2 of my dogs had dry skin and problems with their fur - I switched them all to Canidae chicken and rice from Science Diet, which is mostly corn meal and artificial preservatives.
      In the year and a half they are on Canidae, they have nomore skin issues.

      The bad smell would indicate a yeast or fungus infection - your vet doesn't know that? Miconyzol (what is used for vaginal infections in humans) applied twice a day to the problem areas and washing twice a week with a good dandruff shampoo heals the fungus - and better food keeps it from coming back. Your vet should have some ideas as to treatment - this is what my vet advised, and it worked beautifully for my dogs.

  18. QUESTION:
    My dog smells like stinky cheese real bad and it is starting to make me sick, any ideas what causes it?
    Does anyone know treatments for such a thing. The skin is really red and she itches a lot and her hair is starting to thin out.

    • ANSWER:
      Sounds to me like a yeast infection. But there are soooo many different kind of skin disorders. Mange, yeast, bacterial.

      I would say yeast.

      Depending on the breed of dog and where you live in the world, yeast can be a pretty bad problem for dogs. Not to mention for people who have to live with the smell haha.

      I would definitly say, take the doggie to the doctor. They may decide to do a skin scraping, if it is called for. But most likely they'll send you on your way with some cephlexin, maybe keto, and some special shampoo to help get the yeast off of the skin and promote healing while the anti-biotics work their magic!

  19. QUESTION:
    How to stop my dog from itching?
    I have a jack russell x shih tzu in auckland, nz who is a year and a half and she has a skin condition where she is always itching. i have taken her to the vets a few times and given her steroids, medicated shampoo and other tablets to try and help her but shes still itching. i dont want to keep giving her different drugs because i dont think it is healthy for her. What else cud i do to help her stop itching?

    • ANSWER:
      Oh no...it is bad news that your dog has been treated with seroids. Never, ever give steroids to your dog again. If you do, you are setting yourself up for a long time of misery and huge health problems for your dog, including chronic skin issues.

      I guess many vets nowadays assume that pet owners just want to see their pets get better above all else and if they are not sure about what the problem is they will prescribe steroids knowing the risks.

      Steroids do not cure anything, they just mask the symptoms temporarily but the underlying cause remains.

      As Dr. Karen Becker, DVM states - "Steroids (also called prednisone, cortisone or the nondescript “allergy shot”) are the least optimal treatment choice, as they work by suppressing your pet’s immune system. Not only can steroids have a negative effect on your pet’s liver, adrenal glands and kidneys, but suppressing your pet’s immune system with steroids also allows for opportunistic yeast and bacteria to grow on your pet’s skin..." Please read the information below: 'Steroids The Great Pretender - Even Low Steroid Doses Can Be Trouble'.
      http://www.shirleys-wellness-cafe.com/steroids.htm

      For your dog's skin issues I recommend a powder called 'Flowers of Sulfur' (also known as 'brimstone' or 'sublime sulfur'). This substance has been used for thousands of years to cure all kinds of skin ailments and if there is itching, it will stop it very quickly. Among many other uses, it has been effectively used as a remedy for bacterial and fungal infections. Google it to learn more about its healing properties.

      Even vets have forgotten about this wonderful and inexpensive remedy but fortunately you can still purchase it at your local pharmacy for very little money.

      Flowers of sulfur is safe to apply to your pet's skin but take care not to inhale sulfur powder.

      You can dust this powder on your dog's skin OR mix it with an oil to rub on the skin. I prefer the latter.

      The dusting can easily be accomplished if you use a powdered sugar duster or an empty talcum powder bottle. Separate the hair as you go around dusting to expose the skin until you have covered it.

      Alternatively, mix 2 tablespoons of flower of sulfur with 1 cup of Jojoba oil and put it in a bottle. Always shake to mix well before applying to the skin as it tends to separate. You do not need to wear gloves as it is not toxic to humans either.

  20. QUESTION:
    Treatment for dog swollen ears and losing hair?
    My dog use to hide under the bed and dark places. Now maybe of mosquito bite or using excess dry shampoo, she is suffering from swollen ears and losing hair.

    I would like to know what treatment I should give my dog. Thanks...:)

    Kimi.

    • ANSWER:
      It sounds more like a yeast infection than anything else. But you should get the vet to rule out a bacterial infection.

      Is she scratching, have red eyes or getting thickened skin where she is losing hair? These can be sure sign of yeast.

      This can be really hard to get rid of in the long term, One thing to try is 1 part apple cider vinegar mixed with 3 parts water. Use this to clean her ears and wash down with after a bath or in her itchy spots. Continue the ear drops daily for at least two weeks and then use twice a week after that.

      Another thing that seems to work well is a product called Zymox. I'm in Australia and had to order mine from the US but it seems to be working really well.

      One of the best things you can do to help prevent yeast issues is to not feed your dog any grains or high carb vegetables. This is harder than it sounds as most commercial foods use these as fillers. My dogs don't get any commercial food at all; I feed then a carnivore diet of meat, meaty bones and organs.

  21. QUESTION:
    Is there a connection between a dogs dental condition and returning ear infections?

    My dog is on a prescribed diet of Urinary SO, made by Royal Canin.

    • ANSWER:
      Almost always these problems are diet-related. Your dog is showing signs of a weakened immune system, which is manefesting in allergies. Most of the grains in dog food are not digestible for dogs, are allergens and cause tartar build-up on teeth (humans, too). Most of the immune system is located in the GI tract, where nutrients are absorbed (seen the DanActive commercial?). When you screw up its workings with non-nutritive dog "food" you see all kinds of problems, like ear and skin problems, gas, GI upset, etc. What I mean, are the filler ingredients you see in most commercial dog foods. These include corn products, wheat products, soy products, peanut hulls, sugar, colors, flavors, salt, beet pulp... I could go on, but I won't. You see many of these non-food ingredients in well-known, vet-recommended prescription foods, too. Why are those ingredients in dog food: they're cheap. CHEAP=CRAP.

      My diet of preference, that rises far above any other is raw. Although domesticated for thousands of years, a dog's gut still works the same as the wolf. They have the acids, enzymes and flora that are designed to digest raw meat and bones. What they don't have are the enzymes to digest grains (wheat, corn, etc). A balanced raw diet will cure most, if not all of your dog's problems. My dogs have sparkling white teeth, because the enzymes in the raw meat actually clean their teeth. Also, I live in FL where we have a flea problem year round. In my house there are 7 cats and 3 dogs, non of which need treatment for fleas. They don't need any chemicals because they are so healthy, they repel fleas on their own. When I think how expensive raw diet is, I just think of how much I save on flea prevention and treatment. For info:
      http://www.auntjeni.com
      http://www.drpitcairn.com

      If you really have trouble with raw, here are some other suggestions. It's a cut and paste from another question that I answered some time ago:

      Sometimes a meat and rice recipe will work, but some of the problems that you're having will respond better to a high-quality grain-free diet. All kibble, which is cheaper than canned or raw, must have grain, potato, or tapioca in it to hold it together. Potato would be cheaper than tapioca, and potato is better than grain.

      HIgh-quality means that most of the ingredients are of HUMAN-GRADE quality. None of the recall products were human-grade. If it's not good enough for me, it's not good enough for my dogs.

      The first ingredient should be a meat. It shouldn't be a meat by-product or a meal. Neither of these are human grade, nor can they be measured for there nutritional content. That's because the company cooks down a bunch of different animal parts that's different each time.

      Don't get anything with wheat, corn, soy (or soybean oil), BHA, BHT, ethoxoquin, artificial flavors and colors, salt, sugars (including sucrose and fructose).

      A lot of these poor-quality ingredients are cheap fillers, flavor enhancers, and preservatives. They offer a low source of nutrition, and weaken the immune system. That's what causes allergies. The only reason they're in the recipe is because they serve a purpose for the company, not to keep your dog healthy.

      I suggest you read dog food labels carefully. Look at foods like Evo (made by Innova), Timberwolf Wild & Natural or Ocean Blue, Barking At The Moon (made by Solid Gold). They're more expensive, but they would seriously cut down on the allergies, which would mean less trips to the vet. I also suggest adding a cold-water fish oil, like salmon, krill, anchovy or sardine. This will help a lot with the ear problem and the yeast. You could also add probiotics and dygestive enzymes.
      One product that has salmon oil, pre- and probiotcs, and digestive enzymes is Positive Health by Great Life. They also make an excellent food, but is expensive. Their website http://www.greatlife4pets.com

  22. QUESTION:
    Anyone have experience with yeast infection in dogs?
    My puppy was diagnosed with demodectic (red) mange a couple of months ago. After treatment some of the patches are gone, but she still has a big one on her body which hasn`t changed at all the last weeks. The skin is darkened, but there is no smell and she doesn`t scratch it. She also has some small hairless spots on her leggs, which do seem to itch! I`m wondering if it`s not only red mange. Could this be yeast infection?

    • ANSWER:
      It COULD be yeast, or it could be a bacterial infection, or it could be an allergic response. It could be a different type of mite in addition to the Demodex (such as Sarcoptes or Cheyletiella mites). These mites don't respond to the treatment used for Demodex-- they respond to a different medicine. It could possibly even be a fungal infection (such as ringworm). Or it could be a combination of problems. Also, it can take a LONG time for hair to grow back after Demodex treatment.

      Skin problems have many different causes, and it's impossible to say what's happening without a vet exam and possibly some testing. If I were you, I would have her re-checked... possibly even a referral to a veterinary dermatologist if appropriate.

  23. QUESTION:
    My dog keeps getting sleeps arround his eyes, and then he's left with mildly bleeding sores. Any remedies?

    I don't have enough money right now to take him to the vet. Any home remedies?

    • ANSWER:
      Most likely it is a yeast infection. Colloidal silver is a alternative to traditional antibiotics. You can buy it at a health food grocery store like Bashas or Sun Harvest.

      It tastes just like distilled water and can be ingested or applied to the skin, in the eyes, nose, or ears, or any other body part that requires treatment. Treat a couple of times a day by placing a drop or two directly in the eye and also use a cotton ball or Q-tip saturated to clean off the eye goobers twice daily. It is completely harmless to the eye and will not burn the eye or the open sores.

  24. QUESTION:
    Can't get rid of yeast infection in my dog's ears?
    I have a black lab/border collie mix, he constantly has infection in his ears, I clean them use the medicine and wash and have had them flushed twice which can get expensive. The vet said it is common in this type of dog and it could be allergy too, which I think so because he has really itchy dry skin on his back. I just don't know what to do to help him, should I change his food? I have been to two vets they both just say to give benedryl. But it doesn't really work, and I feel bad for him scratching at himself all the time.
    The ear medication I used was called Mometemax drops and also used a cream, I cant remember the name but it was in a pale green tube. Also use Oti Calm cleansing solution.

    • ANSWER:
      Ask your vet to try him on a 3 week course of Ketoconazole ( oral anti - fungal) It's expensive,but it works wonders.Also,have you tried pulling his ears back? Use a men's tube sock,cut the end off and slip it over his head ( you may have to secure it with some athletic tape) This will get the air circulating in his ears and help to kill the yeast.Feed him yogurt (plain,unsweetened) everyday,and add at least 2000 mg. of salmon oil to his food every day. Benedryl may stop the itching,but it doesn't kill the yeast.May I ask what ear medication you use?

      Hmmm...Has the vet cultured the discharge from the ears? Perhaps a different antifungal agent is needed.You may also try a rinse of 1/3 white vinegar,1/3 witch hazel and 1/3 dostilled water,in addition to the sock/headband treatment.Have you ever used Panalog? It seems to do the trick,or ,you could even try Monistat ( yes,for vaginal yeast infections.) Clean the ears with the vinegar/witch hazel solution,let dry well,and massage a little of the Monistat cream into the ear canal.It won't hurt the dog;I did a search;here are a few links for you.
      http://animalpetdoctor.homestead.com/Ears.html
      http://www.bellaonline.com/articles/art29091.asp
      http://www.vetinfo4dogs.com/dogear.html
      http://www.dermapet.com/articles/moeet.html

      Good luck in treating this frustrating problem.

  25. QUESTION:
    How can i make my dog smell good after taking her a shower?
    Every time i shower my chihuahua,she always smells bad, even with really smelly shampoos.
    what can i do to make her smell goooooooooooooood?
    Please Help! :)
    That i could make at home!!!

    • ANSWER:
      She may be sensitive, or even allerigic, to ingredients/fragrances in the shampoos.

      Also, if the odor is returning that quickly, it may be a type of yeast infection on her skin which is quite common in some dogs. A veterinarian can check for this and prescribe a treatment that will help quickly.

      Good luck - I hope Stinkerbell smells better soon!

  26. QUESTION:
    why does my dog suddenly have an odor problem?
    my dog is 7 years old and has developed a strong odour. What could be causing this?

    • ANSWER:
      Could be dental/gum problems...Could be a skin yeast infection called Malaysia - Treatable with antibiotics, or thyroid meds, or with allergy meds...Whatever the cause, your vet should make the diagnosis and determine the regimen for treatment

  27. QUESTION:
    I have a shorty jack russell, he itches all the time, can anyone help me. We have had him on steroides, & oth?
    We have also changed dog foods, no corn, wheat or soy products, only dry dog food with meat.
    The steroids were for the itching. We have taken him to 3 vets no help, they want to draw blood to try to find a disease. He is on antihistamines right now, not helping. No fleas sorry. Any other suggestions?

    • ANSWER:
      Your dog could be allergic to you LOL LOL or the environment my dachshund (male 7 yrs old ) is allergic to grass not a joke he has cost me several trips to the vet and around 1000,00 bucks to discover he can;t be in fresh cut grass or for a few hours after something in the type grass we have just tears the dog up & he scratches like crazy all the time.I have a special shampoo I use from his vet. Now your dog may be allergic to something in your home yard or garden it may not be his food can get your vet to do some tests to see what if any thing he is allergic to then again it may be he is over ridden with fleas if you live in an area with flea populations.Such as the south. Have you ruled out plain old dry skin ?? Some shampoos that are used on pets do dry the skin out.

      Pruritus:::::(could be)
      A chemical reaction that occur in the skin & stimulates the nerves causing the itch factor the act of scratching may stimulate these inflammatory reactions in the skin & make it all worseANY skin condition that causes inflammation can acuse pruritus!!!!This is also associated with other skin diseases secondary bacterial skin infections (pyocerma) also may have secondary yeast infection. The main skin condition are allergies & skin parasites ask your vet to do diagnostic tests, or may have to do some blood work to find the under luing condition.Have your vet do
      1)Complete & through medical history on your dog
      2) A through physical examination
      3) Do a skin scraping to rule out mange, mites, or other parasites
      4)Do a fungle culture of the hair to rule out dermatophytes (ringworm)
      Antihistamines, supplements, shampoos and corticosteroids ALL temporary relief for this dog.
      Flea allergy is the Most common in the USA.
      Insect allergies, scabies, cheyletiella mites, and lice are also some commen reasons for itchy skin in animals.
      To best help this dog (your buddy) is to find the under lying cause.
      This is a frustrating problem with so many causes treatments are the same alot to tryIts extremely important you keep in close communications with your vet(s)
      Here is what I buy for my dog
      Sulf Oxy Dex shampoo
      12 fl oz can ask your vet for this good Luck

  28. QUESTION:
    Why does my dog lick his paws and scratch himself?
    Hes on flea medicine. He has been all summer, so its def no fleas. Theres no visible signs of bugs or anything like that. Its getting so bad that he keeps me up at night. Should i change his food? Maybe allergies?

    • ANSWER:
      I see a few possible causes for the itching. Itching can be caused by an allergic reaction (to flea bites, the food or treats you give him, the grooming products or house-cleaning products you are using), mites or steroid use (also called prednisone, cortisone or the so-called 'allergy shot'). Scratching opens the door to secondary skin infections.

      ALLERGIES

      Many dogs are allergic to flea bites so even one flea on an allergic dog may cause a lot of havoc. You may not be able to see the fleas directly but you can always see the debris they leave behind that looks like finely ground coffee. If you see these and put them in water, they will turn red.

      You can get rid of the fleas on your dog with natural methods so that he is not exposed to the toxic chemicals of Frontline, Advantage and other popular flea medications which will harm him sooner or later. Check this link for recommendations http://www.wikihow.com/Get-Rid-of-Fleas-Naturally Also, you can dust your yard where he roams with inexpensive diatomaceous earth. For more info on its use to control fleas see http://www.care2.com/greenliving/all-around-non-toxic-flea-control.html and http://wolfcreekranch1.tripod.com/diatomaceous_earth_fleas.html

      Check the ingredients of the food/treats you give him. Dogs digestive system is not designed to handle grains well. If they contain grains such as wheat or corn stop them immediately. Get food/treats that have no grains and that have meat as a primary ingredient – chicken, lamb, salmon, etc.

      If you just introduced a new grooming product (or a house cleaning product), discontinue it immediately.

      MITES

      There are three types of mites that attack dogs most often: demodectic (not contagious and may itch or not), sarcoptic (very contagious and extremely itchy) and cheyletiella (contagious and mildly itchy). This condition is known as mange. The typical symptoms of mange as the condition progresses include hair loss and scaly or crusty skin.

      If the reason for the itching is mites, avoid the medications most often prescribed by vets that contain toxic chemicals that will harm your dog sooner or later. These are Ivermectin (also known as Ivomec) and Amitraz (also known as Mitaban). Instead, I recommend a natural, effective, easy to use, and inexpensive spray treatment that will kill the mites but is harmless to pets and humans. You can get it at http://www.florapetnaturals.com/online-store.html

      STEROID USE

      As Dr. Karen Becker, DVM states - "Steroids (also called prednisone, cortisone or the nondescript “allergy shot”) are the least optimal treatment choice, as they work by suppressing your pet’s immune system. Not only can steroids have a negative effect on your pet’s liver, adrenal glands and kidneys, but suppressing your pet’s immune system with steroids also allows for opportunistic yeast and bacteria to grow on your pet’s skin..." Please read the information below: 'Steroids The Great Pretender - Even Low Steroid Doses Can Be Trouble'.
      http://www.shirleys-wellness-cafe.com/steroids.htm

      Vets nowadays assume that pet owners just want to see their pets get better at all cost or if they are not sure about what the problem is they will prescribe steroids knowing the risks. Steroids are very dangerous and do not cure anything, they just mask the symptoms temporarily but the underlying cause remains.

      SKIN INFECTION AND ITCHING REMEDY

      For any skin infection (bacterial or fungal) such as the ones commonly caused by the use of steroids like Prednisone, cortisone or the so called “allergy shot” or any secondary infections caused by flea bite allergy or mites, as well as cuts, scrapes, etc. I recommend a powder called 'Flowers of Sulfur' (also known as 'brimstone' or 'sublime sulfur').

      This substance has been used for thousands of years to cure all kinds of skin ailments and if there is itching, it will stop it very quickly. Google it to learn more about its healing properties.

      Even vets have forgotten about this wonderful and inexpensive remedy but fortunately you can still purchase it at your local pharmacy for very little money. You can also buy it online at http://www.pennherb.com/search?mp=s&se=Flowers+of+Sulphur+Powder

      Flowers of sulfur is safe to apply to your pet's skin but take care not to inhale sulfur powder.

      You can dust this powder on your dog's skin OR mix it with an oil to rub on the skin. I prefer the latter.

      The dusting can easily be accomplished if you use a powdered sugar duster or an empty talcum powder bottle. Separate the hair as you go around dusting to expose the skin until you have covered it.

      Alternatively, mix 2 tablespoons of flower of sulfur with 1 cup of Jojoba oil and put it in a bottle. Always shake to mix well before applying to the skin as it tends to separate. You do not need to wear gloves as it is not toxic to humans either.

  29. QUESTION:
    When choosing a pug puppy as a pet, is it best to have a male or female?
    I am considering one for my 10 year old daughter for her birthday.

    • ANSWER:
      Pugs are wonderful dogs, very loving and great with children, they are also very high maintanance dogs and their potiental health problems should be considered before purchasing this breed. Even though these are "potiental" problems the chances are you will have to deal with at least a few of them, i would make sure you are ok with paying higher vet bills than for some other breeds. Pugs due to the flat wrinkled faces are prone to chronic yeast infections in folds and ears(transfered by scratching and if not treated will go deaf), breathing problems due to folds and a elongated soft palate, eye problems due to folds or eye lids that roll called entropion (hair scratches eyes and if not fixed they will go blind.) Skin allergys this can be an allergy to flea bites, shampoos, flea treatments, outdoor allergys ect... Food allergys - can develope allergy to certian types of meat or other foods. There are other possible health problems for pugs epilepsy,progressive retinal atrophy, pigmentary keratitis, luxating patella, and pug dog encephalitis. Not that i do not like pugs, im owned by a four year old fawn male pug named pug. I bought him for 500$, in four years he has cost me over 4 thousand dollars in misc vet bills for differant breed specific issues and basic yearly vet bills included. I wouldnt trade him for the world, but deciding whether you want a boy or girl is really not that big of a issue , just make sure you really want the breed pug.

  30. QUESTION:
    Is there anything I should know about basset hounds?
    I am getting a 7wk old basset hound puppy tomorrow. Anything I should know about basset hounds before hand?

    • ANSWER:
      You needed to research the breed before getting the puppy so you know what to expect.

      1. Before I go into a lot, the number one thing is to take your pup to the vet for a thorough exam. The best vet is one that is familiar with basset hounds as it diminishes a lot of uneccessary treatments. A vet unfamiliar with bassets make look at their legs and think they have a deformity when there really isn't one.

      2. Handling. Get your puppy use to being handled every where. Get the puppy use to having the feet handled and nail trimming done. Personally I prefer a dremel to do nails and my gals were introduced to it while they were little.

      3. As soon as the pup is 2 weeks past the puppy vaccines, Socialize the pup. Have people visit, walk downtown, etc. Expose the puppy to as many situations as possible. Also socialize with other dogs especially since the pup is leaving it's mother so young. (7 weeks is really young and puppy will be missing out on a lot of it's mother's teaching.)
      4. Training - Patience, patience and more patience. Bassets love people but they want what they want when they want it. Two of the best commands you can teach them is "leave it and drop it" They are a little harder to train because of their determination. Potty training can be a challenge and can take up to a year with some bassets. If you are able to a dog door that is the best investment you can make once the pup is older. It really makes potty training so much easier. You have to be consistent with them and praise them for doing things right. They love attention. Yelling and especially spanking are detrimental to a bassets psyche. They are very sensitive and can mope for days.
      5. Keep them safe. No matter how well they may be trained, do not trust them off leash. All it takes is one good smell and they are off and running. Make sure that if you have a fenced yard to check it frequently for escape access. Gates should have locks on them. All it takes is for someone to open the gate and your basset is off and running. Microchip and make sure that they have a tag on just in case.
      8. Health issues.
      a. Eyes - Watch the eyes for signs of infection. Gentle washing daily goes a long way in preventing eye infections. You also need to familiarize your self with signs of glaucoma, cherry eye, etc.
      b. Ears- Have your vet show you how to clean the pups ears and what to use. Don't wash the ears with water as the canals don't get good air flow and that can lead to an infection. Also watch the ears for dirt and debris on the edges. Since the ears are so long they drag at times you do need to watch that the pup doesn't develop sore. Snoods are great during feeding time to help keep the ears flaps clean. Ears need cleaned weekly and possibly more frequently if you notice a large amount of brown gunk. I found the amount of gunk in the ears tends to be related to the food.
      c. Protect the back, neck and legs. No jumping off of furniture, out ofof the car, going up and down lots of stairs, etc. If the pup wears a collar avoid tugging as it can cause neck injury.
      d. Bloat. As a deep chested breed they are at risk for bloat. Please read up on this as it is a medical emergency.
      http://www.dailydrool.com/bloat.html
      e. Weight - most bassets are food motivated and have the "I'm starving look" down pat. An overweight basset is more prone to arthritis, back problems and many other health issues than a normal weight basset. Don't give in to the "looks" with food.
      f. Teeth and gums. I have come to the conclusion that bassets build tartar faster than any other breed I have ever had. Start brushing that puppies teeth and at least 3 times a week. This will go a long way in decreased cost of dentals.
      g. Skin Checks - You need to check their arm pits and tummies for redness/irritation. Bassets are prone to yeast due to the amount of loose skin they have. You can do the checks daily during "belly rub' sessions.
      h. Chewing. Bassets are big chewers for the most part. Have lots of chew toys and squeaker toys available. Kongs filled with peanut butter or yogurt and then frozen are great!
      i. A tired basset is a good basset. This is not a lazy breed and do require at least daily walks. Playing is also a great way for them to expend energy.
      j. Counter cruising. Yes unless the are taught well they will cruise the counters, end tables, dining room table for goodies. Keep things out of their reach especially food. Remote controls and telephones need to be out of reach.

      I do have to disagree with one poster. I have 3 bassets and only one has a little bit of separation anxiety and she is my 8 yr old rescue. She is very attached to me since I was the one that saved her. To be honest my girls have very little houndy smell and are only bathed every couple of months, unless they roll in something. I have found the amount of smell is directly related to their food. Also not all bassets drool. On

  31. QUESTION:
    I have a dog with re-occuring yeast infections please help?
    I have a Labrador Retriever that is about 3 years old, and hes on his 4th yeast infection within the last 6 months. Poor baby :( I have been back and forth to the vet getting antibiotics, antifungal meds and prednisone.The vet has done thyroid tests (came back normal), and skin samples to ensure it is not any kind of mite etc. I have tried changing his food multiple times, but nothing seems to work. He gets treated and gets better then within a few weeks gets it right back again :(. I have inquired about the new "allergy test" that is VERY expensive 500.00, and have friends that have had it done with a non-conclusive result. I am wondering if anyone out there has any good advice for me? I am looking for a good food that will not trigger a yeast infection. One I am looking at is by IAMS and says its for "sensitive systems". I am almost at the point where I may just feed him a diet of chicken and rice, its a lot of work but if it helps Oliver its worth it. Thanks in advance!!

    • ANSWER:
      Steroids are very dangerous and do not cure anything, they just mask the symptoms temporarily but the underlying cause remains. In your case, they may even be the cause of your dog's skin problems.

      As Dr. Karen Becker, DVM states - "Steroids (also called prednisone, cortisone or the nondescript “allergy shot”) are the least optimal treatment choice, as they work by suppressing your pet’s immune system. Not only can steroids have a negative effect on your pet’s liver, adrenal glands and kidneys, but suppressing your pet’s immune system with steroids also allows for opportunistic yeast and bacteria to grow on your pet’s skin..." Please read the information below: 'Steroids The Great Pretender - Even Low Steroid Doses Can Be Trouble'.
      http://www.shirleys-wellness-cafe.com/steroids.htm

      Many vets assume that pet owners just want to see their pets get better at all cost or if they are not sure about what the problem is they will prescribe steroids knowing the risks.

      If you want to get your dog cured for good, stop the steroids and try the following remedy. For any skin infection (bacterial or fungal) such as the ones commonly caused by the use of steroids like prednisone, cortisone or the allergy shot or any secondary infections caused by scratching, I recommend a powder called 'Flowers of Sulfur' (also known as 'brimstone' or 'sublime sulfur').

      This substance has been used for thousands of years to cure all kinds of skin ailments including fungal and bacterial infections and if there is itching, it will stop it very quickly. Google it to learn more about its healing properties.

      Even vets have forgotten about this wonderful and inexpensive remedy but fortunately you can still purchase it at your local pharmacy for very little money. You can also buy it online at http://www.pennherb.com/search?mp=s&se=Flowers+of+Sulphur+Powder

      Flowers of sulfur is safe to apply to your pet's skin but take care not to inhale sulfur powder.

      You can dust this powder on your dog's skin OR mix it with an oil to rub on the skin. I prefer the latter.

      The dusting can easily be accomplished if you use a powdered sugar duster or an empty talcum powder bottle. Separate the hair as you go around dusting to expose the skin until you have covered it.

      Alternatively, mix 2 tablespoons of flower of sulfur with 1 cup of Jojoba oil and put it in a bottle. Always shake to mix well before applying to the skin as it tends to separate. You do not need to wear gloves as it is not toxic to humans either.

  32. QUESTION:
    Is there any way to get rid of tinea on your torso?
    Is there anyway to get rid of tinea besides using selsun blue. That doens't work for me.
    It is tinea versicolor. When I go to the tanning bed I always get it, or can at least see it better. I saw a doctor for this a few years ago, and it wasn't the ringworm tinea. I forgot what he prescribed me, but I remember it took forever to get rid of it.

    • ANSWER:
      Tinea meaning ringworm is a contagious (with the exception of Tinea versicolor) fungal skin infection. Although its name means ringworm, in reality the skin condition is not caused by a worm but the name is derived from its characteristic pattern of distribution which refers to series of rings as it spread to the surrounding areas. Tinea infection is quite common among children and is contagious. The mode of transmission is usually through direct skin-to-skin contact, as well as contact with potential contaminated items. Soil is usually the source of the fungus but animals such as cats, dogs and rodents are carriers. The most often primary source of the fungus is from the infected persons. Minor skin trauma (e.g. scratches or excoriations and abrasions) and poor skin hygiene increases the potential for tinea infection. Over-the-counter topical creams, ointments, power and spray are the usual drug forms used to eradicated most of the fungal elements once diagnosed with tinea infection. The doctor most of the time recommend an antifungal topical ointment for ringworm of the skin or an oral medication for those with ringworm of the scalp and nails. It is very important that washing then drying first of the affected area is done first using a clean towel before the application of antifungal topical preparations. Clothing is advisable to be changed especially the underwear daily, particularly in cases of jock itch. The treatment is usually for a period of 2 weeks, even if the symptoms disappear. This is to prevent recurrence of the infection. Tinea Versicolor . Often abbreviated as TV, this condition is due to a sudden overgrowth of a yeast ubiquitous to human skin. Often abbreviated as TV, this condition is due to a sudden overgrowth of a yeast ubiquitous to human skin. The culprit, Malassezia furfur, is a yeast that grows on everyone’s skin. M. furfur is not contagious and is typically an organism we never realize is there. So the condition is not contagious. For a creature found on 90-100 percent of adults, it’s only a nuisance to some 2-8% of all Americans. However, since heat and humidity do play a role in developing this condition, Southerners are far more likely than Northerners to develop TV. And in some humid tropical countries, the rate of developing TV approaches fifty percent! In keeping with the name versicolor, the eruption is most commonly characterized by an odd assortment of flat, scaling multi-hued creamy and brown patches, which polka dot the upper torso, shoulders, neckline and sometimes the lower face. Edges of the dime-sized patches may coalesce, merging into larger patches. Sunlight makes the rash far more noticeable, explaining why so many TV patients seek out the dermatologist each summer. The yeast can stimulate melanosomes (packages of the skin pigment melanin) to be come larger. Once sunlight strikes the area, pigment darkens the affected portions of the skin. Imagine each polka dot tanning.
      On the flip side, some patients suffer from lightening of the skin affected by the rash. While this is actually due to the M. furfur producing a skin-lightening acid, it is easy to visualize as a bad tan line. The skin around it darkens from getting tan, exaggerating the spots assaulted by a loss of pigment.
      Two less common forms of the tinea versicolor rash exist. In patients who are immunocompromised, the rash may be “inverted”, affecting nontraditional areas such as the face, extremities and flexures of the arms. Finally, M. furfur can cause an infection of the skin surrounding the hair follicles of the torso, arms and legs. Difficult to differentiate from a bacterial infection of the hair follicles, it can appear as red bumps or pustules. A culture can rule out the diagnosis a bacterial infection. Patients who use steroids or antibiotics, are diabetic or receiving chemotherapy or live in a very humid climate may be more likely to experience this folliculitis. So now we know what it looks like, but why does it happen to just some of us? M. furfur is normally a “couch potato” type of normal flora. It’s a yeast that simply hangs out on the skin minding its own business. In fact, in its routine state it is incapable of causing tinea versicolor. This yeast must literally change shape in order to be capable of causing a rash. Tinea versicolor is not medically concerning or life threatening. In fact it is technically a “cosmetic” concern (unless you’re the one suffering from it in which case it’s a disaster). So calling the problem-causing form of the yeast “disease-causing” seems a stretch. Be that as it may, factors known to trigger the yeast to change into its “disease-causing” form include genetics, hot, humid weather, suppressed immunity (HIV, cancer, diabetes, etc.), malnutrition, steroid use and Cushing disease. But remember, the vast majority of people who develop TV are perfectly healthy. Of course, everything needs sustenance and M. furfur is no different. It’s not merely the form of the yeast that’s problematic; it’s the nutritional source to keep it thriving. That would be us. Malassezia furfur is a lipid-loving yeast, thriving on areas of the skin rich in sebum such as the back and chest. Young adults between the ages of 15 and 24 have the highest levels of surface skin oils, and hence are more likely to suffer from TV. Prepubescent children don´t make sebum and as one reaches menopause, sebum levels are also reduced. It is very uncommon to see tinea versicolor affect preteens or seniors.
      It’s been shown that is not the amount of sweat and sebum produced that triggers tinea versicolor. Rather, it’s been suggested the yeast flourish because of something in the sebum. At one time it was thought that perhaps affected individuals produced sebum with higher lipid (fat) levels. Now the theory is that perhaps amino acids found in the sebum may factor into the conversion of the yeast into a form capable of causing the rash. Diagnosis is usually quite obvious to the trained eye of the dermatologist. However, when in doubt, a microscopic test called a KOH is performed. This consists of the doctor painlessly performing a light skin scraping with a small blade. The scales are placed onto a glass slide, a droplet of liquid (potassium hydroxide) is placed onto the slide and then it is examined under the microscope. A positive test shows what we fondly call the "spaghetti and meatballs" sign under the microscope. Hyphae and spores from the yeast are both present and provide that creative appearance. Sure, everyone would love to pop a pill and put an end to struggling with tinea versicolor once and for all. Ketoconazole (Nizoral), fluconazole (Diflucan), terbinafine (Lamisil) and itraconazole (Sporanox) are the preferred prescription oral medications. But the reality is that while the rash may clear, the medication doesn´t prevent the inevitable recurrences.Treatment is aimed at controlling the condition on a chronic basis. If we don’t, the problem will likely come back. Ease of treatment is imperative as well as trying to keep it aesthetically pleasing. Interestingly enough, although M. furfur is most commonly associated with tinea versicolor, it has been linked as a trigger factor with other common dermatologic concerns including seborrheic dermatitis (aka seborrhea or dandruff), psoriasis, perioral dermatitis and some forms of atopic dermatitis. That’s why treatments for one disease can be beneficial for another. Dermatologists have long turned to "off label" (not officially approved by the FDA) options to treat tinea versicolor. Part of this is that they simply work; the treaments are also easily available to patients who don´t have access to physicians or must wait for an appointment. When consulting with such distinguished resources as the Merck Manual to the National Library of Medicine and NIH Medical Encyclopedia, lengthy lists of officially "off label", yet tried and true dermatologic therapies are listed for TV. Lamisil Cream and Spray were once available only by prescription. At that time they carried the FDA indication for treating tinea versicolor. When the product went OTC Lamisil AT Athlete´s Foot Spray and Lamisil AT Cream - For Women, the indication was dropped. Likewise prescription Lotrimin is indicated for the treatment of tinea versicolor; OTC in the same strength, it is not. Prescription 2% miconazole cream (Monistat-Derm) also carried the FDA indication for treating tinea versicolor. Again, now that 2 % miconazole is OTC, it no longer carries this indication. Prescription creams available to treat TV include: Spectazole (Econazole Nitrate), Mentax (Butenafine Hydrochloride) and Oxistat (Oxiconazole Nitrate), Loprox (Ciclopirox) and Naftin (Naftifine Hydrochloride). Dandruff shampoos are a longstanding favorite of ermatologists in TV therapy. Patients wash their bodies with dandruff shampoos that contain selenium sulfide, ketoconazole or pyrithione zinc once a day for 2 weeks. It is good to note that prescription Nizoral 2% Shampoo is indicated for treating tinea versicolor. These active ingredients help kill yeast. Pyrithione zinc has been medically proven to kill the yeast that live upon the skin and drive this (and other) dermatologic conditions. Kill the yeast, clear the skin. Continued use creates an environment hostile to their regrowth and keeps skin looking clear and healthy. Independent clinical trials results found DERMAdoctor Born To Be Mild Medicated Face & Body Cleanser 100% as gentle, non-irritating and non-drying as Cetaphil Gentle Skin Cleanser. So no worries about drying or irritating the skin which is often seen when skin is washed with a dandruff bar or shampoo. It is an "off label" treatment that I recommend to my patients. This is an additional step to keep in mind for anyone prone to recalcitrant tinea versicolor. Reducing the amount of oil on the skin may help clear resistant TV. Try applying DERMAdoctor Tease Zone Oil Control Gel daily to affected areas. Cleansing with a glycolic acid cleanser to dissolve excessive torso oils such as DERMAdoctor Wrinkle Revenge Antioxidant Enhanced Glycolic Acid Facial Cleanser 1 or performing a home glycolic acid peel with MD Skincare Alpha Beta Daily Body Peel may also be helpful.
      I hope this has all been of help too!
      Matador 89

  33. QUESTION:
    My Dog is Scratching so much he is going bald. Is there a Shampoo or something I can use to help him?
    He does nothing but scratch and chew himself. His legs are blad His ears are Bald and he looks Sad. I just want to make him feel better.

    • ANSWER:
      You need to take your dog to a vet for a thorough exam. This could be a number of things.Scratching dogs generally may suffer fur loss when they develop a skin allergies and infections from excessive scratching that can be caused by anything from mange, to flea bites to infections to thyroid deficiency, to any other number of things. Sadly this fur loss often is permanent, especially if the dog develops a yeast-type infection or bacterial infection in the skin. Your safest bet is to let the vet check the dog and do skin scrapings to determine what it is so he can give the proper treatment.

      Papaw

  34. QUESTION:
    My dogs white fur is going red in places and she is scratching a lot?
    I have a white shitzu just over a year old. Her white fur on her bottom is going red, as is on the joints underneath her chest. We have treated her for fleas but yet she is still scratching . Please can anyone help with advice

    • ANSWER:
      I see a few possible causes for the itching. Itching can be caused by an allergic reaction (to flea bites, the food or treats you give her, the grooming products or house-cleaning products you are using), mites or steroid use (also called prednisone, cortisone or the so-called 'allergy shot'). Scratching opens the door to secondary skin infections.

      ALLERGIES

      Many dogs are allergic to flea bites so even one flea on an allergic dog may cause a lot of havoc. You may not be able to see the fleas directly but you can always see the debris they leave behind that looks like finely ground coffee. If you see these and put them in water, they will turn red.

      You can get rid of the fleas on your dog with natural methods so that he is not exposed to the toxic chemicals of Frontline, Advantage and other popular flea medications which will harm her sooner or later. Check this link for recommendations http://www.wikihow.com/Get-Rid-of-Fleas-Naturally Also, you can dust your yard where she roams with inexpensive diatomaceous earth. For more info on its use to control fleas see http://www.care2.com/greenliving/all-around-non-toxic-flea-control.html and http://wolfcreekranch1.tripod.com/diatomaceous_earth_fleas.html

      Check the ingredients of the food/treats you give her. Dogs digestive system is not designed to handle grains well. If they contain grains such as wheat or corn stop them immediately. Get food/treats that have no grains and that have meat as a primary ingredient – chicken, lamb, salmon, etc.

      If you just introduced a new grooming product (or a house cleaning product), discontinue it immediately.

      MITES

      There are three types of mites that attack dogs most often: demodectic (not contagious and may itch or not), sarcoptic (very contagious and extremely itchy) and cheyletiella (contagious and mildly itchy). This condition is known as mange. The typical symptoms of mange as the condition progresses include hair loss and scaly or crusty skin.

      If the reason for the itching is mites, avoid the medications most often prescribed by vets that contain toxic chemicals that will harm your dog sooner or later. These are Ivermectin (also known as Ivomec) and Amitraz (also known as Mitaban). Instead, I recommend a natural, effective, easy to use, and inexpensive spray treatment that will kill the mites but is harmless to pets and humans. You can get it at http://www.florapetnaturals.com/online-store.html

      STEROID USE

      As Dr. Karen Becker, DVM states - "Steroids (also called prednisone, cortisone or the nondescript “allergy shot”) are the least optimal treatment choice, as they work by suppressing your pet’s immune system. Not only can steroids have a negative effect on your pet’s liver, adrenal glands and kidneys, but suppressing your pet’s immune system with steroids also allows for opportunistic yeast and bacteria to grow on your pet’s skin..." Please read the information below: 'Steroids The Great Pretender - Even Low Steroid Doses Can Be Trouble'.
      http://www.shirleys-wellness-cafe.com/steroids.htm

      Vets nowadays assume that pet owners just want to see their pets get better at all cost or if they are not sure about what the problem is they will prescribe steroids knowing the risks. Steroids are very dangerous and do not cure anything, they just mask the symptoms temporarily but the underlying cause remains.

      SKIN INFECTION AND ITCHING REMEDY

      For any skin infection (bacterial or fungal) such as the ones commonly caused by the use of steroids like Prednisone, cortisone or the so called “allergy shot” or any secondary infections caused by flea bite allergy or mites, as well as cuts, scrapes, etc. I recommend a powder called 'Flowers of Sulfur' (also known as 'brimstone' or 'sublime sulfur').

      This substance has been used for thousands of years to cure all kinds of skin ailments and if there is itching, it will stop it very quickly. Google it to learn more about its healing properties.

      Even vets have forgotten about this wonderful and inexpensive remedy but fortunately you can still purchase it at your local pharmacy for very little money. You can also buy it online at http://www.pennherb.com/search?mp=s&se=Flowers+of+Sulphur+Powder

      Flowers of sulfur is safe to apply to your pet's skin but take care not to inhale sulfur powder.

      You can dust this powder on your dog's skin OR mix it with an oil to rub on the skin. I prefer the latter.

      The dusting can easily be accomplished if you use a powdered sugar duster or an empty talcum powder bottle. Separate the hair as you go around dusting to expose the skin until you have covered it.

      Alternatively, mix 2 tablespoons of flower of sulfur with 1 cup of Jojoba oil and put it in a bottle. Always shake to mix well before applying to the skin as it tends to separate. You do not need to wear gloves as it is not toxic to humans either.

  35. QUESTION:
    How can I tell if my dog is allergic to her food?

    • ANSWER:
      There is a distinction that needs to be made between food allergies and food intolerances. Food allergies are true allergies and show the characteristic symptoms of itching and skin problems associated with canine and feline allergies. Food intolerances can result in diarrhea or vomiting and do not create a typical allergic response. Food intolerances in pets would be similar to people that get diarrhea or an upset stomach from eating spicy or fried foods. Fortunately, both food intolerances and allergies can be eliminated with a diet free from offending agents.Common food culprits

      Several studies have shown that some ingredients are more likely to cause food allergies than others. In order of the most common offenders in dogs are beef, dairy products, chicken, wheat, chicken eggs, corn, and soy. As you may have noticed, the most common offenders are the most common ingredients in dog foods. This correlation is not a coincidence. While some proteins might be slightly more antigenic than others, many proteins are similar in form and the incidence of allergic reactions are probably associated with the amount of exposure. For example, pet foods have historically been made up of beef, chicken, corn, and wheat. In an effort to combat food allergies, several companies produced a diet made of lamb and rice. There was nothing special about lamb and rice diets except those two ingredients were normally not present in pet foods. Animals had not eaten lamb or rice before, and therefore, had not developed an allergy to it yet. If the main ingredients in pet food become lamb and rice, then it would stand to reason that the most common problem foods could become lamb and rice. The determinant of whether a food is likely to cause a food allergy or not is based on the structure and size of the glycoprotein in the food. In addition, many lamb and rice-based foods contain many other ingredients, and if the animal has a food allergy to any of them, this lamb and rice food will do nothing to treat the food allergy. In addition, while many people criticized and blamed preservatives and flavorings as a source of food allergies, studies have shown that they are not the causes, and while we may not have justifiable health concerns about preservatives, food allergies is not one of them.

      Symptoms

      The symptoms of food allergies are similar to those of most allergies seen in dogs and cats. The primary symptom is itchy skin. Symptoms may also include chronic or recurrent ear infections, hair loss, excessive scratching, hot spots, and skin infections that respond to antibiotics but reoccur after antibiotics are discontinued. There is evidence that dogs with food allergies may sometimes have an increased incidence of bowel movements. One study showed that non-allergic dogs have around 1.5 bowel movements per day where some dogs with food allergies may have 3 or more per day.

      It is difficult to distinguish an animal suffering from food allergies from an animal suffering from atopy or other allergies based on physical signs. However, there are a few signs that always make me suspect food allergies. One of these, is a dog with recurrent ear problems, particularly yeast infections. Another, is a very young dog with moderate or severe skin problems. A third tip off, is if a dog suffers from allergies year-round or if the symptoms begin in the winter. And the final clue, is a dog that has very itchy skin but does not respond to antihistamines or steroid treatment.

      Diagnosis

      The diagnosis for food allergies is very straightforward. But due to the fact that many other problems can cause similar symptoms and that many times animals are suffering from more problems than just food allergies, it is very important that all other problems are properly identified and treated prior to undergoing diagnosis for food allergies. Atopy, flea bite allergies, intestinal parasite hypersensitivities, sarcoptic mange, and yeast or bacterial infections can all cause similar symptoms as food allergies. Once all other causes have been ruled out or treated, then it is time to perform a food trial.

      Elimination diets and provocative testing: A food trial consists of feeding an animal a novel food source of protein and carbohydrate for 12 weeks. A novel food source would be a protein and carbohydrate that the animal had never eaten before. An example would be rabbit and rice, or venison and potato, or duck and rutabagas. These are homemade diets but there are several commercial diets available on the market. Special Foods produced by Hill's and Purina, and a food named EXclude are used by many dermatologists. Regardless of the diet used, it must be the only thing the animal eats for 12 weeks. This means no treats; absolutely nothing but the special food and water. Young growing pets have special dietary needs and a homemade diet that only contains one protein and one carbohydrate with no multivitamin or fatty acid may not be suitable even for only twelve weeks. For puppies undergoing a food trial, a balanced commercial diet like the ones listed above is recommended.

      A food trial consists of feeding a dog a novel food source of protein and carbohydrate for 12 weeks.
      Veterinarians used to recommend that a pet only needed to be placed on a special diet for 3 weeks, but new studies show that in dogs, only 26% of those with food allergies responded by day 21. However, the vast majority of pets responded by 12 weeks. Therefore, it is very important to keep the pet on the diet for the entire 12 weeks. If the dog shows a marked reduction or elimination of the symptoms, then the animal is placed back on the original food. This is called 'provocative testing' and is essential to confirm the diagnosis. If the symptoms return after going back on the original diet, the diagnosis of a food allergy is confirmed. If there has been no change in symptoms but a food allergy is still strongly suspected, then another food trial using a different novel food source could be tried.

      We must reiterate that placing a dog on a commercial lamb and rice formula dog food is not an acceptable way to diagnose or treat food allergies. Lamb and rice are no longer considered novel food sources and most commercial lamb and rice diets also contain wheat, egg, corn, or other ingredients that can be the cause of the food allergy. Despite the implication by dog food companies to the contrary, these foods do not prevent food allergies nor are they considered adequate for diagnosis. While these diets may provide adequate nutrition, they are not a substitute for a true, novel protein source diet.

      http://www.dogsonly.org/FoodAllergies.html

  36. QUESTION:
    My dog's starting to get scabs on his neck and ears. He scratches at them and they get raw?
    His ears have scabs on them and he's losing a good amount of hair. (not going bald but has bald parts where his scab or open scab wound is) Please help me! Thank you and have a good day.

    • ANSWER:
      Can be a few things, ear mites, skin infection or a yeast infection.....You should consult a vet for the proper treatment... Hope it helps :)

  37. QUESTION:
    What can cause a St, Bernard to start loosing his hair?
    He scratches alot, and he stay's in the house alot of the time. I know it is not the time of the year to be loosing his hair.

    • ANSWER:
      Food allergies.
      Bacterial infection (caused by scratching at fleas, improper diet,)
      Yeast infection (caused by excessive moisture on the skin, improper diet, or scratching at fleas)
      fleas (you have to treat all though winter to avoid infestations)
      Several different mange bugs. You need a vet to identify them and give you the correct treatment.
      Basically, you need a vet. They will diagnose the bugs for you (or whatever it is) and give you the proper treatment. Don't use any of the home remedies you will get here, you may do more harm than good.

      Read the label on his food. If it contains any corn or wheat products, consider switching.
      Corn and wheat are allergens for dogs.
      Look into Artemis, Innova, Wellness, and Canidae.

  38. QUESTION:
    Outside of taking my dog to the vet, is there a natural remedy for Malassezia in dogs?
    My dog I believe has Malassezia, unfortunately I have no income and can't take her to the vet. Is there a natrual remedy to treat an yeast infection? or even to help ease the symptoms. We make our own dog food, add oil to food, bathe her at least once a month but usually twice a month,and especially the odor of the dog. Please help

    • ANSWER:
      I'm going to assume by making your own dog food you mean a raw diet, with raw plain beef, buffalo, chicken, or etc. meat with added vitamin/mineral balancer (http://k9rawdiet.com/Animal-Essentials-Herbal-Multi-Vitamin-for-Cats-Dogs-pr-138.html) and added omega 3&6 oil(http://k9rawdiet.com/Iceland-Pure-Wild-Sardine-Anchovy-Oil-pharmaceutical-grade-and-unscented-17-oz-pr-200.html). I'm hoping you don't mean human food, if you are, I suggest you stop and put her on a high quality kibble, like Blue Buffalo Wilderness.

      Usually, this is a fungal yeast infection that is recurring in dogs. Now, the only thing I could find was this on a vet website:

      "The treatment the authors recommended with good evidence was topical treatment with a shampoo containing a combination of 2% miconazole nitrate and 2% chlorhexidine gluconate applied twice a week for three weeks. Systemically, two oral treatments were recommended with fair support: ketoconazole and itraconazole. Although a dosage range of 5 to 10 mg/kg ketoconazole given once a day for three weeks is effective, the authors recommended the lower dose of 5 mg/kg because it appeared to be as effective as the higher dose yet would lessen the chances of adverse effects. The recommended dose for itraconazole is 5 mg/kg given once a day two consecutive days a week for three weeks. Administration with food is recommended to enhance absorption. The authors did not find strong enough evidence to support other therapies. In those animals that experience chronic relapses, regular topical treatments or pulse therapy with itraconazole is recommended. Topical therapies are preferred because of the lower risk for toxicity. The authors recommend single-agent studies to further evaluate each drug’s individual efficacy and optimal frequency of administration."

      You may be able to buy these things at the vet or even at a human pharmacy or pet store and save a lot. Now, I don't suggest it, but it may be your only option.

      Keep bathing down, as she already has itchy dry skin. The bathing makes it worse.

  39. QUESTION:
    If a dog gets frequent yeast infections could it be something serious?
    Where can I go online to get more information?

    • ANSWER:
      MALESSEZIA DERMATITIS
      (Yeast Infection of the Skin)

      WHY SUSPECT YEAST?

      Yeast infections are especially itchy, crusty, and smelly. Often a dog starts with a rash or with simple itching but the skin thickens to an "elephant" skin appearance. The itch is extreme and the odour can be especially troublesome. Parts of the body or the entire body can be affected. Mostly dogs are affected but cats can get yeast infections as well. Yeasts are the spore-like forms of fungi; Malessezia dermatitis is a fungal infection of the skin.

      WHERE WOULD A DOG GET A YEAST INFECTION?

      Yeast happily live on most normal skin and in ears and anal glands. To get a yeast infection, conditions on the skin surface have to change to favour the proliferation of the yeasts. The yeasts in small normal numbers are harmless but when the yeasts are present in large numbers, disease results.

      So what conditions lead to a yeast proliferation? An increase in skin oils (which often occurs in an allergic flare up) would be the most common situation. Sometimes there is an immune deficiency which allows the yeast proliferation. Some animals are battling seborrhoea (excessive oil production of the skin) and thus are naturally predisposed to the yeast proliferation. Some animals are actually allergic to the yeasts themselves. The most important thing to realize is that yeast infections are not contagious but they tend to recur unless the underlying allergy, seborrhoea, or whatever problem is controlled.

      The following breeds are predisposed genetically to yeast infections: the West Highland White Terrier, Basset Hound, Cocker Spaniel, Silky Terrier, Australian Terrier, Maltese, Chihuahua, Poodle, Shetland Sheepdog, Lhasa Apso, and the Dachshund.

      HOW IS THIS CONFIRMED?

      There are several testing methods to confirm the overgrowth of yeasts:

      Impression smear (pressing a microscope slide on the skin to collect yeast organisms)

      Scotch tape sampling (pressing a piece of clear tape to the skin to collect yeast organisms)

      Skin scraping with a blade (scraping the skin with a blade to collect yeast organisms)

      Cotton swab (rubbing a moistened Q-tip on the skin to collect yeast organisms)

      Skin Biopsy (removing a small plug of skin with a biopsy punch with a local anesthetic. This is the most invasive choice but provides substantially more diagnostic information)
      Very few yeasts need to be seen under the microscope to confirm yeast infection.

      HOW DO WE GET RID OF IT?

      Treatment can be topical, oral, or both. Topical treatment alone is not usually adequate but, since oral medications are expensive, often topical management alone is attempted first, especially if the pet is small enough for convenient frequent bathing or if only a small body area is involved.

      Shampoos: While degreasing shampoos such as the benzoyl peroxide (oxydex®, pyoben®) and sulfur/salicylate (sebolyte®, sebolux®) shampoos will help remove the skin oils feeding the yeast, there are shampoos that are specifically anti-yeast. We prefer the 4% Chlorhexidine shampoo called Chlorhexiderm Max as it both strips skin oil and kills yeast; however, other anti-yeast products include Selsun Blue, Miconazole shampoo, Nizoral shampoo, and more. The pet must be bathed twice a week to start and the shampoo requires a 15 minute contact time (meaning do not rinse the lather for 15 minutes).

      Spot Treatments:

      If only a small area is involved, it is probably not necessary to bathe the entire animal. Special acetic acid wipes can be used to cleanse the affected area. Mixtures of vinegar and water can be used but the pet will develop a distinct vinegar odour.

      Oral therapy: Ketoconazole (Nizoral®) rules when it comes to oral therapy. Typically a several week treatment is needed and there are numerous protocols involving different dosing schedules. Higher doses tend to be needed if recurrence is a problem. The extreme itch usually resolves within one week. This medication is expensive, especially in larger dogs, but often there is no way around its use.

      Treatment of the Underlying cause: It is important to realize that yeast overgrowth occurs in response to a primary problem be it allergy, seborrhoea or something else. If the underlying problem is not controlled, yeast dermatitis is likely to periodically recur.

      Veterinary Partner
      Web Site

      What is Malassezia dermatitis?

      Malassezia pachydermatitis is a common yeast organism that is found on normal and abnormal canine skin and ears. On normal healthy skin it causes no problems, but when the environment of the skin is altered for any one of many reasons, Malassezia can cause severe dermatitis or otitis (inflammation of the skin or ears respectively). Some of the factors that can lead to Malassezia dermatitis include moisture (as in dogs with skin folds or floppy ears with narrow ear canals), excessive waxy or scaly build-up (as in seborrhea), and allergic and bacterial skin disease.

      Not only is Malassezia a secondary cause of dermatitis in any dog with one of these predisposing conditions, but it may be the primary or initiating cause of skin problems in certain breeds of dogs. This may be related to an alteration in immune response to the yeast.

      Malassezia pachydermatitis is also known as Malassezia canis, Pityrosporum pachydermatitis, P. canis.

      How is Malassezia dermatitis inherited?

      Unknown

      What breeds are affected by Malassezia dermatitis?

      Malassezia can be a complicating factor in a dog of any breed with a skin condition, but dogs of the following breeds have a higher risk of Malassezia dermatitis or otitis: American cocker spaniel, basset hound, dachshund, English setter, poodle, Shetland Sheepdog, Shih Ezu, and many Terrier breeds including the West Highland White, Australian, Jack Russell, Maltese, and Silky.

      For many breeds and many disorders, the studies to determine the mode of inheritance or the frequency in the breed have not been carried out, or are inconclusive. We have listed breeds for which there is a consensus among those investigating in this field and among veterinary practitioners, that the condition is significant in this breed.

      What does Malassezia dermatitis mean to your dog & you?

      Malassezia ear and/or skin infections are extremely itchy. The problem may be confined to certain regions - generally the ears, lips, muzzle, inner thighs, or feet - and your dog may chew its feet or scratch in a frenzied manner at the muzzle or ears with its front paws. With ear infection there is often head shaking, pain if the ear is touched, and a waxy discharge. Dogs with more generalized Malassezia dermatitis have reddened, itchy, crusty skin, and are often greasy, scaly and smelly.

      Malassezia dermatitis often starts in the summer, corresponding to an increase in humidity and to allergy season, and persists over the winter.

      How is Malassezia dermatitis diagnosed?

      About 50% of dogs with this condition have an underlying problem, especially seborrhea, allergies, or a bacterial skin infection. Dogs with these conditions generally all have greasy, crusty, smelly skin but where there is Malassezia infection, there is also extreme itchiness.

      It is essential to sort out whether the Malassezia is the primary problem or is occurring secondary to another condition that can be treated. In either case the yeast infection must be cleared up, and then your veterinarian will look for an underlying cause. If none can be found, and the yeast infection quickly recurs, this suggests that the Malassezia is the primary problem.

      For the veterinarian: There are many differential diagnoses for this condition and most of them can also be associated with or can trigger Malassezia infection. This can make diagnosis perplexing. Malassezia-associated dermatitis should be considered in any persistent scaly, seborrheic, pruritic dermatitis where other differentials have been ruled out and there is a lack of response to treatment.

      Cytologic examination is a useful and readily available diagnostic tool. Samples are collected by vigorous rubbing of a cotton swab on affected skin, superficial skin scrapings or pressing a slide onto the skin. These samples should be heat-fixed, stained (NMB or Diff-Quik), and examined for numerous round or oval, budding yeast-like cells.

      Skin biopsies may also demonstrate the presence of the yeast. Culture is not a reliable way to identify a Malassezia infection.

      How is Malassezia dermatitis treated?

      This condition is treated with anti-fungal drugs and medicated shampoos. The itchiness usually subsides within a week, and the skin lesions within a few more weeks. Your dog must continue taking the drug for another week or so beyond that.

      Commonly there is recurrence of the yeast infection, although the frequency may be reduced if an underlying cause can be identified and treated or managed. Sometimes maintenance treatment is required to prevent frequent yeast infections. This may involve weekly medicated baths and your dog taking antifungal drugs once or twice a week. Your veterinarian will work with you to determine how your dog's skin condition can best be kept under control.

      Breeding advice

      Although little is known about the inheritance of this condition, it is preferable not to use dogs with severe or recurring yeast infections for breeding.

      For more information about this disorder, please see your Vet.

  40. QUESTION:
    Is it unhealthy not to bathe my dog?
    I have a Siberian Husky (lots of hair!) who hates getting baths about as much as I hate giving them. She doesn't really smell or look dirty, so do I really need to wash her?
    BTW, she's up-to-date on all shots, heartworm and flea/tick meds.
    Ok, people. I am aware that there are professional groomers out there. I am aware that some dogs are smelly. I am aware that fleas and ticks exist. However, like I said, MY DOG does not smell, nor does she have fleas or ticks. All I want to know is whether or not it is physically unhealthy for her not to be bathed. I don't want your opinions! I just want to prove my roommate wrong and the vet is closed on Sundays!

    • ANSWER:
      If she's not smelly or dirty, she does not really need a bath, no.

      A daily brushing to remove dirt, debris and dead hair is all she really needs.

      Bathing actually strips the skin and coat of natural body oils, which can make the skin dry and the coat brittle.. bathing itself does not prevent fleas and ticks, frontline and advantage do. Even if you bathe your dog every day, it can still get fleas, unless you use proper treatment.

      Daily brushing is far more beneficial to the skin and coat than a bath is! If you brush her properly, you can remove a lot of debris from the coat, and help distribute those body oils thru her coat.

      She only needs to be bathed if she gets dirty or smelly.

      Every day dirt does not cause mange or staph infection either! Dogs actually have to be exposed to these to get them! I know of a dog who got staph after being groomed!!! The coat also protects the skin from exposure.. most of the time, dogs get skin infections because the owners do not brush the dog, the hair gets matted, and it holds moisture in to the skin, which allows bacteria, yeast and fungus to grow and fester.. daily brushing will prevent this!

      Dogs in the wild do not get bathed AT ALL, and you dont see them running around with open sores and horrible skin infections.

  41. QUESTION:
    My chihuahua is losing small chunks of hair?
    My chihuahua is about 5 or 6 years old (he has about 35% grey hair-and shelter never knew how old he was exactly) and he is losing small chunks of hair about 1/4 inch and has bumps on those spots. I haven't really changed their diet so I don't know if this is due to age? But he has also gotten some sort of crust on the sides of his mouth before and swollen paws with bloody claws. The vet has given him antibiotics but it only goes away while the medicine lasts.

    Any ideas as to what it might be?

    • ANSWER:
      May be atopy. Nail bed infections and discharge can occur with this common environmental skin allergy. How long have you had him? Did you adopt him as an older adult recently? So he could be 8 or 9? A 5 or 6 year old Chihuahua is still quite young, as tiny breeds have longer lifespans, and unlikely to be greying at such a young age.

      Sounds like he has a secondary skin infection at a minimum currently, and needs some antibiotics and anti-inflammatory medication at a minimum. Corticosteroids on a tapered dose for 2-3 weeks usually helps once their infection is so severe alopecia, collaretes, pustules, and infected nails are evident. The antibiotics should be given for 2-3 weeks minimum, and if he's already had a round without completely "clearing" the infection, he needs a culture and sensitivity test done on a sample of his skin to see which antibiotic will successfully eradicate his infection. Cephalosporins, such as cephalexin and Simplicef (cefpodoxime), are the primary treatment choices of the many antibiotic choices available for dogs, when dealing with skin, post-op, and superficial wounds. I prefer Simplicef because it is a once daily med and has much less GI side effects associated with administration.

      Secondary yeast infections are very common, so an impression/tape prep slide of affected skin areas is necessary to make sure he only has excess bacteria in these areas, and not excess yeast also. Both bacteria (Staph) and yeast (Malasezzia) are abundant on skin, but infection colonies are much more prolific than naturally occurring colonies. He may need oral antifungals (ketoconozole or fluconozole) in addition to a round of antibiotics. Chi's are so small, they usually must have these uniquely compounded at a separate pharmacy from your vet or human pharmacy.

      Infections will keep recurring as secondary symptoms of a dog with allergic atopy. Otherwise, checking for endocrine dysfunction/disease is good diagnostic practice for dogs with recurring skin practice, to rule out hypothyroidism and Cushing's disease (hyperadrenocorticism).

      After one round of a cephalosporin, checking for yeast, then atopy, then for endocrine disease, are next in a good diagnostic work-up, as each is ruled out in step-wise fashion. Get back to the vet, as the sooner you follow up, the less it will cost your wallet and your dog's health. Vets often only charge recheck exam fees or zero the exam fee, when you are a consistent, compliant client with a good veterinary/owner relationship.

  42. QUESTION:
    Is eating cat food bad for my dog?
    She prefers the cat food to the dog food. The only thing that gets eaten is the cat food meant for the cat. I was going to just start buying cat food and not even buy the dog food but am not sure how good this is for the dog.

    If it isn't good for her, how do you recomend keeping her from eating the cat food?

    • ANSWER:
      Oh my god, CAT FOOD IS HORRIBLE FOR DOGS.

      First of all it contains none of the nutrients a dog needs, it's formulated for a cat not a dog, it'll cause severe allergies, yeast infections and hair loss, if you want to spend 00.00's at your vet for treatment then by all means feed cat food.

      I help out a group called Rescuedme.org, they rescued a beagle that had been fed nothing but cat food and ol' roy he scratched out all his hair, he had terrible elephant like skin, he smelt HORRIBLE due to the yeast infection and was emaciated. I wish I had a way to attach his photos because he was a mess. After being in a foster home for over a month and getting a special bath each week and being fed nothing but holistic food his hair has started to grow back in and he's put on weight.

      So if you want to kill your dog, then by all means feed him cat food.

  43. QUESTION:
    My dog is on treatment for his skin, and we want to get him a cologne, but we dont want to make the skin worse?
    Can we try colonge?
    If we can what one should we use to get rid of the terrible smell?
    We have tryed baths but it isnt working.

    • ANSWER:
      What shampoo and treatment is he on. If it is a yeast infection like my dog had, all you need to do is follow the vet's instruction for treatment. If he has an underlying food allergy, you will need to change that as well
      Remember he doesn't like cologne. He can smell 500 times better than you.

  44. QUESTION:
    Does anybody have any home remedies/suggestions dealing with tear stains?
    Just got a new puppy....she already at 6 weeks has tear stains? Is their anyway to deal with this other than using "Angel Eyes"? Just worried that she is too young right now to be using medicinal options.

    • ANSWER:
      Here is some information on tear stains. In the article they suggest using barotic acid. That should be boric acid.

      Tear Stain Causes

      Whenever hair rests around the eyes some amount of tear staining results from the hair wicking moisture from the eyes. But there are many other sources of tear stains.
      Tear staining can be traced to health and diet, as well as genetics. Most veterinarians agree that face staining results from excessive tearing. In this case, the damp face hair is a breeding ground for bacterial and yeast growth. The most common is "Red Yeast" which is usually associated with reddish-brown facial stains, and which may emit a moderate to noticeably strong odour. Tear ducts may become infected and result in excess tearing and noticeable staining.
      Some doctors advise that the eye structure was the most probable source of the problem. If that is so, then genetics would likely play a role and explain why the problem is more pronounced in some pets of the same breed. If you are purchasing a puppy and you care concerned about the potential for tearing and staining, you should observe the mother and sire, and others in the direct lineage.
      Eye duct surgical procedures to increase their tear capacity may help some pets; ask your veterinarian.
      If bacterial and yeast infections are involved you need to take steps to mollify and eliminate their presence. Veterinarians can prescribe medication to treat bacterial and yeast infections. Your veterinarian or eye specialist veterinarians can determine if excessive tearing is the source of stains, and describe alternatives available.

      Tear staining in the dog and especially in the small breeds (Poodles, Maltese, Bichons, Pekes ) is common but should never be called "normal." The reality is that these breeds have tiny hairs in the inner aspect of the lid margin that acts as wicks for tear accumulation. As well, the tear film is constantly evaporating and in a number of breeds there is overproduction of tears. The tear ducts which carry the tears down into the nasal cavity, in general, are totally functional. It is rare that the tear ducts are non-functional. Treatment is variable - the area in which the tears are stored can be deepened surgically; the hairs around the inner aspect which are causing irritation can be moved out of the way and there are a few other alternatives as well. Oral medication has been suggested as a means of chemically changing the metabolism of the tears and making the staining less apparent. Treating the skin irritation where the tears flow onto the face should also be considered. In all cases the ophthalmologist should see the animal to give the pet owner the best of all the alternatives.

      Tear Stain Removal

      Tear stain removal has become much easier with various products now on the market just for this purpose.
      There are tear stain home remedies using mixtures of milk of magnesia, corn starch and peroxide, or bleach (usually hydrogen peroxide) used for human hair. However, if you were not to mix these properly, use precisely the right strength of each ingredient, and apply them safely, you could potentially harm your dog. No solution should ever be splashed into the pet's eye, or allowed to wick through the facial hair into the eye area. Read and follow all instructions very carefully.
      Keep in mind that you are treating the eye area of your pet and you can harm their sensitive areas. A full amount of caution and concern must be exercised whenever you use any product or mixture near eyes.
      Keeping tear stains at minimum is more of a concern for dogs that are shown, and for the dog not being shown, taking steps to safely minimize the condition should be satisfying enough rather than complete elimination. Consult your veterinarian with any questions you may have.

      Eye Care Tips for Tear Staining

      Measure equal parts Boric Powder, Baby Powder, mix together with Milk of Magnesia to smooth paste. You can make up a jar full. Apply to affected area with a soft toothbrush, allow to dry then brush off. If badly stained use a few drops of 10% peroxide in paste.

      Make a paste with corn starch and peroxide, apply with a small toothbrush, leave overnight and remove it with warm water or peroxide in the morning.

      Optrex Eye Wash - Clean around the eye area with cotton pads moistened with Optrex (contains Boric Acid and Witch Hazel).

      Mix equal amounts of Cornstarch and Boracic Acid Powder and pat gently onto the hair being extremely careful not to get any into the eyes or the mouth. The powder mixture will bleach the white whilst absorbing the stains.

      Add one tablespoon Boracic Acid to a cup of boiling water, mix well. Place several cotton swabs into a plastic container. Pour the cooled solution over the swabs and seal the container. Use one swab daily to clean away tear and face staining. Make up a new mix at least once weekly.

      Use equal amounts of Cornstarch and Boracic Acid, mix well, then

  45. QUESTION:
    is there a home remedy for dog and cat mites?
    something to use on both animals or seperate for mites(dogs and cats)? home remedy

    • ANSWER:
      (1) Clean the cat's ears out. The first step toward clearing up an ear mite infestation is to get as many tiny critters (and their belongings) out of the ear canal as possible. Put several drops of mineral oil into the ear canal and massage gently. If the debris is particularly hard and crusty, you may have to let the oil work in for a few hours to soften things up. The massaging will help bring debris up to the outer part of the ear where it can be wiped away with a cotton ball or tissue. (Do not use cotton swabs, even though you may have seen your vet clean a cat's ears that way -- one slip could puncture an eardrum.) If you want to do a thorough cleaning job (and you're courageous enough), you can use lukewarm distilled water in an ear syringe to gently flush out the canal. Repeat the cleaning procedure until the debris is gone.

      (2) Hit the mites while they're down. While the mineral oil immobilizes any mites left behind, it won't kill them all. To do that, you need insecticide eardrops. Reliable products that contain pyrethrins (a natural insecticide found in flowers of the mum family) are widely available at pet supply stores. Follow directions carefully, making sure to massage the drops in well and wipe away any excess.

      (3) Where mites might be. By the time you notice your cat has ear mites, there are literally thousands of the itty-bitty things around. Smaller than the period at the end of this sentence, a single ear mite can crawl out of your cat's ear canal and hide out deep in her fur -- only to crawl back in after all the excitement of treatment is over and repopulate the colony. Therefore, cats with ear mites need regular treatment with flea products to knock out those adventurous mites that go exploring elsewhere on the cat's body.

      If your best home remedies don't knock out ear mites within a month, or the skin in or around the ear becomes raw or inflamed, you need professional help. Likewise, if your cat has itchy ears, shakes her head, flattens her ears, and has discharge from the ear canal -- but no mite debris or there are no live mites to be found -- check with your vet. It could be a yeast or bacterial infection or another type of ear problem.

  46. QUESTION:
    Why does my dog scratch so much?
    I have a 4 1/2 year old shih tzu and he seems to scratch and lick himself alot. He has allergies and the vet recently put him on a prescription for it. But even with the medication he still scratches and licks alot.

    So is all of this licking and scratching from the allergies? What would cause him to lick and scratch so much? Is there anything I can do to stop him from doing it so much?

    • ANSWER:
      If your dog is being treated for 'allergies' he was most likely given steroids to relieve the itching. Steroids are very dangerous and do not cure anything, they just mask the symptoms temporarily but the underlying cause remains. In your case, they may even be the cause of your dog's skin problems.

      As Dr. Karen Becker, DVM states - "Steroids (also called prednisone, cortisone or the nondescript “allergy shot”) are the least optimal treatment choice, as they work by suppressing your pet’s immune system. Not only can steroids have a negative effect on your pet’s liver, adrenal glands and kidneys, but suppressing your pet’s immune system with steroids also allows for opportunistic yeast and bacteria to grow on your pet’s skin..." Please read the information below: 'Steroids The Great Pretender - Even Low Steroid Doses Can Be Trouble'.
      http://www.shirleys-wellness-cafe.com/steroids.htm

      Many vets assume that pet owners just want to see their pets get better at all cost or if they are not sure about what the problem is they will prescribe steroids knowing the risks.

      If you want to get your dog skin problems cured for good, stop the steroids and try the following remedy. For any skin infection (bacterial or fungal) such as the ones commonly caused by the use of steroids like prednisone, cortisone or the allergy shot or any secondary infections caused by scratching, I recommend a powder called 'Flowers of Sulfur' (also known as 'brimstone' or 'sublime sulfur').

      This substance has been used for thousands of years to cure all kinds of skin ailments including fungal and bacterial infections and if there is itching, it will stop it very quickly. Google it to learn more about its healing properties.

      Even vets have forgotten about this wonderful and inexpensive remedy but fortunately you can still purchase it at your local pharmacy for very little money. You can also buy it online at http://www.pennherb.com/search?mp=s&se=Flowers+of+Sulphur+Powder

      Flowers of sulfur is safe to apply to your pet's skin but take care not to inhale sulfur powder.

      You can dust this powder on your dog's skin OR mix it with an oil to rub on the skin. I prefer the latter.

      The dusting can easily be accomplished if you use a powdered sugar duster or an empty talcum powder bottle. Separate the hair as you go around dusting to expose the skin until you have covered it.

      Alternatively, mix 2 tablespoons of flower of sulfur with 1 cup of Jojoba oil and put it in a bottle. Always shake to mix well before applying to the skin as it tends to separate. You do not need to wear gloves as it is not toxic to humans either.

  47. QUESTION:
    Is it possible to have a recurring bout of ringworm? How do you treat it, other than with iodine?

    • ANSWER:
      Wasn't familiar with the iodine treatment for ringworm....but, for ringworm, EVERYONE affected with it, NEEDS to be treated...this INCLUDES ALL ANIMALS, and humans to animals is VERY likely passing it between each others....cats, horses, dogs.

      When I worked on a horse farm, the workers there used to used diluted bleach on skin....not usually recommended, but HIGHLY effective, and I wouldnt recommend it anywhere on sensitive skin, or on animals. so....arms, legs, maybe...no face, scalp, gentiles.

      You can use most over the counter antifungal treatments will work, but, you HAVE to follow the directions....use them the number of times a day, and for the number of days. you MAY need to COVER the area with a breathable dressing if there is a risk of it coming in contact with other areas/other people/animals.

      On dogs, you can use miconizole....but, make sure it is checked by a vet as well....you CAN use the over the counter miconizole cream....much less expensive than some of the vet treatments, but, not necessarily better....perhaps the "pledgets" wipes are better for animals if there is a chance of them licking the cream off.

      Hope this helped....good luck.

      Oh, and yes, you can get a recurring bout of it....or, just a BAD chronic fungus/yeast infection. IF this happens, please, go see your doc, as you may need to go on an oral medication, to help or a stronger skin cream, or they may have a better option for you to follow.

  48. QUESTION:
    Is my hamster sick or just old?
    My hamster's about 2 and a half years old, which is pretty old for a hamster. Lately, she's been looking really sickly. She can't really walk straight, she wobbles around and often falls over, has both white, flaky skin and red irritated skin, watery tired-looking eyes and is balding. Does she have some serious disease or is she just aging?

    • ANSWER:
      AL OF THE FOLLOWING HAS SOMETHING TO DO WITH WHAT YOU SAID

      DEMODICOSIS
      This disease is associated with two species of mite Demodex criceti and D. aurati. These mites can cause scaliness, papules and alopecia. Males are generally more susceptible to this disease than females. Immediate veterinarian treatment is essential. Occasionally the disease will return even after an effective treatment. Prevention measures include keeping the cage clean and a balanced diet.

      MANGE
      A very contagious skin infection caused by mites. Symptoms include excessive scratching and dry flaky skin. Additional symptoms include hair loss and scabs around the genitals, nose and ears. Because it is so contagious, isolation is necessary to reduce exposure to other hamsters, humans, and household pets. Extreme care should be exercised in sterilizing everything the hamster had contact with and washing hands with anti-bacterial soap after handling it. Immediate attention by the veterinarian is required.

      MITES
      When small “dots” are seen moving on the hamster and it is scratching excessively, the normal cause is mites, which can be caught from other hamsters or even bedding material. Isolate the infected hamster and dust both the hamster and the cage with pyrethrin powder or spray. A veterinarian should be consulted if the scratching persists or if there are indicates of hair loss or a skin infection or scaliness.

      THE HOMEMADE ANTI-MITE RECIPE FOR HAMSTERS
      1 pint of room temperature water
      1 Tablespoon of Witch hazel
      1 Tablespoon of Listerine (not flavoured)
      TREATMENT PROCEDURE:
      Apply the solution to the mite infected hamster externally with a washcloth or put the solution in a spray bottle and lightly spray the hamster while being careful to protect the eyes, nose and mouth. After you treat the hamster it is important to clean your hamster's cage and accessories thoroughly, change the bedding and spray the solution lightly in the cage and on the hamster's toys and accessories.
      Witch hazel can often be found in grocery stores but is more commonly found at your local drug store.

      Please note: This is not to be taken internally, it is a topical (on the skin) treatment.

      RINGWORM
      This is a very contagious fungal infection of the skin. Symptoms are circular hairless patches of dry scaly skin. This has become more common with the increased use of plastic enclosed case. (Condensation gets the bedding damp, which is an ideal environment for fungus.) Always wear gloves when handling a hamster with ringworm. Treatment consists of clipping the hair, sterilization of the cage, improved cage ventilation, bathing the infected areas with a povidone-iodine shampoo and administration of griscofulvin under the direction of a veterinarian.

      SARCOPTIC MANGE
      The particular type of mange is quite rare; but very contagious. The mite Sarcoptes Scabel causes it. In humans, this disease is called scabies. The condition can be treated if immediate medical treatment is sought. Infected animals should be isolated and everything it came in contact with sterilized.

      HAIR LOSS
      Hair loss in older hamsters is frequently seen as a result of chronic renal failure. Loss of hair can also be the result of rubbing on the wheel, leaking water bottle, or abrasive bedding. A low protein diet is also associated with hair loss, generally a diet with less than 16% protein. Or a secondary dietary problem is overfeeding “heat” producing grains and cereals, such as corn. This is easily remedied by increasing fruits and vegetables in the diet or by feeding half the dry grain/seed mix with boiled rice or puffed rice cereal. There are two different treatments for general hair loss: 1) one or two drops of cod-liver oil daily; 2) crush a yeast tablet (without garlic, which is hard on hamsters kidneys) in top of the food for three or four days, then decrease to once a week.

      FLEAS
      Dogs and cats can transmit fleas to hamsters excessive scratching is generally the first clue. Both the hamster and cage can be dusted with a pyrethrin powder or spray.

      COLDS & INFLUENZA
      Humans can transmit viral infections (colds and flu) to hamsters. Hamster colds can rapidly turn into pneumonia and death. Symptoms include sneezing, running nose, sometimes watery eyes and a high temperature, which is normally accompanied by lethargy. Treatment includes antibiotics prescribed by a veterinary, which may also be administered to prevent secondary infections. Keeping the hamster warm is essential. Vicks placed out of reach of the ill hamster but close enough to inhale will assist breathing and can help alleviate some congestion. Also, an old English remedy is lukewarm milk and water with a teaspoon of honey; but if improvement is not seen within two days treatment should be sought from a veterinary. Weight loss, shivering, chattering, and conjunctivitis may indicate Pasteur Ella pneumotropica, an infection of the lungs. Again, treatment is antibiotics as prescribed by the veterinarian.

      You could also try calling various vets for some free advice.

      Best of luck to the lil fellow :)

  49. QUESTION:
    Which over the counter medicines are safe for dogs besides benedryl?

    • ANSWER:
      Herb tea is an easy and convenient way to use herbs. Teas are made by boiling one tablespoon of dried plant material or two tablespoons of fresh plant material in a pint of water, then left to brew overnight. The tea should be kept refrigerated. Dose is one tablespoon per 50 pounds of dog weight added to each meal.

      Herbs can be chopped and added fresh, but should be steeped in warm water to break down the cellulose that is difficult for the dog to digest.(6)

      Herbal aids and treatments exist for a wide variety of symptoms from poor appetite and arthritis to parasite control and yeast infections. Many dog owners use herbs to repel fleas, soothe irritated skin, and to cure minor digestive upsets. However, the evidence that such herbal remedies as garlic, herbal rinses, or herbal flea collars actually repel external parasites is scarce.

      As homeopathic and herbal remedies grow in recognition, more and more pet owners are likely to gravitate to their use and more and more veterinarians will be amenable to using them as part of an arsenal of products available to enhance pet health. However, the lack of scientific evidence as to their efficacy is likely to remain a stumbling block to widespread acceptance.


treatment for yeast infection on dogs skin